Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Main
Any Suggestions on how to quilt an Attic Window Quilt? >

Any Suggestions on how to quilt an Attic Window Quilt?

Any Suggestions on how to quilt an Attic Window Quilt?

Old 11-14-2020, 09:14 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: The Woodlands, Texas
Posts: 608
Default Any Suggestions on how to quilt an Attic Window Quilt?

I am struggling to find an example of quilting an Attic Window quilt except for an "all over" design. I'd like to keep the 3D effect. Thanks in advance!
Sheri.a is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 06:04 AM
  #2  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Michigan Thumb
Posts: 1,785
Default

Can you post a picture so we can give better comments. Without seeing your top, I would stitch in the ditch around the frames and then some free-motion around what is in the windows.
farmquilter is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 07:03 AM
  #3  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 39,101
Default

It depends on what is in the window. I have seen lines done in the frame to reinforce the L shape and then in the window outline quilted around the items to meander.
Tartan is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 08:19 AM
  #4  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Near Seattle, WA
Posts: 4,418
Default

I think it would help to see your proportions and colors and such. If your blocks are small enough and square enough the actual "window" fabrics might not need any quilting.

I have an attic window top with fairly large (postcard sized/shaped) rectangles and it also has sashing. So far I'm planning on a scroll design in the black sashing, probably something linear and simple in the grey (so just echo the line 1/4" away from the ditch on both sides, and then we come to the rectangle...

I'm thinking a simple oval inside each postcard would hold things down and be sufficient quilting without distracting, while giving each block the same amount of quilting. I might connect with the diagonal lines, stitching in the ditch in the greys. I am trying for a specific look, think of the old scrap albums with the black pages.

https://www.quiltingboard.com/member...14-621650.html
Iceblossom is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 09:15 AM
  #5  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Near Seattle, WA
Posts: 4,418
Default

Came back too late to edit, but here's a (very) rough draft of what I'm thinking. I think my postcard is a little short in my non-measured version.

The quilting down is the thorn in my process. It's not how I think, it's not how I work, and I got spoiled when I had a long arm available to me!

The scrollwork would look more like something from an award certificate (I want a combination of swirlys and points) and should be pretty easy to FMQ. Both the ovals and the scrolls I'll have to mark, just because I FMQ doesn't mean I can freehand it! I am trying to find ways to make this work with my domestic machine and I think this is doable. Most likely my first step will be to grid the black lines with black thread fully in the ditch to hold everything down. I'm not sure if the scroll work in the sashing will be with black thread or not... Then I will probably switch to a battleship gray to mostly blend in. The gray stitching will be stop/start I think with the walking foot. With my size of blocks the large oval with a bit of a meander around it will not interfere with the large prints and be adequate quilting spacing, but the oval will still be relatively large and unquilted.
Attached Thumbnails postcard.jpg  
Iceblossom is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 11:39 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: The Woodlands, Texas
Posts: 608
Default

Thanks for your help - here is the quilt. To explain the blue in the top right - It's the winter land where the ice fairies live :-) .
Attached Thumbnails fairy-quilt.jpg  

Last edited by Sheri.a; 11-15-2020 at 11:44 AM. Reason: add information
Sheri.a is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 12:20 PM
  #7  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Mendocino Coast, CA
Posts: 2,981
Default

Very pretty! I love how you incorporated fairy/fantasy figures in the window panes. I'm currently using a wood grain quilting design and I'm really liking how it is coming out. It might be a good design for the, "wooden" parts of the quilt, like between the panes and the window sill and frame. I don't have any printed pattern. I just looked at some wood and drew something similar on the quilt with washable marker, then stitched over that. It's pretty easy and can be done with a straight stitch and reverse stitch on a regular, domestic machine. No need for FMQ. Good luck! It looks really nice, so far.

Iceblossom, I love your quilt too. The travel postcard theme is a good one!

Last edited by tropit; 11-15-2020 at 12:23 PM.
tropit is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 01:23 PM
  #8  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Near Seattle, WA
Posts: 4,418
Default

I was wondering if the quilt was one of the panel type ones, those are super hard for me to figure a quilting design for, I think the wood grain option works with many of them, along with similar designs that can look like water ripples or clouds.

I know you are looking for something other than all-over, but I think snowflakes could be very nice all over. Whether an all-over meander like this one:
https://www.urbanelementz.com/deb-s-...s-meander.html
or maybe more linear like this one:
https://www.urbanelementz.com/snowfl...d-ribbons.html

You can also construct vertical/horizontal designs doing half on a line going one way and half on a line going the other -- I know, something that would make more sense if I just drew it out.

You could reinforce the grid and only do the meander type in the blocks and still be able to skip from block to block pretty easily with a long arm.

Often the quilting I wish to do is fancier than I can draw and with my vision issues I have problems following markings on the fabric. I will buy parchment paper at the dollar store and copy a pantograph pattern onto the paper with pencil and then either quilt through the pencil or "presew/paper punch" the lines and following the dots. Yes, you have to do extra work to trace everything and then yes, you have to take off the paper, but that's what I need to do when doing a complex design over a heavily patterned surface.
Iceblossom is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 04:39 PM
  #9  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: kansas
Posts: 6,322
Default

I just finished a friend's so no picture, but I did just straight line on the very narrow (1") window sashings, did a wood design on the outer window frame (with piano keys on the Very wide borders that were different sizes) and then just tried to follow the design of the panel she used, just basically outlining and switching thread colors often. I didn't outline every single line, but enough to hold it all together easily.
quiltingshorttimer is offline  
Old 11-15-2020, 06:19 PM
  #10  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Illinois
Posts: 241
Default

I recently did a picture quilt with a mountain scene w/ eagles, waterfalls, etc. All of my quilting was free motion outlining the scenes behind the window.. I stayed with the colors so that you really can't tell there is a lot of quilting. It just sort of kept the quilt in order. I did do just enough quilting in the ditch along the window frame to hold everything together. Actually, when I finished the window I liked it so well without any quilting that I tried to get along with the least amount necessary. The "window" is hanging in my living room and there is enough quilting ( in my opinion).I feel the same way about your fairies. I am not a fan of heavy quilting and particularly when the quilt it really attractive as your is.
redbreast is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter


SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.