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Thinking of buying a long arm? Read this Longing for a long arm book

Thinking of buying a long arm? Read this Longing for a long arm book

Old 11-25-2019, 06:45 AM
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Default Thinking of buying a long arm? Read this Longing for a long arm book

I told my husband this $5 book is the best money I’ve spent all year. It outlines the benefits and especially the drawbacks of owning a long arm. It also talks about the feasibility of setting up a business. It referenced you to YouTube videos, that demoed what it took to set up the longarm for quilting and other videos. Talked about many things I hadn’t thought of. Short but informative. After reading it, it was clear to me a longarm would not be a wise purchase for me.

Only drawbook was that I could only find it as a kindle book but it was easy to download the app to read it.

Hope it helps los someone else and no I’m not getting a kickback.
https://www.amazon.com/Longing-Longa.../dp/B00HY1LXZE
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Old 11-25-2019, 10:04 AM
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I thought for years I wanted a nice big long arm. My non quilting cousin's MIL died and they had to clean out her house fast. There was an APO LA as her MIL was a quilter. The thing was hardly used. She gave it to me to use. I was thrilled. After a few classes and lots of practice I didn't want it anymore. Too much trouble. I am so glad I didn't invest in one. We sold it. I bought a sit down Juki machine set up and love it. It's not any trouble, just sit down and quilt, more like using a sewing machine.
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Old 11-25-2019, 12:23 PM
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There was an APO LA

Ooops should be APQS Long Arm machine.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:26 PM
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I very much appreciate the heads' up on the Kindle book. It will be an interesting read.
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Old 11-25-2019, 04:40 PM
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I just bought my long arm a few months ago. It was a hefty investment, no lie, but so far I am happy with the decision. I will look into this resource, as I am always looking to learn more. thank you.
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Old 11-25-2019, 05:01 PM
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Long arming does take more physical stamina and ability than a lot of people realize. On the other hand, it allows some of us with physical issues the ability to do our own quilting that might be too hard on us in another form. I think most of the people here really advise people to take their time, visit Sew Expos, try a few machines and take a class or two at a local shop/long armer and I always say use your tape measure before committing to the purchase. It takes at least a typical sized single car garage or family room to be comfortable, for me anyway.

I would so get a long arm if I had (a) the money and (b) the space. I know there is more to being computerized than just pointing and going, but I'd love to learn how to do it and I want that ability. I've gotten pretty proficient with stitch regulator and my technical skills were ok, but my downfall is that I just don't think in terms of what can be done with quilting. My joy is in the planning and piecing and I can piece very quickly. The only thing that does slow me down is getting my tops finished or I would piece even more than I do now. I haven't counted in awhile but I typically have around 20 tops waiting to be quilted. Everything is expensive in my area, I think to get what I want each of those tops would cost $350-500+ for quilting (sure, I could get a simple edge to edge non custom finish for a little less -- but I can do that eventually on my domestic), if I sent out those tops alone that's 8-10k. The way I see it, it makes a lot of sense for me to have a long arm, but I just don't have the space even when I've seen some really great deals. I was able to use a friend's set up for a few years and now I'm spoiled, really hard to go back to a domestic.

For people with more space and/or budget than me, why not get one if it isn't going to break the bank? In my lottery dreams I turn my current home into my sewing studio and I have a professional Statler model named Elvira sitting right about where I am now.

I see the wonderful things people do here in in shows and magazines and all that, and all I can do is admire their work and sometimes steal an idea or two. Some people can take any old thing and elevate it by their work. I'm mostly just trying to keep it all together in the wash! I have fairly high standards, so it isn't my workmanship but rather the art of quilting that I'm missing.
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Old 11-25-2019, 05:48 PM
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mjpencinitas - If you have made up your mind, i certainly dont wanna complicate your life, but...

Maybe you would be happy with a sitdown longarm instead... they dont take up near as much space as a standup machine. They cost about a quarter of what you might spend on a standup longarm.

Mine is not electronic, is easy to maintain and learn to use. I just basically sitdown and quilt - there are no feed dogs and i have a huge harp area and height. I love having a dedicated quilting machine and it - and the included table - fit perfectly into the extra bedroom that is now my Happy Place! Just a thought cuz there are more types of longarms than just the standup ones.

I only quilt for me and never wanted to make a business of quilting. If i invested in a standup longarm, i would feel compelled to get one with all the bells and whistles because i would feel like if i spent all that money then i better be prepared to make it pay for itself. I dont want that because for me that would take all the fun out of quilting - then it would be just another job. I quilt to unwind and relax and be creative.

I had done FMQ in my DSM for many years and pretty much decided that i didnt need a longarm (even though i wanted one). But... in consideration of retirement in a few years, i finally quit talking myself out of it because basically if i really wanted one it was now or never! I am so happy that i finally allowed myself to go ahead with the purchase!

I have had mine for a year now. FMQ is so much more fun now with more room! I also thought i would never have any interest in doing “ruler work”... boy was i wrong! After watching some really great videos on using rulers i could really get my head around the value of learning that skill and i am working to get better!

Like i said, i dont want to make your life more complicated if you have already decided what is right for you. I respect that. I just want to make sure that you are aware of all of the options you might have available to you.
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Old 11-25-2019, 06:11 PM
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Oh there was a nice sit down set up on Craig's List today, still no room for it!

My modern Bernina 820 has a huge throat and I can happily and easily do a twin size -- and if it was in a table I'd consider a queen, but still not the same as the long arm. Unfortunately, Bernie needs a servicing and I am just not going back to my old vintage machine.

I think there is just a basic difference between moving the machine which I do better than moving the quilt, which many people do better than I do.

Edit/PS: You can have a long arm set up for chair height, one of my friends is set up that way. She says you quickly get used to involving your feet in the process but she likes to have really loud music on while quilting!
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Old 11-25-2019, 06:15 PM
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Oh yes, long arm quilting can be tiring. my friend's daughter did quilts for others and is such a perfectionist she ended up with serious neck trouble. she had me make tops for her and then sent those to others for completion when needing quilts for her friends. sad but hopefully she will be back quilting sometime soon.
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Old 11-25-2019, 06:17 PM
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Iceblossom - Mine measures 48” x 30” including the table... still too big?
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