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Thread: FMQ foot modification- any feedback on this Leah Day tip?

  1. #1
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    FMQ foot modification- any feedback on this Leah Day tip?

    Some of you have already been very kind in advising me about my ongoing FMQ woes.

    My continuing search for a solution brought me to a clip from Leah Day. I can't find it again but this is another clip from Leah with the same technique, without showing the machine working: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APD6s7PwoqU

    Oh! Found it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwbNPgnP8r4

    Is this the Holy Grail?!!!! Stopping the foot from hopping and setting the height with a rubber band?

    Any voices of experience much appreciated. Please do share.....
    Fortune favours the prepared mind
    "Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler." Albert Einstein

  2. #2
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    thanks so much for the link. very helpful.

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    I'm definitely not an expert but his purely optionial. I'm lucky because my machine has two ways to FMQ; with one foot like this one it does hop up and down and the other one doesn't; it hovers over the fabric. When it hops up and down it'll actually be holding the fabric down during the stitch; the other one does not. The viking rep says this is better than using the floating one. I've had others who prefer the floating on to the hopping one (not sure the accuate name) but it's built into my machine so I don't have to worry what its called; I just click on the icon and it shows me the two options and I chose one and make sure the correct foot is installed.
    Judy

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    Senior Member kat13's Avatar
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    I had that plastic foot and my hubby cut it because I couldn't see what I was doing, used it for a long time til I found a metal one that was open toe...so much better! I have one that doesn't hop too but haven't tried it yet. Kinda cool tho what you can do with a rubber band!

  5. #5
    Super Member leatheflea's Avatar
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    When I quilt buy domestic machine I use a foot with Leah's modifications. I find it much easier to see what I'm doing.

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    I too have modified my FMQ foot following Leah's instruction, I also FMQ with the feed dogs up and the stitch length to O, I find I have been control and I am not distracted by the hopping foot, but I still have a long way to go with my FMQ. But I do practise

  7. #7
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
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    Yep gonna have to try that someday.

  8. #8
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Some of the machines have feet with the toe already cut out.

    If you have a Janome, get their special packaged quilting feet. It comes with one part that you attach onto the machine, and three interchangeable feet. I prefer the large plastic one more like a paw than a foot!! You can also adjust the height so a quilt slides under it easily. Handy when switching from thinly batted quilts to thick batts.
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  9. #9
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by romanojg View Post
    I'm definitely not an expert but his purely optionial. I'm lucky because my machine has two ways to FMQ; with one foot like this one it does hop up and down and the other one doesn't; it hovers over the fabric. When it hops up and down it'll actually be holding the fabric down during the stitch; the other one does not. The viking rep says this is better than using the floating one. I've had others who prefer the floating on to the hopping one (not sure the accuate name) but it's built into my machine so I don't have to worry what its called; I just click on the icon and it shows me the two options and I chose one and make sure the correct foot is installed.
    I have a Viking 875 Quilt and have always had problems w/ fmq and the tension on the underside. It, for no reason I can understand will make a rat's nest on the underside, which I believe is caused by the upper thread. Does your machine ever do this? My dealer/repair shop always tells me, "Oh it jumped out of the tension." But when I look in there after this happens, the thread appears to be sitting in the correct place. Of course, it never does it for them when they test it. I re thread the top and sometimes that fixes it, sometimes not. I'm using Superior thread too, so it's not the thread causing it to happen.

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    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I not only stopped mine from hopping; I also cut the front of it so it would be an open toe foot. It helped me tremendously. With the closed foot, I just couldn't see where I was going. I'm sure many, many people do well the other way, but for me no hopping and open toe was a big part of the answer. Now, I just need about a zillion hours more practice so I can do something other than meander.

  11. #11
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Yes I do have problems with the tension of my bobbin thread when I fmq- that's why I am researching techniques.....
    Quote Originally Posted by fireworkslover View Post
    I have a Viking 875 Quilt and have always had problems w/ fmq and the tension on the underside. It, for no reason I can understand will make a rat's nest on the underside, which I believe is caused by the upper thread. Does your machine ever do this? My dealer/repair shop always tells me, "Oh it jumped out of the tension." But when I look in there after this happens, the thread appears to be sitting in the correct place. Of course, it never does it for them when they test it. I re thread the top and sometimes that fixes it, sometimes not. I'm using Superior thread too, so it's not the thread causing it to happen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by noveltyjunkie View Post
    Some of you have already been very kind in advising me about my ongoing FMQ woes.

    My continuing search for a solution brought me to a clip from Leah Day. I can't find it again but this is another clip from Leah with the same technique, without showing the machine working: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APD6s7PwoqU

    Oh! Found it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwbNPgnP8r4

    Is this the Holy Grail?!!!! Stopping the foot from hopping and setting the height with a rubber band?

    Any voices of experience much appreciated. Please do share.....
    I just ordered the foot generic foot from her shop yesterday. I'll try it out and let folks know if it works for me...

  13. #13
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I have seen this before, I would not mess with my darning foot. I have quilted so many quilts I don't think I would benefit from her tip.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

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    Hi, yes I tried it, and it helped but it takes time to get it to the correct height, but it works.

  15. #15
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    Interesting experiences there, thanks. Keep them coming!

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    I actually use my embroidery foot for FMQ. I was using my quilting foot that is open, buy it would get caught on the edges and other threads. The embroidery foot is a round circle and seems to work well.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireworkslover View Post
    I have a Viking 875 Quilt and have always had problems w/ fmq and the tension on the underside.
    It's possible that the thread is still in the tension discs but has jumped out of another part of the threading process. Not sure how old your machine is or if this information will in any way address your problem - but about two years ago Viking was having problems with thread jumping out of the uptake lever on some of their machines - the arm that goes up and down on top of the machine (after the thread passes thru the tension discs). the fix was to put on an adapter which held the thread in the correct place - if this was never done on your machine, you might check to see if it should have been done and if that could be part of your problem. If this is the problem, and if you are the original owner of the machine, the upgrade/fix should be free to you....but you'll have to work that out with the dealer. I'm sorry I can't remember which model this was done for.

    also - one of the reasons for hopping is that the foot will hold the fabric down while the needle is coming up out of it, ensuring that the stitch is completed properly. It's especially important when quilting a sandwich with a fluffy batting which springs up when no pressure is on it. A floating foot (which I've never used) should be close enough to do this same thing, but far enough above the fabric to allow free movement of the sandwich.
    Kate

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