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  • For those who live outside the US -Do you celebrate Christmas?

  • For those who live outside the US -Do you celebrate Christmas?

    Old 12-09-2010, 03:14 PM
      #21  
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    Originally Posted by tweetee
    Love the song Mrs B.....I have never heard that before!!

    We usually have a roast for lunch on christmas day, with lots and lots of food on the side. We generally eat left overs for the next 3 days! lol

    This year, Ive got the whole family over for lunch, so we have decided to have a BBQ instead. Im really looking forwad to it actually, its the first time in years the family has been togther for christmas. So again, there will be lots of fod, and lots of eating!
    What kind of food? do you do dishes that are european or Australian or English?

    A traditional meal for us is turkey and or ham mashed potatoes dressing etc etc. I usually make home made bread. so just wondered what kind of foods you serve.
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    Old 12-09-2010, 03:44 PM
      #22  
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    Originally Posted by Mrs B
    Some Australians still celebrate as our British ancestors did. Roast pork, turkey, ham and all the rosted vegetables followed by plum pudding with custard, cream and ice cream. Brandy butter is also traditionally served with the plum pudding. All the left overs go to the park the next day for a picnic lunch with extended family.
    We put up a tree with decorations, and lights. Some of the decorations were made by our chldren when they were at school. We also decorate the outside of our house with Christmas lights.
    Midnight Mass or a family Mass on Christmas Eve followed by wrapping the presents and placing them under the tree to be found the next morning, by children or big kids is exciting.
    We always watch Carols by candlelight on Christmas Eve.
    We also used to go for the custard, cream and ice cream together on puddings, lol. Yummy!!!

    Being a Brit, Boxing Day is an important part of the season. That was the day we would have ham, pork pie and trifle - almost better than Christmas Day :-)
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    Old 12-09-2010, 03:49 PM
      #23  
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    Originally Posted by akrogirl
    Originally Posted by Mrs B
    Some Australians still celebrate as our British ancestors did. Roast pork, turkey, ham and all the rosted vegetables followed by plum pudding with custard, cream and ice cream. Brandy butter is also traditionally served with the plum pudding. All the left overs go to the park the next day for a picnic lunch with extended family.
    We put up a tree with decorations, and lights. Some of the decorations were made by our chldren when they were at school. We also decorate the outside of our house with Christmas lights.
    Midnight Mass or a family Mass on Christmas Eve followed by wrapping the presents and placing them under the tree to be found the next morning, by children or big kids is exciting.
    We always watch Carols by candlelight on Christmas Eve.
    We also used to go for the custard, cream and ice cream together on puddings, lol. Yummy!!!

    Being a Brit, Boxing Day is an important part of the season. That was the day we would have ham, pork pie and trifle - almost better than Christmas Day :-)
    I'm familiar with the Boxing Day holiday only because I have heard of it. What is Boxing Day? Where did it originate?

    And pudding to me means a milk product that is like custard. So is your pudding a cake like product?
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    Old 12-09-2010, 04:43 PM
      #24  
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    Plum Pudding is a very moist cake-like pudding that has lots of sultanas, raisons, dried fruit and peel and sometimes nuts. It is traditionally mixed together and steamed for about 3 hours wrapped in a cheesecloth. then it can be hung in a cool dry place for up to 6 months before it is steamed again on Christmas day to eat.
    I, like many people simply buy my pudding the week before Christmas. Did I mention that it has a generous amount of alcohol in it? Usually rum, whiskey or brandy.
    Brandy butter is made with butter, caster sugar and brandy beaten together till it's white and smooth. My family love it! I think they have a bit of pudding with their brandy butter rather than the other way round!LOL
    Boxing Day originated in Britain I think. It was the day when you would visit friends and take their gift to them in a box, hence Boxing Day.
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    Old 12-09-2010, 05:09 PM
      #25  
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    Originally Posted by Rhonda
    Originally Posted by akrogirl
    Originally Posted by Mrs B
    Some Australians still celebrate as our British ancestors did. Roast pork, turkey, ham and all the rosted vegetables followed by plum pudding with custard, cream and ice cream. Brandy butter is also traditionally served with the plum pudding. All the left overs go to the park the next day for a picnic lunch with extended family.
    We put up a tree with decorations, and lights. Some of the decorations were made by our chldren when they were at school. We also decorate the outside of our house with Christmas lights.
    Midnight Mass or a family Mass on Christmas Eve followed by wrapping the presents and placing them under the tree to be found the next morning, by children or big kids is exciting.
    We always watch Carols by candlelight on Christmas Eve.
    We also used to go for the custard, cream and ice cream together on puddings, lol. Yummy!!!

