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Thread: Anyone remember this way of quilting?

  1. #51
    Super Member wendiq's Avatar
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    I belonged to a group that did this for charity quilts. The biggest problem was if the top and back were not properly squared......ended up frequently with puckers on the back. Still, it is quick and allowed us to finished a great many more than if we had tried to do it the traditional way. Funny, but most people did not want to go past "the top". IMHO, the work begins AFTER the top is done....

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrannieAnnie View Post
    MOST of my quilts are done that way-----------at least the baby quilts and personal size quilts. One on my sewing table this very instant. But "birthing" as a name for turning them inside out bothers me to no end. Don't know why----------just does.
    I don't like the term either.

  3. #53
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    I only did one quilt with that method...decided I would rather take the time to baste and quilt and bind the quilt...it just looks better to me.

  4. #54
    Junior Member Pattycakes's Avatar
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    Birthing a quilt.

    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I remember taking a class years ago and the instructor did her quilting just opposite of what most do now. She layered her quilt and turned it, she called it birthing the quilt. She basted the quilt with long running stitches from side to side and top to bottom then diagonal both ways. She then machine quilted the quilt and had no puckers or poofs. She then trimmed off the seam from the turning and added a binding. I'm sure she had a book she wrote, I remember her signing some. I didn't buy one as I was addicted to crochet at the time. LOL
    I seen Eleanor Burns do this technique on her Alminac quilt series. In this quilt series she showed two ways of quilting or sandwiching a quilt. It was cool.

    http://quiltinaday.com/theater/quilt...almanac13.html

    This is the site that showes how they are both done. Hope everyone enjoys

    Have a nice day!
    Quilting Mad in Mansfield, Ohio
    Patty

  5. #55
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    LOL I thought I had invented this method in 1977. We were snowbound and to amuse the seven-year-old I suggested we make a quilt featuring his art. Snowbound! We had to use what was on hand: polyester double-knits, batting remnant, flannel and transfer crayons for synthetics. He picked the square sizes and colors and worked all day on pictures. I heat-set the colors, set the blocks with red strips (more double-knit) and layered the quilt. It was so thick and puffy I thought it would be impossible to bind so stitched the layers outside in and turned it, stitched the opening and we tied it with yarn. With this (and later quilts) the trick was to keep the backing taut and fullness in the batt and top. When turned this resulted in the top slightly rolling to the back on all sides. I've done it on crib and single sizes but never on a full. BTW the fabric and colors of the double knit and the transfers are as bright as when made.

  6. #56
    Senior Member Quiltlady330's Avatar
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    I've done something similar but never trimmed off the seam and added a binding. It was usually to tie it (not my favorite method but sometimes the one of choice for certain projects) and so we left the side seam like a pillowcase would be and stitched one end closed.

  7. #57
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    please explain what birting a quilt is for us that that dont know. is there a picture oe tutorial I have never heard of this sounds interresting.

  8. #58
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I only do this when I make a biscuit quilt. I sew a piping around turn , tie it and sew the opeing. I like doing my quilts as I have always done, the traditional way and sewing on a binding.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by moedersaar View Post
    please explain what birting a quilt is for us that that dont know. is there a picture oe tutorial I have never heard of this sounds interresting.
    I will try and explain- hope my directions are clear- If you have ever made a pillow case or a long tube that you sew the right sides together and leave on end open . then turn this inside out - the quilt top and bottom of the quilt are placed right sides of fabric together with the batting on top of one of these, sew around three of the sides and part of the other side, so you are securing the batting, top and backing together then turn this inside out through the opening you left, and sewing that part together. Then you have the quilt with the right sides of fabric on the outside and the batting is inside - this is what everyone is talking about - I too dislike the term birthing, prefer the pillow case term. (If you have a pillow case that is turned wrong when washed and you turn it inside out when you dry it, this is the same thing only you are doing this to a quilt and putting the batting on either the top or bottom, sewing and turning it.) Hope this makes sense it's the only way I know to explain it.

  10. #60
    Senior Member GramMER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I remember taking a class years ago and the instructor did her quilting just opposite of what most do now. She layered her quilt and turned it, she called it birthing the quilt. She basted the quilt with long running stitches from side to side and top to bottom then diagonal both ways. She then machine quilted the quilt and had no puckers or poofs. She then trimmed off the seam from the turning and added a binding. I'm sure she had a book she wrote, I remember her signing some. I didn't buy one as I was addicted to crochet at the time. LOL
    I have not seen anyone sew around the quilt and then turn it, but it sounds completely logical to me! I have just finished a back and front of a single bed quilt and could easily have done it that way before quilting it. My back was pieced as well as my front and I was very carefull to make sure both sides were measured exactly. I used repeats of 8" blocks. When I layered it, they sides, top and bottom came out evenly. Then I began to worry that I should add a border to the back for a LA quilter's sake. My next fear was that the border added to the back might accidentally show when it was finished and I surely did not want that. What you describe sounds like the best way to do it. It certainly couldn't hurt anything.
    GramMER to eighteen, plus two great-granddaughters and four adopted greats soon we hope!

  11. #61
    Senior Member LisaGibbs's Avatar
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    My mom in law just gave me a bunch of old quilt magazines and I read about this but could not make heads or tails of it since I have been learning to quilt the more traditional ways. I do know that the cheaper templates make much easier work with a rotary cutter than cutting out with scissors and paper templates--LOL. Not to mention having to resize pieces because full size patterns were not something they printed.
    Lisa Gibbs

  12. #62
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    Oh, I forgot to add, when I use this method, i round the corners because I haven't been able to get a decent sharp point after turning.

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