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Thread: Adding more quilting after binding?

  1. #1
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    Red face Adding more quilting after binding?

    I can hear the gasps of horror already I've just put the binding on a quilt and am wondering if it needed some more lines of quilting. Can I go back and add them before I wash the quilt? I've found some online discussion that suggests that though this is - ahem - an unconventional thing to do, it's not unheard of or impossible. Would be interested to know what people think.

  2. #2
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    I've done that a time or two. Turned out ok, in fact the friend I made the quilt for said it looked good to her.

  3. #3
    Senior Member jokir44's Avatar
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    No gasping here, I've done it. All you need to do is be careful where and how you start and stop your stitching lines. I assume you mean machine quilting?

  4. #4
    Super Member Sync's Avatar
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    No gasp of horror here ......... I've added quilting with no problems.

  5. #5
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    Gasp!! (Just kidding) I've done it, it worked out well. As jokir44 said, you just have to be a bit more careful where you stop and start, because you can't hide it in the binding.

  6. #6
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    Your quilt, can if you want to.

  7. #7
    Super Member notmorecraft's Avatar
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    Hey your quilt, whatever you want to do.

  8. #8
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    ​I gave done it and it worked out fine. I have even mixed hand quilting, machine quilting and ties, GASP!

  9. #9
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer23 View Post
    Gasp!! (Just kidding) I've done it, it worked out well. As jokir44 said, you just have to be a bit more careful where you stop and start, because you can't hide it in the binding.
    Yes, I was thinking that - but then realised that those lines stop at the border anyway, so I just have to be as careful as I was first time round.

  10. #10
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    I've
    Quote Originally Posted by notmorecraft View Post
    Hey your quilt, whatever you want to do.
    Just wanted to be sure it wouldn't cause some major problem I hadn't thought of.

  11. #11
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    I have done that at least three different times. No problem, in fact I think having the binding there gave it some stability the same way the pins do.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  12. #12
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston1954 View Post
    I have done that at least three different times. No problem, in fact I think having the binding there gave it some stability the same way the pins do.
    When I was researching this earlier, I found a blog post by someone who says that she does some stitch-in-the-ditch quilting, then binds the quilt, then continues with the quilting, for this very reason. It also means she's trimmed her batting and backing, any reduction in size being helpful when using a domestic sewing machine.
    Last edited by annesthreads; 05-25-2017 at 12:06 PM.

  13. #13
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    Thankyou for all the replies. I'm quite surprised and intrigued - till I looked at my finished quilt this afternoon, decided I hadn't done enough quilting on it and asked myself this question, it had never occurred to me that a quilt could be made in any order other than all the quilting followed by binding. I couldn't see any obvious reason why more quilting couldn't be added, and it's great to have had that confirmed here and in other discussions.

  14. #14
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    Absolutely!

  15. #15
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    I'm glad you asked the question. And the timing is as if you'd been in my head an hour ago when I was thinking of posing the very same one. In five years of quilting, I've never quilted more after binding, because I was satisfied. But one quilt I have just very recently done (or so I thought) seems to need more --just a little --in the border. I wondered if doing more quilting would cause puckering or any other problem I hadn't thought of.

  16. #16
    Super Member rryder's Avatar
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    Yep, getting ready to do that myself since I've decided that one of my quilts needs more quilting in the border for stability.

    Rob
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  17. #17
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    It must be something in the air today! I love imagining quilters on different continents all simultaneously deciding, rather belatedly, that their latest quilt needs some more quilting, and thinking "I wonder if..."

  18. #18
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    If I'm planning to quilt the border with a design that needs to be centered down the length of the border, I'll bind the quilt first, and then quilt the border. That way I can make sure that my design is perfectly centered.

  19. #19
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    I am in the process of doing that now. I have made my dear hubby a quilt of valor. Used a panel and pieced blocks. He still does not know anything about it. Have a couple of the pieced blocks to echo stitch and the panel blocks to do highlighting stitching on, it is coming along wonderfully.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Faintly Artistic's Avatar
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    Been there, done that. Quilt didn't explode, catch on fire, or self-destruct

  21. #21
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    I do it all the time too. In that respect, a quilt is never "done"...
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/sewbizgirl
    Boom 20 Album of Blocks I made to swap https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...bums19942.html
    "The reward of a thing well done is having done it." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

  22. #22
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    Yes. The only quilts I've ever had shift at all after pinning had fleece backs. No reason you can't do it with a fabric back.

  23. #23
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    some times we dont quilt with even density, and after binding a tiny mound appears. Adding some more quilting stitches tames that mound flat.

  24. #24
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
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    So I've done it - added several more lines of quilting, and what looked like a rumpled, creased failure last night is now a quilt that I like both look and feel of. It's now washed and pegged out on the line - the weather today is providing me with a natural tumble dryer, as it's very warm and breezy.

    This has been a useful learning experience: it was so much easier to do the extra quilting, with the quilt completely stable and with no pins in it. As I was using a standard domestic sewing machine, it also made a difference to have lost the 4in or so of backing and batting that had been trimmed off each side. And my batting shed slightly, so I was glad to have it out of the way and not leaving fluff on the quilt. I think I'll try doing this again, deliberately next time - do enough basic quilting to stabilise the quilt, then add the binding before finishing the quilting, especially if I want to add any more elaborate flourishes.

    Thanks for all the help!

  25. #25
    Super Member Wanabee Quiltin's Avatar
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    I have done this many times. I had no problems. I have especially done this on vintage quilts where the stitching has come loose. I did read a famous quilter, maybe Trudie Hughes ?, who says she puts the binding on before quilting. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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