    Being a Brit, Boxing Day is an important part of the season. That was the day we would have ham, pork pie and trifle - almost better than Christmas Day :-)
    I'm familiar with the Boxing Day holiday only because I have heard of it. What is Boxing Day? Where did it originate?

    And pudding to me means a milk product that is like custard. So is your pudding a cake like product?
    Where I come from, pudding tends to mean any kind of dessert, but most commonly refers to steamed sponge puddings such as syrup pudding, spotted dick or Christmas pudding.
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    Old 12-09-2010, 07:03 PM
      #26  
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    This year we are going to my mum's for christmas. She always does cold ham and chicken, salads, new potatoes etc. It's too hot for roasts. That is usually followed by sherry trifle, fruit salad and ice cream. When mum comes to our place we do a bbq.

    We have an artificial tree because we get hayfever so a real one is not a good idea in this house! We also have lights outside and lots of decorations hanging around inside. (Most have been put in my daughter's room!)

    This year I have decorated my office at work, and today wore a christmas tee shirt to work to get people into the spirit.
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    Old 12-09-2010, 07:55 PM
      #27  
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    Oh and i sent my friend in Japan a Christmas card! oh well, she's never said and it is a holiday for me. I'm just happy so many countries around the world celebrate Christmas.
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    Old 12-10-2010, 01:41 AM
      #28  
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    Hi Rhonda - over here in France, Christmas arrives very slowly and relaxed.... the Christmas trees are only just being delivered to the villages and small towns - every shop/business will have one outside the door usually decorated to a theme for each village. They dont take them down though until end Jan/early Feb!
    Homes are decorated traditionally - we havent got ours done yet, but will at the weekend.
    Christmas Day is mostly for the children and everywhere is only closed for that day. Present giving is usually for the children and very close family. Cards are only sent for New Year. The big family meal is usually taken very late in the evening on Christmas Eve - if the family go to midnight mass they will eat when they return home. Traditionally lots of seafood, many courses and takes most of the night. French are earnest gastronomes as everyone knows so will have lots of good food - oysters, foie gras, game, sometimes two meat courses, always a huge cheeseboard etc. Dessert is usually a fantastic patisserie concoction, bought in from the local artisan patissiere. Different wines for each course, lots and lots of champagne. Christmas Day is for late rising, eating up the leftovers, and recovering for work the next day.
    More and more people are starting to go to restaurants on Christmas Day - not too many are open but those that are, prepared a really special meal and bookings are made about 3 months beforehand.
    We usually eat at home or with friends during Christmas Day - but in the French style, although not all those courses!! Usually seafood and perhaps specially prepared turkey joint - I have one this year which is rolled with wild mushrooms, plums and armagnac - yum!
    New Year however is a much bigger celebration. The traditional community meal "Reveillon de St Sylvestre" will start around 10 or 11 pm in the village hall with about 150 to 200 people including children. There are about 8 or 9 courses with wines. A band is present and there is about 40 minutes dancing between each course. The majority of the community attend - the tickets are charged at cost and local ladies do all the cooking and serving. We have been 3 times to this event, and it finishes about 7 am when they serve onion soup for breakfast. It takes days to recover and we decided quite a few years ago it was too much! It's amazing to watch how the local people can eat so much, get up and dance and then eat, dance, eat, dance and so on....
    The local firemen, postman/lady, refuge collectors will all call at the houses in the days before Christmas with their calendars for next year, and people give donations to them. Especially important for the firemen as they are volunteers, they usually stop for a festive glass and chat. The post lady is a great service in rural parts and they will carry messages, keep an eye out for anyone needing help etc.
