Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Another Rag Quilt Question

  1. #1
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1,759

    Another Rag Quilt Question

    I've never made a rag quilt. What stops me is the idea of all that "fuzz" in my sewer line. I washed all of my "I spy" fabrics before using them. Being all cotton, they frayed. Eventually, it stopped up my sewer line at the washing machine (not the whole house). What the guy pulled out of the line looked like mop strings. Since then, when I wash my fabrics, I put them in lingerie bags, which seems to have solved the problem.

    With a rag quilt, you get all that fuzz that wouldn't be contained in a lingerie bag. Doesn't it stop up your washing machine?

    bkay

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    North-East England
    Posts
    424
    Although I have not experienced the sort of blockages you describe I appreciate what you say about your fabric fraying.

    When I pre-wash fabric - usually fat quarters - I put them in a pillowcase with safety pins in the corners to stop the fabric getting too creased. As the pillowcases are white (or used to be!) I can also see if there is any colour loss.

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Beautiful BC
    Posts
    1,792
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have made several rag quilts. I am on city sewer not septic, I may do this differently if I was on septic.

    My machine (top loader) has a soak cycle that fills, agitates, but does not drain. I run an old strainer through the water quite a few times to scoop out the frayed bits. Then I reset the cycle, without draining. I do this 3-4 times until there is much less lint. Finally I run it through the whole wash cycle. If I am nearby I will stop the machine and strain again.

    When it does into the dryer, I have to clean the lint trap several more times.

    I do not use fabric softener.

    If I was on septic, I would do the above, but also disconnect the drain hose from the drain line and run it outside through a strainer or an old pair of pantyhose doubled up, onto the ground. I would not use any detergent.

    I have to clean out my washing machine by wiping down the drum as there will be more lint sticking to it. My old washer had a filter I could clean out, but this one does not.

    I do know some people take them to the laundromat. But the ones here only have front loading machines and I do not think it would work as well for ragging.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  4. #4
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    13,715
    I've made several rag quilts and I prewash all my fabric, yet I've never had the problem you describe. Maybe I've just been lucky?

  5. #5
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    15,687
    Blog Entries
    1
    We are on a well and I have a front loader so I had the same concerns. The last (I should say Last) rag quilt I made, I held it on my lap on a hard board. Then I spritzed the seams with water and brushed the dickens out of each seam using a stiff-bristled brush. I couldn't believe the amount of thread/fuzz that came out. It's a method I would use again IF I were to make another (which is unlikely). I think it's called a Chenille Brush.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-25-2018 at 08:13 AM. Reason: remove shouting/all caps

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop Forum
    Posts
    4,098
    When I pre wash fabric which isn't often(usually for garment making) I sew the cut edges together with a narrow zigzag or my serger then when it's washed/dried I just cut the sewn edge off. No fraying strings left in the washer/dryer and I only lose about a half inch of the fabric cutting off the sewn edge so it's worth the effort to me. I haven't yet made a rag quilt but I've used flannel for several backings and this is also what I did with the flannel.

    Cari

  7. #7
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    18,631
    Blog Entries
    2
    actually if it is clean, just soak it if you have a top loader. then spin and put in dryer. all the fuzz will be in the dryer filter. i check it a few times during drying.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,102
    For years, I have used sink strainers in the laundry tub that the washer drains into. These strainers are stainless fine mesh screens moulded to slump downward into the drain about an inch. They come in different sized widths so have them for every drain in the house except the shower. I have bought them at a hardware store and at a grocery store in an area that was predominantly asian. If I am washing something that leaves a lot of lint, I clean the strainer frequently. I had a front loader and did not notice any difference in what drained out than what does from the top-loading Speed Queen. I've used the old nylon on the end of the drain hose and had it stop up frequently, filled for about 6 inches with lint.

  9. #9
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    2,944
    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    I've made several rag quilts and I prewash all my fabric, yet I've never had the problem you describe. Maybe I've just been lucky?
    Prewashing isn't the problem for me. However, once the top is made I only wet it, then take it to the local laundromat to barely dry and fluff a lot. I found I had to often remove the lint manually. This was no big problem.
    A story: the first time I took one to the laundromat a small foreign woman kept saying "is broke!" as I kept removing the lint. She did get to see the final product and smiled.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    5,396
    Blog Entries
    1
    I've made quilt sized ones and I've always washed them and had no problem but I live in the city so it may be a difference in the piping system. I think the washed ones looks do much nicer plus if any threads break or seams you'll know in advance. You could wash it in a bucket/pan of water or take it to the laundry mat. They can also be made with fleece which will curl but not fray, it looks super cute. Denim jean fabric also works well but may have the same problems with the fraying. this time of the year fleece is on sale really cheap. I keep a lot of quilt blocks made for a last minute gift. I use my Accu cut machine. If you cut the fringe before sewing them together, which is what I did since I did it on my cutter you could wash the squares in a mesh bag and it might be easier.
    Judy

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    5,396
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Cari-in-Oly View Post
    When I pre wash fabric which isn't often(usually for garment making) I sew the cut edges together with a narrow zigzag or my serger then when it's washed/dried I just cut the sewn edge off. No fraying strings left in the washer/dryer and I only lose about a half inch of the fabric cutting off the sewn edge so it's worth the effort to me. I haven't yet made a rag quilt but I've used flannel for several backings and this is also what I did with the flannel.

    Cari
    The difference for her doing the rag quilt, is the fraying after cutting the blocks. I also wash my flannel in advance but that only effects the outside edges of the yardage, once you cut the blocks you have fresh edges (4 per block) to worry about. But prewashing does help get the shrinkage out of the way and makes the threads a little more dense to minimize the fraying.
    Judy

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    179
    I have never had this problem. I use flannel, which is not prewashed. After making the rag quilt, I wash it in warm (not hot) water. I put it in the dryer with one TOWEL. About half-way through the drying cycle, I open the dryer and clean the lint filter then finish drying. You can do this sooner and more often if you want. The towel collects some, too, which is why I use it. Later, i just shake out the towel and wash it. This technique works very well for me.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    20
    I’ve made several rag quilts from flannel. A few years ago the local laundromats started posting signs of “no rag quilts” because the lint was killing their washing machines. So for the first two or three times of washing this is what I do ... take an old sheet and sew up 3 sides .. put your quilt in the “sheet bag” and sew the sheet bag shut. Wash in your washer. Take it out of the washer, go outside and use scissors to cut one seam open. Shake the dickens out of your quilt and pull out the big clumps of strings from your bag. Put the quilt back in the bag and sew it shut. Wash again. After the wash, again take it out, shake shake shake, etc. Put it in the dryer and set a timer for 10 minutes .. every 10 minutes clean out your dryer lint trap. After drying, take it outside and again shake shake shake and pick off any big clumps of strings ... now you should be able to wash it again without the sheet bag ... then dry checking your lint trap every 15/20 minutes. If your rag quilt is strictly cotton you should only have to wash once in the sheet bag ... if it’s from homespun fabric you’ll probably need the bag 3 times. That’s my personal experience anyway.

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1,759
    Thanks, guys. The stopped up drain was from many washing 1/4 to 1/3 yard pieces of I spy fabric when I first started swapping. Now, I buy 1 yard pieces and use them in more than one swap, so I don't have as many cut edges.

    Thanks again. I have the fabric for a flannel quilt, but I don't think I'm going to make it a rag quilt. That sounds like a pain in the tush.

    bkay

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    226
    Take it to a laundry and use the BIG machine that washes 6 loads at one time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.