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Thread: 1/4 inch is how many millimeters?

  1. #1
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    1/4 inch is how many millimeters?

    i think there are 25.4 mm in an inch?

    for those that usually use the metric system of measurements - do you buy patterns with the inch-foot-yard measuring system? if so, how do you convert the measurements to the metric system?

  2. #2
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    Sorry the metric system came too late in my education. I go with inches, feet and Fahrenheit for temperature.

  3. #3
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    I use the Imperial system for patterns.

    Watson

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    Despite being metric and fabric being sold by the m etc. Patterns are generally still imperial (mainly because most are American I think!). My sewing machine has a setting for 1/4 seam but also 7mm seam - so I’m guessing that is what is used as standard in Metric patterns? Not sure though

  5. #5
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    1/4 in = 6.35 mm. As bearisgray suggested there are 25.4 mm in and inch so you would multiply .25 x 25.4. An easier way is to open up your browser and do a Google search for .25 in = mm and the answer will appear. 1/4 in = mm also works.

  6. #6
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    I was raised on imperial, and everything changed to metric in '66, a month after I was married, so am familiar with both. This is how I see things regarding quilting, if a little rough.

    2.5cm (25mm) = 1"
    30 cm = 1ft
    1 mtr = 39.?"
    1.5mtrs = 60"
    2 mtrs = 80"
    2.5mts = 100"

    These aren't precise measurements but it's easier to wrap my brain around.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Just use inches, that is what most are use to. 1/4" = 1/4" to me.
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  8. #8
    Junior Member pippa's Avatar
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    I use both. I have patterns and rulers for both. The standard foot on my Bernina is 0.75 which is what I go with for cms. and I have a 1/4 inch foot. The trick is to go with one or the other system of measurement not to try converting. It doesn't work well. Most cutting mats have inches on one side and cms on the other.

  9. #9
    Super Member Anael's Avatar
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    I only use inches. I was raised on metric but because almost all patterns come in inches I find it hard to convert and never do. I never purchase Dutch quilting magazines because the measurements are in cm and I don't have rulers in cm
    Eat, quilt, bike, sleep and repeat



  10. #10
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    Since I taught science for 30 years, I’m comfortable with metric units. (But when I rode my Harley to Canada, I was planning to claim the opposite if I’d been stopped for speeding! I never was though) I have an app on my smart phone to quickly convert between the two systems, so I cheat on it now. As said in an earlier post, 6.35 mm is the exact conversion for 1/4 inch.

  11. #11
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    According to my bi-lingual measuring tape it looks to be 6-7 mm is 1/4 inch.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Sorry the metric system came too late in my education. I go with inches, feet and Fahrenheit for temperature.
    So do I! Does this date us? lol

  13. #13
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    ask google! 6.35mm.
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    I’m old enough not to care. I genuinely love the international scientific units. SI units for the lovers of physics and other things of tangible production. That said I have always been immersed in the American system of inches and feet. It’s mathematically a pain in the ass. Being immersed in the American system I’m fluent in it. I once work for a company and we were not in the field laying sewer pipe but at the shop doing oil changes on all of the company trucks. I whipped out my trusty 15mm socket and had my truck drained. Every one else no way am I using a metric socket on my Chevrolet I will wait til the old guy gets here he has a 19/32 socket he bought especially for oil changes. Impossible to convince them Chevrolet has been using metric bolts since 1980.
    Btw 5/16 is almost exactly 8mm. I would run 7mm seam because I bet that is already marked on the machine

  15. #15
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    I'm of the "inch, feet and yard" generation.

  16. #16
    Super Member MaryMo's Avatar
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    I use the right part of my sewing foot as a guide . . . it's not a perfect 1/4" nor 6.75 mm but it's consistent so it works for me. I have to cut my blocks on the long side of a measurement (outside edge of 5" for example or a bit more for larger measurements). Consistency is the key.

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