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Thread: 505 spray instead of fusible webbing?

  1. #1
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    505 spray instead of fusible webbing?

    I have been doing quite a bit of applique recently and it's takes so long to draw everything on fusible paper and then iron it to the fabric, then cut it out etc. Why can't I just cut out the shapes I want and spray them and stick them to the main fabric. I will attach with a machine blanket stitch. I'm sure someone here has tried it. Does it work?
    I don't want to brag but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I haven't tried it, but it should work. You would probably want to spray inside a cardboard box to prevent sticky overspray from getting everywhere, and you need good ventilation while spraying (outside is good!).

    What I think would be easier, though, is to iron fusible onto your entire piece of fabric and then cut out your designs from the fabric.

  3. #3
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    I know what you are saying but I am doing a lot of flowers with different colored fabrics--not a lot of the same fabric.
    I don't want to brag but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school.

  4. #4
    Senior Member pippi65's Avatar
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    This is a hard one. I've never done anything with 505 except batting. I don't see why it wouldn't work though. I under stand what you mean about using lots of different fabrics. I adhere my fusible to the different fabrics and save what's left for another project on something else.
    Be kinder than necessary,everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I guess I would rough cut, say, 5-inch pieces of fabric, lay them all out on a piece of fusible, and fuse them all in one go. If you are using applique sheets or parchment paper, it doesn't matter if there are small gaps between the fabric pieces.

    If you use Misty Fuse, you don't even have any paper to remove. Just fuse and cut out the flowers.

  6. #6
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    I've tried that and found that the fusible also works as a stabilizer when I applique.

  7. #7
    Member msbRON's Avatar
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    Use dots of Elmer's school glue, or the glue stick to attach shapes to main fabric. It dries clear, and washes out completely. Alot of people here on the board have used this method.

  8. #8
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    I have used your method. I found it didn't give enough stability for me to satin stitch the applique down, but if you are going to use blanket stitch then I don't see why it wouldn't work fine. I got a very large box to lay the pieces in, then sprayed them. Sometimes I went outside, sometimes I didn't. The box is about a 2 ft cube - so no overspray. I use spray adhesive where ever I can. I like the uniformity of the coverage versa the spotty coverage of a liquid glue or a glue stick. Good luck.

  9. #9
    Power Poster Annaquilts's Avatar
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    I have used this technique with raw edge applique. A good fussible will give aditional strenght to adhering the applique to the quilt permanently while with a spray the applique adheres only by it being sewn down, especially over time or after washing. One is a temporary bond and one is a permanent bond.
    Anna Quilts

  10. #10
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    The only "problem" I can see is that the 505 spray washes out. The iron on stabilizer kind of holds the piece in place. I find that is necessary since I use the blanket stitch to finish the piece and it doesn't seem too stable without the iron -on JMHO
    Sue

  11. #11
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    I've used 505 for smaller applique pieces and to hold labels in place til I hand stitch them down.
    So with my limited experience, I'd say, why not?

    Try it on a sample (make a mug rug or something simple!) and see if you like how it goes.
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  12. #12
    Senior Member Phyllis nm's Avatar
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    I use 505 for emb and have for years. I cut both ends out of cans [gallon, quart, pint, or Ritz’s cracker box for large ect.]. Then I hoop my cut or tear away backing, set a can inside the hoop and spray. My hoop stays clean, no over spray, then lay your emb project on top and re-hoop.>>
    You can draw you placement line, spray, then place fabric on top and hoop.>>
    I also keep a large cardboard box [cut down sides] and spray inside for odd size appliqué projects.>>

  13. #13
    Super Member Nanamoms's Avatar
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    I was in Dollar General and checking thru their school supplies for sewing/quilting supplies (as mentioned in another thread here). I saw the Elmer's Spray On Glue and almost bought some but I noticed that is said "repositionable for a while and then becomes permanent". I wondered about that part. The print on the back of the can was way too tiny for me to see w/o my magnifying glass so don't know if it would be good on fabric. I didn't get any but may go back later and get some. I do know that you can use a cut-a-way stabilizer in whatever weight works best for your fabric, adhere it to the applique with 505 and then stitch around it and cut. The cut-a-way is stable once it's stitched. This is the way I do applique with my embroidery machine.

  14. #14
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    using the spray will work, perhaps find a spray with will not wash out, read the labels. Depending on what I am doing, lets say a baby quilt (lots of washing) to a wall hanging (probably no washing) will also determine the method used. Baby Quilt I sould window cut the webbing, wall hanging I would use my Elmers craft spray (cheap)

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