Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: alternative to sitd

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    34

    alternative to sitd

    I am teaching myself how to quilt. I am learning alot on this site. As an alternative to sitd, which is the only thing I know how to do, some of you advise to use a serpentine or zigzag stitch. Does this go over both sides of the seam? In other words, do you stitch down the center of the seam so that you are sewing on one layer of fabric on one side and three layers on the other side where you have pressed the seam allowances? Am I making myself clear? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    5,882
    Howdy and welcome, from TX! I've yet to do this (but plan to, very soon) but I'm sure that's the way it's meant to be done. You'd end up with half of the design, on either side of the "ditch." Instead of wobbly, it'll just look kinda fancy!
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  3. #3
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    11,167
    Blog Entries
    1
    you can do it that way if you want- or you can do a decorative stitch across blocks- with nothing to do with the seams- or you can go down the seams it is your choice- batting (density) is dependant on your batting- some batting allows up to 10" between stitching lines- some batts need to be quilted every 2"- 4" if you are using a batt that requires closer stitching you can do cross-hatch lines- or free motion quilting- making designs in your blocks- you can use any decorative stitch your machine offers & sew the decorative stitch where ever you want in your blocks- how ever you want to do it is ok- if you just want to stitch down your seams- as long as they are close enough for the batting you are using you can do that too-
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  4. #4
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    6,109
    Blog Entries
    1
    Here's an example of beautiful serpentine stitching. Click the link for pics.

    http://www.redpepperquilts.com/2010/...oin-quilt.html
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 06-27-2012 at 01:18 PM. Reason: remove copyright image

  5. #5
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    35,480
    Welcome to the board from Southern California!!!
    I like to use a serpentine stitch, centering over the seam line but it goes onto both sides. Can't tell if you are not perfectly centered. I also do a lot of diagonal stitching across the quilt with a fun stitch.



    My newest Grandson, Caleb Austin, was born May 29th. I am now Grandma to 4 precious babies. I am so blessed!!!!

  6. #6
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    I like to center my serpentine stitch over the seam(s), because of the nature of the stitch if you "drift " a bit it really does not show up... it a very forgiving stitch/method . But I also like to use a varigated thread with the serpentine .

  7. #7
    Super Member kitsykeel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Salisbury, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,018
    Peggi,

    Thank you for that link. I have a baby quilt top finished and put it aside because I was tired of doing stitch in the ditch. Not too good at free motion yet (maybe never.) This idea of using the decorative stitching on one of my machines is the way to go. Can't wait to try it. Another UFO bites the dust soon!!!
    Kitsy

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York City/Manhattan
    Posts
    1,324
    also, to make it easier, if you have one, use a walking foot. It feeds the three layers more evenly.

  9. #9
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Fox Valley Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,937
    I have also used other decorative stitches, such as the feather stitch to do my machine quilting. Love the looks. Have never done a really large quilt, as it takes longer, but it is fun to do once in awhile on a lap quilt.

  10. #10
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    8,776
    When I used to quilt on my DSM I had very few choices of decorative stitches. I found stitching right next to the ditch to be a great solution. I varied from 1/8" to 1/4" away from the seam lines using my foot as a guage. I could only do this with smaller size quilts because it involved turning the quilt quite a bit. I wouldn't attempt it with anything much bigger than 60" square. I would also mix in handquilting for the more elaborate designs because I never felt comfortable FMQ on my domestic. Here is a link to a quilt I did both these techniques with:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...ar-t25770.html

  11. #11
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Clay Springs AZ
    Posts
    3,223
    Love the serpentine stitch.
    Did not know you could do it so large. I will have to check my machine to see if it will do it that big.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sweet Home Alabama
    Posts
    3,226
    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    Here's an example of beautiful serpentine stitching. Click the link for pics.

    http://www.redpepperquilts.com/2010/...oin-quilt.html
    Nice site. Love the look of the serpentine stitch going thru the blocks. I'm going to try that.

    I use the serpentine stitch a lot of times. I use the seam line as the guide and the stitching goes over both fabrics. I think it looks nice on lots of quilts. Adds a little interest.

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    109
    An experienced quilting friend of mine had suggested the serpentine stitch for a baby quilt that I am making for my new grandson and I have been practicing on a small quilt sandwich to find the best stitch width and length for my machine. Then I saw that someone recommended AllPeopleQuilt on this site yesterday and I found this: http://www.allpeoplequilt.com/techni...lery_ss12.html
    It says that it's easy enough for a beginner! Good luck with your project and welcome from the Lone Star State.

  14. #14
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    Here's an example of beautiful serpentine stitching. Click the link for pics.

    http://www.redpepperquilts.com/2010/...oin-quilt.html

    This would be a great method for beginners to gain confidence and also produce a nice quilt.

  15. #15
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,665
    I love to combine machine and hand stitching!!!!! Is there an abbreviated name for "next to the ditch", LOL???

    Quote Originally Posted by feline fanatic View Post
    When I used to quilt on my DSM I had very few choices of decorative stitches. I found stitching right next to the ditch to be a great solution. I varied from 1/8" to 1/4" away from the seam lines using my foot as a guage. I could only do this with smaller size quilts because it involved turning the quilt quite a bit. I wouldn't attempt it with anything much bigger than 60" square. I would also mix in handquilting for the more elaborate designs because I never felt comfortable FMQ on my domestic. Here is a link to a quilt I did both these techniques with:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...ar-t25770.html
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  16. #16
    Super Member butterflies5518's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    4,032
    Quote Originally Posted by Peckish View Post
    Here's an example of beautiful serpentine stitching. Click the link for pics.

    http://www.redpepperquilts.com/2010/...oin-quilt.html
    thanks for the link - I never thought outside the box - woohoo new trick learned! Thanks for sharing.
    Quilting makes me happy!..

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Normal, IL
    Posts
    561
    Lots of decorative stitches look really neat elongated or made wider. If you can get ahold of Mary Mashuta's Foolproof Macine Quilting you'll get some terrific ideas and explanations. It's all done with the walking foot.

  18. #18
    Super Member nstitches4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Independence, MO
    Posts
    3,551
    Welcome to the board. I think that is the way it is intended to work. I haven't tried it yet, but I have several Project Linus quilts ready to quilt and I think that would be a quick and easy way to quilt them.

  19. #19
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    ELVERTA, CA
    Posts
    15,170
    Blog Entries
    1
    Foolproof Machine Quilting by Mary Mashuta is a book that I recently bought. She explains how to use your walking foot to create the look of some FMQ-like designs. I'd suggest you go check it out (got mine from Amazon). It helps to expand the quilting skill without actually having to do FMQ.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  20. #20
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    kansas
    Posts
    2,803
    Blog Entries
    37
    You might want to experiment with some FMQ--I'm not great by any means! But will tackle a lap quilt size and have found that I'm getting much better. If you can set your feed dogs down and have an embroidery/FMQ foot, give it a try. I did see a tip recently that REALLY made sense--work so that you are bring the work TOWARD you instead of away--being able to actually see what you've done let's you keep track of where you are with your design. Just did this on a lap quilt and it was so much easier!

  21. #21
    Super Member Marysewfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Somewhere neat!
    Posts
    1,145
    AuntLucy wrote: - (I found this: http://www.allpeoplequilt.com/techni...lery_ss12.html
    It says that it's easy enough for a beginner!) -

    Thank you for that reference, I like that - it just made that look so dressy!

    Marysewfun
    Marysewfun
    Have a great day!

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,928
    It can be done very nicely over the seam, along one side of the seam, and along both sides of the seam. Whatever look you want for the finished quilt.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.