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Thread: Anyone remember this way of quilting?

  1. #26
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    We do this method for our children's charity quilts at guild. The turning (birthing) process itself causes the layers to shift, and we must be careful to pat everything in place afterwards. They are not easy to machine quilt, but some people do ok with it. We tie a lot of them.

    The positive aspect of this is the shorter time it takes to make a quilt this way. If you are going to cut off the edges and put a binding on it anyway, why not just layer it the normal way and save the stitching around and turning?

    Dayle

  2. #27
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    I like the birthing/pillowcase method for small items & have used it up to crib size but the larger the item--the more chance it will be lumpy or get stretched out of shape. I've never heard of cutting off the edge & binding it, though.
    Beverly

  3. #28
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
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    I've heard of birthing and was thinking of using it on my latest quilt, but wondering about the diagonal basting. If you do that, you can't turn it, can you?
    Krystyna
    Feel the fear and do it anyway!

  4. #29
    Senior Member bobquilt3's Avatar
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    I am allergic to many of the battings so I layer my quilt, pin it thoroughly and sew the binding on. This way I don't have to deal with exposed batting while I am quilting. The optimum phrase here is "pin it thoroughly" because if I rush I can have a less than stellar back when I'm done. I think if I turned it over and checked the back more thoroughly and basted before I quilted it I would have fewer problems. Unfortunately that is a very big "if" because I am always in a hurry. LOL

    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I remember taking a class years ago and the instructor did her quilting just opposite of what most do now. She layered her quilt and turned it, she called it birthing the quilt. She basted the quilt with long running stitches from side to side and top to bottom then diagonal both ways. She then machine quilted the quilt and had no puckers or poofs. She then trimmed off the seam from the turning and added a binding. I'm sure she had a book she wrote, I remember her signing some. I didn't buy one as I was addicted to crochet at the time. LOL

  5. #30
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    I did my first one last week - a crib quilt. I enjoyed it so much, I have 3 more ready to go!

  6. #31
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    I had a problem figuring out the "layering", "turning", and "basting", until i figured out it is done in that order. But no one has said how to do the layering. I have been doing this since the 50's. Talk about old! You need to place the top and back right sides together. The batt probably goes next to the top. If you want to baste at this point, that would be fine. But then you sew all around the outside leaving a few inches open for turning. Then you need to remove the basting in order to turn it.

    Another way that we used to do was to sew just the top and back together, right sides together, leaving quite a large turning space. Turn it and then work the WOOL batting inside, trying to get it into the edges and corners all around. Doesn't sound like fun, does it. But we did it. Then they were tied with wool yarn. These quilts were not washed. If the top got too soiled, you took off the ties, opened the last seam and washed just the top and back. If the batt was bad, it went to the woolen mill to be recarded. Our quilts were not made for show, just for warmth.

  7. #32
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
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    She then trimmed off the seam from the turning and added a binding. I'm sure she had a book she wrote, I remember her signing some. I didn't buy one as I was addicted to crochet at the time. LOL[/QUOTE]

    I "birthed" a quilt once, but I didn't "trim off the seam from the turning, and add a binding". I may try that. I guess it would look more like a quilt finished in the traditional way, if you trimmed the seams and bound it. I think I just turned it and top stitched all around it.

  8. #33
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    This works great for making little quilted coasters.
    :-)
    CAS

  9. #34
    Super Member icon17's Avatar
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    I'm a 'Linus Project' member here in Washington ST. thats How We do The Quilts!
    Lay down Batting, lay down Backing, Lay down TOP Face Down with Enough Batting, Backing, for About 1.5 to 2 inch extra around the TOP Pin All around Leaving a small OPEN SPACE. Cut ALL Around the Quilt TOP, Sew 1/2 to 1 inch Seam Allownce Leaving OPEN Space To TURN Quilt/Birth. (Called Envelope) Then Sew Around the Quilt Again 1/2 to 1 inch inside the Edges and Tie with Yarn/Heavy thread.
    May Your Life Be Full of Charity and Love.

  10. #35
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    Eleanor Burns of Quilt IN A Day did that on t.v. and always went right to her machine and started quilting it. now i know she would have had puckers since she didn't take time to smooth it out well. I did it once on a king size and tied that one. I would never try to machine quilt it. i have enough trouble. but for tying, it is fast and easy. no binding.

