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? about Blocking

? about Blocking

Old 01-06-2012, 08:14 AM
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While reading through threads I have come across a couple that said they needed to block the quilt. I square up every block while making the quilt but I have never heard of blocking the quilt. Cross stitch, needlepoint, yes but not a quilt. Can someone explain.
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Old 01-06-2012, 08:22 AM
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If you get all done and the quilt is not completely square or flat, some people like to block it. This is especially important if it is going into competition. There are many methods to do this. I myself like to wash my quilts before gifting and I get them out of the dryer slightly damp. I spread a clean sheet on the carpet and pin (rust-proof pins)any problem areas down as I block it. I let it dry in that position for a nice flat, square look before flolding. Some people like to just spritz a finished quilt with water and block it. The danger of that however is if the fabrics have not been pre-washed or the quilt washed, you could get a bleed.
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Old 01-06-2012, 08:55 AM
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Blocking is generally done for quilts that will hang, either competition quilts or wall quilts, not so often for bed quilts or quilts that will be washed often. It makes them hang straight, true, flat and square, but only lasts until the quilt gets wet again and then it reverts to its 'natural' state.

Wet blocking, where the quilt is washed or soaked, and dry blocking, where the quilt is sprayed or steamed, are the two main ways to block a quilt.

There are many great tutorials available online and in books, but some of the best are:
Quilt University http://www.quiltuniversity.com/blocking.htm
Leah Day http://www.daystyledesigns.com/blocking.htm
Possibilities Quilts http://www.greatamericanquilt.com/pd...gyourquilt.pdf

Blocking is done before the binding is sewn on so that you can trim the quilt square before attaching the binding. Because blocking only lasts until the next time the quilt gets wet, this final trimming and then binding helps ensure the 'natural' state of the quilt is as accurate as possible.
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Old 01-06-2012, 03:28 PM
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I had never heard of it until just recently. Sharon Schambler had a video on You Tube showing how she does it. Amazing, you learn something every day.
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Old 01-06-2012, 06:30 PM
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If you sew accurately and square up the blocks as you go, I think you can forego the blocking. I have had quilts hanging in Houston and Paducah and I have never blocked any of them. (I also didn't win a ribbon.) I did consider it, but it is really a lot of trouble and you have to have a large area somewhere that you can leave the quilt while it dries. Competition is fun, but I think I wouldn't do it if blocking a quilt was a requirement.
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Old 01-06-2012, 09:59 PM
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sewing perfectly is not related to blocking the quilt...the sandwich itself can lead to some 'wracking'...and the simple technique of washing, staking out on sheet covered carpet, and allowing to dry is easy as pie to do...so why not have it nice and flat? I don't even think it has to be going into competition...i make my quilts for my home and my enjoyment... they look better.. and i ALWAYS block my wallhangings so they hang flat against the wall... and I do spritz with my water bottle, but really only because my washer spins so dry that it doesn't really have quite enough dampness to take out any stubborn wrinkles ... leave to dry and enjoy...
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Old 01-08-2012, 02:32 PM
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Thanks everyone. Now I understand. I may try it on a small wall hanging and see if it makes a difference. I am always learning.
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