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Thread: Another appliqué question

  1. #1
    Junior Member Daisygirl's Avatar
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    Another appliqué question

    I am currently working on a wall hanging, and I am machine appliquing it. I completed all the flowers, stems and pretty much everything using a blanket stitch. I only have the lettering left to do. My question is this, can I use raw edge appliqué on te letters if I used a blanket stitch on everything else? I know there are no quilting was that I would be breaking, but would it look okay?
    Do what you love, love what you do!

  2. #2
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    You may want to use invisible threa.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I think it would look fine! Would distinguish the lettering from the blossoms.

  4. #4
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I think it would look fine.

  5. #5
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    The nice part of doing raw edge with invisible thread is if you decide you don't like it you don't have to take it out before you do blanket stitching.

  6. #6
    Super Member Knitette's Avatar
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    I'm confused

    It might be a language thing, but I thought 'raw edge appliqué' was a technique - using a fusible and sewing round the edges by machine with either a straight, zig-zag, blanket or satin stitch (the other main appliqué method being 'needle-turn').

    If the OP is doing her hanging by this technique (raw-edge machine), what does the question, 'raw-edge or blanket stitch' mean? I understood blanket stitch to be one of the methods of raw-edge?

    Could someone explain please? TIA
    Lang may yer lum reek. (I'm a knitter - hence - 'Knit-ette'. Confuses a lot of people!)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knitette View Post
    If the OP is doing her hanging by this technique (raw-edge machine), what does the question, 'raw-edge or blanket stitch' mean? I understood blanket stitch to be one of the methods of raw-edge?
    I have this same question. I thought raw-edge meant you didn't turn the edges over. Blanket stitch can be used on raw edge or turned edge, as can a number of other sew down method.

    I'd love to know what this raw edge 'stitch' is.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Scraplady's Avatar
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    Sometimes "raw edge applique" refers to a technique where you would stitch maybe 1/8" to 1/4" in from the edge of the applique to secure it, then leave the actual cut edge to fray with use and washing, kind of like the edges of the blocks on a rag quilt. Is that what you mean? If it's a wall hanging, it wouldn't see much washing, but you can always fray the edges of the letters with a soft toothbrush after they're sewn down, if that's the look you're after.
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  9. #9
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knitette View Post
    I'm confused

    It might be a language thing, but I thought 'raw edge appliqué' was a technique - using a fusible and sewing round the edges by machine with either a straight, zig-zag, blanket or satin stitch (the other main appliqué method being 'needle-turn').

    If the OP is doing her hanging by this technique (raw-edge machine), what does the question, 'raw-edge or blanket stitch' mean? I understood blanket stitch to be one of the methods of raw-edge?

    Could someone explain please? TIA
    Raw edge leaves the edge of the applique unfinished. Blanket stitch, zig-zag or satin stitch finishes the edge of the applique.

  10. #10
    Super Member Knitette's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Raw edge leaves the edge of the applique unfinished. Blanket stitch, zig-zag or satin stitch finishes the edge of the applique.
    OK - if that's 'raw edge', what's the latter method called?
    Lang may yer lum reek. (I'm a knitter - hence - 'Knit-ette'. Confuses a lot of people!)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Blanket stitch, zig-zag or satin stitch finishes the edge of the applique.
    I guess I would disagree with this. A tight satin stitch will finish the edge, but a blanket stitch or a loose zig zag on an unturned applique will still leave threads showing, and to me, that is raw edge still unless the ends are turned under.

    But thank you for explaining how it is viewed by others.

    (I also appreciate the notion of sewing inside the applique shape, purposefully leaving the edges to fray. That makes sense too.

  12. #12
    Junior Member Daisygirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scraplady View Post
    Sometimes "raw edge applique" refers to a technique where you would stitch maybe 1/8" to 1/4" in from the edge of the applique to secure it, then leave the actual cut edge to fray with use and washing, kind of like the edges of the blocks on a rag quilt. Is that what you mean? If it's a wall hanging, it wouldn't see much washing, but you can always fray the edges of the letters with a soft toothbrush after they're sewn down, if that's the look you're after.