    Overall it's a lovely holiday here - no hype or panic buying, no parking problems, no crowds.
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    Old 12-10-2010, 08:38 AM
      #29  
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    Originally Posted by Katrine
    Hi Rhonda - over here in France, Christmas arrives very slowly and relaxed.... the Christmas trees are only just being delivered to the villages and small towns - every shop/business will have one outside the door usually decorated to a theme for each village. They dont take them down though until end Jan/early Feb!
    Homes are decorated traditionally - we havent got ours done yet, but will at the weekend.
    Christmas Day is mostly for the children and everywhere is only closed for that day. Present giving is usually for the children and very close family. Cards are only sent for New Year. The big family meal is usually taken very late in the evening on Christmas Eve - if the family go to midnight mass they will eat when they return home. Traditionally lots of seafood, many courses and takes most of the night. French are earnest gastronomes as everyone knows so will have lots of good food - oysters, foie gras, game, sometimes two meat courses, always a huge cheeseboard etc. Dessert is usually a fantastic patisserie concoction, bought in from the local artisan patissiere. Different wines for each course, lots and lots of champagne. Christmas Day is for late rising, eating up the leftovers, and recovering for work the next day.
    More and more people are starting to go to restaurants on Christmas Day - not too many are open but those that are, prepared a really special meal and bookings are made about 3 months beforehand.
    We usually eat at home or with friends during Christmas Day - but in the French style, although not all those courses!! Usually seafood and perhaps specially prepared turkey joint - I have one this year which is rolled with wild mushrooms, plums and armagnac - yum!
    New Year however is a much bigger celebration. The traditional community meal "Reveillon de St Sylvestre" will start around 10 or 11 pm in the village hall with about 150 to 200 people including children. There are about 8 or 9 courses with wines. A band is present and there is about 40 minutes dancing between each course. The majority of the community attend - the tickets are charged at cost and local ladies do all the cooking and serving. We have been 3 times to this event, and it finishes about 7 am when they serve onion soup for breakfast. It takes days to recover and we decided quite a few years ago it was too much! It's amazing to watch how the local people can eat so much, get up and dance and then eat, dance, eat, dance and so on....
    The local firemen, postman/lady, refuge collectors will all call at the houses in the days before Christmas with their calendars for next year, and people give donations to them. Especially important for the firemen as they are volunteers, they usually stop for a festive glass and chat. The post lady is a great service in rural parts and they will carry messages, keep an eye out for anyone needing help etc.
    Overall it's a lovely holiday here - no hype or panic buying, no parking problems, no crowds.
    Katrine that was such a lovely explanation! Mom was inspired to ask this because of you and Eric. She has been thinking more about people in other countries now. By the way wish Eric a Merry Christmas from us and to you and your family also!

    I presume they don't celebrate Christmas in the countries your cousin lives and travels in? He's in Hong Kong right? Then travels in Thailand and surrounding countries. I would presume they don't have Christmas.

    I enjoyed your descriptions and I know my mom will too. thanks!!
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    Old 12-10-2010, 09:09 AM
      #30  
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    No, he's in Singapore Rhonda. He rang me last Sunday and it was 31C and they were all having brunch around the pool!
    But yes his job covers Asia so he is always somewhere exotic. There is a big expat community in Singapore, and from what he say, it seems most of them are ex Royal Marines as he is! Last year he sent us details of the (very exclusive and sumptuous) hotel where they were spending Christmas Day - very, very special. He nags us continually to go visit for a few weeks and "he will show us Asia" - one day maybe.
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