  11. #36
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    I use this method while teaching a first timer to quilt. This is because I only see the person for 2 hours once a week and most time for only 2 weeks. It is a temperory home for homeless pregnant women and they are moved on to a more permanant home. This way they can finish the quilt and take it with them.

  12. #37
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    I have an Aunt that does all her quilts this way. I have tried to talk her into doing a binding, but she just won't try it.

  13. #38
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    Not sure if I can explain this clearly...I've done this on a couple quilts. One of them, my sister had pieced the back, but it was so nice on the back, I didn't want to trim any of it, so I layered it...right sides together and batting on top...stitched the sides together and turned it. Because the back was a bit bigger, it wrapped around the sides when I turned it. I just layed it flat, made it even on both sides, pinned the edges and loaded it on my long-arm frame. When it was done, it had to only be bound on the top and bottom because the sides were already done. I quilted it all the way to the edges and it turned out really well, nothing wasted and it was completely reversible.

    It's a little fussy to quilt it on the big frame, but it was fun and she didn't have to cut into her design to finish it. Before I had the big machine, I always used the pillowcase method and tied the quilt with yarn.

  14. #39
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by piepatch View Post
    She then trimmed off the seam from the turning and added a binding. I'm sure she had a book she wrote, I remember her signing some. I didn't buy one as I was addicted to crochet at the time. LOL
    I "birthed" a quilt once, but I didn't "trim off the seam from the turning, and add a binding". I may try that. I guess it would look more like a quilt finished in the traditional way, if you trimmed the seams and bound it. I think I just turned it and top stitched all around it.[/QUOTE]

    I still don't see any benefit in trimming the edge after turning a quilt inside out.
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  15. #40
    Super Member G'ma Kay's Avatar
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    I used to do baby quilts similar to this way. I always used a ruffle on the edge. I always hand quilted, usually around whatever print I was using, the teddy bears, the hearts, the trains, etc. I didn't trim the seam, obviously, and I didn't bind either. I just made a stitch 1/2 inch inside the edge.

  16. #41
    Senior Member ShabbyTabby's Avatar
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    I do most of my quilts that way. Most are tied but have done a couple with decorative stitches on my Viking and it worked just fine.
    Families are like old quilts....although they tend to unravel at times...each can be stitched back together with love.

  17. #42
    Super Member duckydo's Avatar
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    That is the Eleanor Burns method, I never had any luck not getting wrinkles... but I do remember

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    MOST of my quilts are done that way-----------at least the baby quilts and personal size quilts. One on my sewing table this very instant. But "birthing" as a name for turning them inside out bothers me to no end. Don't know why----------just does.
    We always called "birthing a quilt" when top, batting and backing were basted together and ready to be quilted.

  19. #44
    Super Member Pickles's Avatar
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    I have done this method , but I also put binding around it without cutting it off as I felt it gave it more
    support around the edges as that is what wears out usually on a quilt first, I did tie the quilt .
    May you always have Love to Share , Health to Spare, and Friends that Care!

  20. #45
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    I have birthed several quilts, then quilted them. They came out fine. In the 70's I saw Eleanor Burns do one and tie it and I made several like that as well, but I like them better quilted.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  21. #46
    Super Member katesnanna's Avatar
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    I've just Googled Fran Roen and there are heaps of sites to look at. Good Luck

  22. #47
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    I do this on quilts for the kids and then machine quilt them on my long arm, I like the edge as is and don't trim or bind it. Great for baby or kid quilts. Even did a scalloped edge double wedding ring. I don't baste but do pin to keep the batting from shifting to the bottom.
    http://ozarkcastle.blogspot.com/

  23. #48
    Super Member Tink's Mom's Avatar
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    I do most of my baby quilts that way...and sometimes even throws...It works a bit easier for me.
    Tink's Mom (My name is really Susie)

  24. #49
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    I did one that way. It was a quilt top with fleece backing(no batting). I turned it right side out, tied it, sewed about 1/2 inch around the edge and it was done. It has held up well.

  25. #50
    Junior Member Janie67's Avatar
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    I complete baby quilts for my quilt guild in this manner to avoid time consuming binding. It works well and I machine quilt usually straight line or stitch in the ditch. I have also used on king or queen size without any difficulty except the wear and tear on your arms wrestling all that fabric around. Lol

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