    Well I learned something we today, thought raw edge meant sewing the appliqué like scrap lady explained. I usually do hand turned but I wanted something quick. Thank you everyone for answering my post. Have a lovely evening!
    Do what you love, love what you do!

  13. #13
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    I guess I would disagree with this. A tight satin stitch will finish the edge, but a blanket stitch or a loose zig zag on an unturned applique will still leave threads showing, and to me, that is raw edge still unless the ends are turned under.

    But thank you for explaining how it is viewed by others.

    (I also appreciate the notion of sewing inside the applique shape, purposefully leaving the edges to fray. That makes sense too.
    When I do blanket stitch the edge stitch is right on the edge of the applique. My machine does a stitch forward and one backward and then forward again so it has three threads right on the edge of the applique.

    I have seen and heard fusible applique done with satin stitch or blanket stitch just called fusible applique.

  14. #14
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    I was always under the impression that raw edge meant that it would fray, giving it a feathered look. If that is what you want then go for it, the quilt police are on sabbatical. If it were me I would the blanket stitch on the lettering also or the invisible thread. I don't like the frayed look, but that what makes the world interesting. If we all liked the same things how boring.
    BettyGee, quilter on a Rocky Mountain High

  15. #15
    Super Member BettyGee's Avatar
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    Just saw another post, satin stitch around the lettering would really set it off.
    BettyGee, quilter on a Rocky Mountain High

  16. #16
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    I think it's absolutely fine, using either matching thread to the fabric or invisible thread. It's your quilt - your rules.

  17. #17
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    In answer to Knitette, blanket stitch, zig-zag or satin stitch are methods to finish the edge to prevent raveling. Raw edge means you have done nothing to keep the edges from raveling and they will ravel every time the quilt is washed or if it is "brushed" to make the edges ravel.

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    Hi, I started patchwork and quilting before names were given, we just did whatever worked for us. I was pleasantly surprised when I was told that I was doing needle turn applique, I had been adding a flower and poking the edges under.

  19. #19
    Senior Member maxnme01's Avatar
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    Raw edge applique is created by NOT USING FUSIBLE WEB to apply your applique to the foundation, OR cutting the fusible web smaller all around so that the edge of the fabric can "fray" and leave a fuzzy raggedy look around the edge. You would stitch approx. 1/4 inch in from the edge so that the edge of the fabric IS NOT attached to the foundation. Is that clearer? It makes for a creative way to applique and create texture, especially around flower edges. It's sort of a 3D look.
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  20. #20
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyGee View Post
    I was always under the impression that raw edge meant that it would fray, giving it a feathered look. If that is what you want then go for it, the quilt police are on sabbatical. If it were me I would the blanket stitch on the lettering also or the invisible thread. I don't like the frayed look, but that what makes the world interesting. If we all liked the same things how boring.
    I have never had raw edge (straight stitch right next to the edge) fray. Most of the really intricate applique patterns are done with that technique and I've never seen any of it fray. (think McKenna Ryan)

  21. #21
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    Should be fine, you could do a small sample of the two to see how you like it

  22. #22
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    funny how one person is taught (or just told) one thing and they believe they are RIGHT PERIOD! lots of discussion about what is raw edge & what is not... some of us were taught- raw edge was an easy- technique where you can use fusible or not and then machine stitch- with what ever stitch/method you choose- the edges are not turned under (hence 'raw edge') or you can hand applique- "needle turn" where the edges are not 'raw' they are turned under and the stitches are made in the fold- how you choose to finish your raw edges are your choice- there are lots of options- zigzag, blanket stitch, straight stitch, satin stitch, other decorative stitch...anything goes. don't be 'the quilt police' and demand only YOU have it right- there are many, many different techniques- with new ones coming up all the time- plain & simple- difference - raw edge- edges not turned under- finished edge - edges turned under.
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  23. #23
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    The nice part of doing raw edge with invisible thread is if you decide you don't like it you don't have to take it out before you do blanket stitching.
    This is a great point!
    Debbie
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