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Thread: Are you old enough to remember...

  1. #1
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    I was stitching along and accidently sewed over a pin. It made me remember how the big advance in sewing was the hinged foot. The ballyllhoo was that you could sew over pins!! And we did it for years. THEN the wisdom was don't sew over pins. It is hard on the pins and if the needle hits it, it can break. So I avoid stitching over them, do you?

  2. #2
    Power Poster erstan947's Avatar
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    I try not too but I don't pin a lot. It is better for your machine (I think) to remove the pins as you get to them.

  3. #3
    Super Member sahm4605's Avatar
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    dont sew over them. don't want to risk an accident of breaking one and it flying into my face or my kids face if they are around.

  4. #4
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    I try my best not to sew over them. It can also cause a timing problem with your machine if you hit one just right.

    mltquiit

  5. #5
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    I put pins in horizonally about a half inch from the edge, that way the pins keeps the fabric together and I don't sew over them. Just hate the sound of a needle breaking, been there,done that; and possibly bending the shaft.

    Carol J.

  6. #6
    Super Member orangeroom's Avatar
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    I sew over them. And yes, sometimes I break a needle doing so. That's why I have plenty extra needles in my sewing desk!

  7. #7
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    I pull them out just before the fabric hits the presser foot. Its a safety issue.

  8. #8
    Power Poster blueangel's Avatar
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    I try not too.

  9. #9
    TheSevenYearStitch's Avatar
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    I'm horrified that the needle will break and fly into my eye...so I don't sew over them!

  10. #10
    Super Member Carrie Jo's Avatar
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    That was one of the things I had to get used to. I always used to sew over them then after not sewing for years I have to retrain my self.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Kehoeta's Avatar
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    I was taught that it is ok to sew over them... But I don't now....

    Just like everything else - we learn new things

  12. #12
    Senior Member dogsgod's Avatar
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    I find if I slow down my machine tends to find it's way over the pin without hitting it. I very rarely break a needle. Too lazy to stop and pull out every pin! Of course I avoid pinning at all whenever possible!

  13. #13
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    I try not to, but sometimes they just appear and I do hit them!!

  14. #14
    Super Member leatheflea's Avatar
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    I just bought a new Brother machine this year from a dealer. I go back to that dealer often to by thread because I get a discount on everything else in the store since I purchased a machine. Anyway while talking to the dealer a couple of weeks go she warned me harshly not to sew over the pins, alot of the new models can short out if you jam a pin in them. Now I've been sewing for years and its a habit to sew over them, thats how every sewing teacher I had taught. But with the fear of shorting out my machine, in the last few weeks I've been taking the pins out just as I get to them. Not a hard habit to break when you talk about hundreds of dollars to fix. Warranty doesn't cover it if they find a pin jammed in there somewhere. Sometimes I think all these bells and whistles arent worth the hassle.

  15. #15
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    I used to but don't much anymore. If I think I need to, to hold the fabric, I will stop and 'walk' the machine over it.

  16. #16
    Super Member just_the_scraps_m'am's Avatar
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    rarely use them & when i do i don't put them in the way of the foot...
    there ARE ways of sewing over them w/o breaking anything-- seems like a no brainer...

  17. #17
    Super Member Annie68's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KwiltyKahy
    I was stitching along and accidently sewed over a pin. It made me remember how the big advance in sewing was the hinged foot. The ballyllhoo was that you could sew over pins!! And we did it for years. THEN the wisdom was don't sew over pins. It is hard on the pins and if the needle hits it, it can break. So I avoid stitching over them, do you?
    I always try not to sew over pins, happens though
    :!:

  18. #18
    Super Member eparys's Avatar
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    It is not a good idea but I do all the time - but I am very careful and go slowly when I do this. If you hit a pin just right, you can really mess up your machine. After working for Viking, I have seen some very unhappy machines that ran over too many pins.

    If I have a block or a border that I need to "ease" into place and it would require many pins, I do what we used to do in clothing construction with sleeves. I run a tad longer stitch just inside the seam allowance and loosen the tension. I then pull one thread to tighten up the stitches (like you would gather but without the gathers - does this make sense??). Works great for easing one block to another when they are a bit off.

  19. #19
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I try and avoid sewing over them.

  20. #20
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    I do remember sewing over pins, along with broken needles and bent pins and sometimes damage to the fabric, so I decided that that's ridiculous to keep replacing needles and pins and have been taking the pins out before the needle gets there for many years.

  21. #21
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    I don't sew over pins.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Cheri_J's Avatar
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    I pin below the stitch line. I never sew over them - just above them.

  23. #23
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    only if I HAVE HAVE HAVE to due to ease. I go really slow, and if I can, pull it out just as I get to it. But, my machine is an old Singer 403, nothing to short out. Will not dream of it with my new to me computerized machine.

    One thing that works well with easing quilt blocks when attaching rows & larger pieces, I put 2 pins parrallell to where the seam line will be, 1/2 inch apart, and sew between them.

    For ease assistance, I have a "useless" pink singer seam ripper (tip too fat to ease under a thread & cutting field is in wrong place) that I use to push upper ease under the foot, I push with the ball. It helps a surprising amount.

  24. #24
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I know several people who have had problems with their machines after sewing over pins...or rather sewing onto a pin. Besides breaking needles, it can mess up your machine, and can be costly to fix. Better to take out your pins just before you get to them.

  25. #25
    Super Member eparys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmouse
    ...For ease assistance, I have a "useless" pink singer seam ripper (tip too fat to ease under a thread & cutting field is in wrong place) that I use to push upper ease under the foot, I push with the ball. It helps a surprising amount.
    I do this as well - works great - but I use it sideways and use the back edge of the tip piece.

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