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Thread: turning sharp points on elongated triangles

  1. #1
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    turning sharp points on elongated triangles

    I've been scouring the net looking for the best way to get sharp corners on elongated triangles like a jesters hat or the santa/wizards and birds seen on this blog: http://virginiarobertsonsblog.com/ ... the triangles I'm working with are 6" wide x 16" long, 5"W x 14L and 6"W x 12"L.. I've fooled with knitting needles, bodkins and this other long plastic thing that kinds holds the point while you turn.. but none are allowing me good sharp points.. Can anyone guide me please?

    thanks!

  2. #2
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    Are you sewing sharp points and and then turning them right side out? If so, you will need to trim the excess fabric from the points and grade the fabric going to the points on both sides so the point can be turned without too much fabric in the point. Be careful pushing out the points so you don't put a hole in the point.
    It also helps to put the pointed end of your object (I use my Purple Thang)right up into the point before turning the whole piece. Hold the point and material with your fingers and then ease the rest of the triangle down.

  3. #3
    Super Member nanacc's Avatar
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    I agree with Tartan about trimming and grading fabric at the point. I was told once never to make a point sharp, but to take one short stitch across the tip. When doing collars and such, it did turn neater.
    I also buy cheap wooden skewers for use as stilletos or turners. Just be sure to use something like sand paper to smooth any snags and you can cut them to length.
    Last edited by nanacc; 09-13-2014 at 11:40 PM. Reason: add

  4. #4
    Super Member QuiltingVagabond's Avatar
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    All good tips so far, I also have used a stout pin or needle and inserted it into the seam near the tip to "poke" or "push" the point in place. You do have to be careful not to pull the fabric threads out when doing this as there is not much there after trimming and grading your seams.
    QuiltingVagabond aka Kathy

  5. #5
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    I was taught to sew the side seam up to the area of the point - sew 2 stitches across the top - then back down the other side seam. After the trimming/grading that has already been mentioned, this should get you the sharpest point you are probably going to get.

  6. #6
    Super Member GrammaNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ Quilter View Post
    I was taught to sew the side seam up to the area of the point - sew 2 stitches across the top - then back down the other side seam. After the trimming/grading that has already been mentioned, this should get you the sharpest point you are probably going to get.
    This has always worked for me.
    I am too POSITIVE to be doubtful, too OPTIMISTIC to be fearful and way to DETERMINED to be defeated.

  7. #7
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    Take two or three pieces of thread double the length of the hat, tie a knot in the center. Sew the hat seam so that one end of the string is in the hat and the other end with the knot is on the outside end that is tapered. Sew the tip with the thread caught in the seam at the tip, using small stitches. You do not want the knot to slip through. Grade seam, but DO NOT cut thread. Holding onto thread string from inside hat, gently pull. It will turn the hat and pull the point at the same time. Trim thread and then pull the knotted thread out from the inside. Hope you understand what I am trying to say; I am better at showing than explaining in words.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by yngldy View Post
    Take two or three pieces of thread double the length of the hat, tie a knot in the center. Sew the hat seam so that one end of the string is in the hat and the other end with the knot is on the outside end that is tapered. Sew the tip with the thread caught in the seam at the tip, using small stitches. You do not want the knot to slip through. Grade seam, but DO NOT cut thread. Holding onto thread string from inside hat, gently pull. It will turn the hat and pull the point at the same time. Trim thread and then pull the knotted thread out from the inside. Hope you understand what I am trying to say; I am better at showing than explaining in words.
    OH!! Thank you so much! I have 47 of these elongated triangles to sew for 3 mantle runners.. I sewed mine (17) this morning I should have waited, but I'm sure you all know how that goes! I sewed one side then the other, I didn't actually "turn the corner" on them.

    OK I will try this last suggestion.. I can still get the thread in there now with the knot and all and yes I completely understand your method! The next set of 15 I'll sew them with the 1 or 2 stitches across and see how that goes.. and yes I know I need to really trim the excess - I only sewed 1/4" seams but they do need to be trimmed before any turning no matter which method..

    Thanks!!!
    Debbie, NY & VA
    Centennial Singer Featherweight
    1978 Singer Stylist 538
    2013 Viking Sapphire 875Q
    www.shelteredstitches.com

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=wkdwich;6887514]I've been scouring the net looking for the best way to get sharp corners on elongated triangles like a jesters hat or the santa/wizards and birds seen on this blog: http://virginiarobertsonsblog.com/ ... the triangles I'm working with are 6" wide x 16" long, 5"W x 14L and 6"W x 12"L.. I've fooled with knitting needles, bodkins and this other long plastic thing that kinds holds the point while you turn.. but none are allowing me good sharp points.. Can anyone guide me please?
    I was taught that when you're sewing a point, you should stitch up one side, turn your fabric slightly, take one stitch across, then turn and sew down the other side. The extra stitch allows for the bulk from both sides of whatever it is your sewing together. Trim your fabric, and you should have a nice sharp point. Good luck!

  10. #10
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    have you tried the trick with the soda straw? You stick the soda straw inside the item to be turned, use a blunt tipped item like a knitting needle, crochet hook, or chopstick to push the point into the soda straw & continue pushing till the item is turned. Works best with the larger straws. I've tried it and it does work. just an idea.
    Sandee in Mo

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sassysews2 View Post
    have you tried the trick with the soda straw? You stick the soda straw inside the item to be turned, use a blunt tipped item like a knitting needle, crochet hook, or chopstick to push the point into the soda straw & continue pushing till the item is turned. Works best with the larger straws. I've tried it and it does work. just an idea.
    Sandee in Mo
    Well no I have not, very intriguing though.. I have 47 of these bad girls to turn over the next few weeks, I'm going to try all these suggestions and I'll report back which was easiest!
    Debbie [wondering why I didn't get notice of new posts here.. pooooo]
    Debbie, NY & VA
    Centennial Singer Featherweight
    1978 Singer Stylist 538
    2013 Viking Sapphire 875Q
    www.shelteredstitches.com

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkdwich View Post
    Well no I have not, very intriguing though.. I have 47 of these bad girls to turn over the next few weeks, I'm going to try all these suggestions and I'll report back which was easiest!
    Debbie [wondering why I didn't get notice of new posts here.. pooooo]
    Reporting in...

    I bought:
    Dritz® Loop Turner
    http://www.joann.com/dritz-loop-turner/1048347.html


    Clip "N Turn
    http://www.joann.com/clip-inn-turn/8588576.html

    and a #10 1.3mm crochet hook

    The clip n turn was useless.. the loop turner got me close enough but I still wasn't happy. I was able to put he hook end of the crochet needle into the smooshed point and pull it out a little more.. I was afraid to go too far and wreck it..

    All in all I think I'm good with where they are now.. the next set I will stitch with a tighter stitch, maybe 15/inch that might allow me to get a little more point..





    Debbie, NY & VA
    Centennial Singer Featherweight
    1978 Singer Stylist 538
    2013 Viking Sapphire 875Q
    www.shelteredstitches.com

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