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Thread: Basic block question

  1. #1
    Junior Member QuiltedCritterLady's Avatar
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    Basic block question

    I am working on this block to be the center square for a memory quilt for a friend who was recently diagnosed with inoperable cancer. I am still fairly new (obviously) to quilting and don't know what I did wrong on the background. I wanted an 8" block (8 1/2") finished size. What should I have done differently? I think I ran across a formula for this type of block at one point, but I can't seem to find it. Can one of you please share that with me?
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  2. #2
    Junior Member QuiltedCritterLady's Avatar
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    Sorry, I didn't explain that very well ... the size is fine, but I would have been happier with the corners of the light blue not cut off and I don't know how to construct that diagonal square.
    Never underestimate the power of a woman with a sewing machine!

  3. #3
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    YOU NEEDED A LARGER CENTER SQUARE; HAS TO HAVE 1/4" BEYOND THOSE POINTS. (I didn't mean to be in caps)

    I'd fixed the remaining blocks but leave this one as is - it looks fine, and you can think of it as your Amish block
    The Amish make an intentional mistake in their quilts. Only God is perfect.

  4. #4
    Junior Member QuiltedCritterLady's Avatar
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    Thanks, wow you are fast. Okay, larger center square. But isn't there some way to figure the corner squares in relation to the center square? I know it isn't the same size, but I don't know how to figure the corner squares (the dark blue ones on this).
    Never underestimate the power of a woman with a sewing machine!

  5. #5
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    From a different point of view....I sort of like it with the corners cut off.... I know, that doesn't answer your question, but then, I don't know the answer. I am sure someone here will.

    Dina

  6. #6
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    The block sort of has the feeling that it is going somewhere, not closed in. And of course, the Amish answer always works.
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  7. #7
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Actually, you needed larger triangles.

    Instead of doing a lot of calculations, I simply cut the triangle units a couple of inches larger than necessary. I find the center of the triangle side (usually fold in half and iron in the halfway mark) and do the same on the center square (find the center of the side and iron in the fold). I match the center points and sew the triangle on, iron, and then use a large ruler to cut the triangle down to the correct size. This works for side triangles when assembling a large quilt of on-point squares also.

    Edit: Found this website for the math:
    http://quiltville.com/onpointmath.shtml

    The math you need is the corner triangle directions (first ones on the page). Instead of using that exact math, I just make the squares bigger. For example, instead of adding on 7/8ths of an inch I would add on at least an inch, and probably more like 2 inches (just in case!).
    Last edited by Prism99; 10-04-2012 at 02:11 PM.

  8. #8
    Super Member woody's Avatar
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    Try here
    http://quilting.about.com/od/quiltse...ngtriangls.htm
    They are called setting triangles and there are many different tutorials on calculating the right size.
    The biggest risk is the one not taken

  9. #9
    Junior Member QuiltedCritterLady's Avatar
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    Wow! Thank you all so much! The links are great and I have them bookmarked. I love the Amish answer to this block, so I'm not going to make a new one. But, I really wanted to know how to make it with corners for the next time. I have something new to practice.
    Never underestimate the power of a woman with a sewing machine!

  10. #10
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
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    OK, so I am lazy. I over cut. I multiply the unfinished block by 1.8 and divide by 2, then square up. I cut on the diagonal, sew on the blocks then trim the whole block. If I have enough fabric, I will also cut the blocks for the setting triangles the size of the finished block, cut on the diagonal and sew. When I trim what is important is that I leave 1/4" between the point created (in your case) by the white fabric and the trimmed edge. That 1/4" is your seam allowance so the point of the white is exactly at the seam.
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  11. #11
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    I agree... I like it the way it is, but I also cut HUGE then cut to size after I am done. I am NOT good at math by any stretch of the imagination

  12. #12
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    Where are you in Peoria? I'm in Glendale by the football stadium. PM me if you would like. I have a couple of small groups that you are welcome to join. Its fun to have company and we help each other with our dilemmas!
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  13. #13
    Super Member kathdavis's Avatar
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    I love your cardinal. That is a very pretty block.
    Kathleen

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  14. #14
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    You could use the Square in a Square method if you don't think you could do it well with using oversized triangles and then cutting it down. The SiS, by Jodi Barrows, method really works well. I don't use it much because I think it wastes material. But, it is the easiest method for insuring a good 'fit.'

    Here is a video of one way to make SiS: http://www.hgtv.com/video/super-fast-rotary-cutting-video/index.html I love this technique for scrappy quilts.

    This site has a chart for the different sizes: http://quiltville.com/sqinsqtutorial.shtml

    Another site: http://www.frugalquilting.com/square_in_a_square_quilting_block.htm Use method #2 for your block it is much neater.

    Also: http://sleepyowlstudio.wordpress.com/2011/04/03/square-in-a-square-quilt-block-tutorial/ but this needs that specified size for the center square. Likewise: http://www.askpennyhalgren.com/IKM/questions/135/How+do+you+make+the+Square+in+a+Square+Quilt+Block %3F

    You might understand the math involved by looking at how this one does the different SiS sizes: http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art172248.asp


    Yes, I know, I had too much time on my hands. Oh well.

    Enjoy,
    ali
    Last edited by AliKat; 10-04-2012 at 10:34 PM.
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  15. #15
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    Make the diagonal square larger relax about the maths. You will find that pressing adding the applique etc all alter the middle diagonals. Even putting on the outside triangle corners you may stretch as you sew.
    Cutting. Bis square down , donot forget to leave a 1/4 inch seam allowance above the points. When sew next outer edge on it may be easier as a newbie to sew with the pieced section on top. You can see where the seams cross just make sure you go just above ( forget seam allowance fo a few stitches past) .should be sharp point if you can follow my instructions.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Anastasia's Avatar
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    From a math burnout perspective, it's a right triangle, therefore a^2+b^2=c^2. So top and side lengths of your center square, squared, added together, will be squared length of your diagonal. take the square root of that and that's your length, add 7/8, or do what I (and most everyone else I know) do and round up to the next whole number, sew on, trim up. viola. Do this on a calculator. It's not worth it to go OMG MATH EWWW.. heheh. That would actually give you the proper TRIANGLE size but most people I know use a square then cut off the corners, which is a wasteful method, agreed, BUT.. you can make a presto chango viola HST from that corner you cut off if you just sew another seam while you're at it, 1/2" away from the first. My brain just flitted away but I think if you do the square method just find the midpoint length and add an inch then trim down.
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  17. #17
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
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    I think the wing is cut backwards. The feather humps should go towards the bird. Didn't know if you noticed

  18. #18
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    Your block is beautiful. I did not notice the points until you mentioned them.

    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltedCritterLady View Post
    I am working on this block to be the center square for a memory quilt for a friend who was recently diagnosed with inoperable cancer. I am still fairly new (obviously) to quilting and don't know what I did wrong on the background. I wanted an 8" block (8 1/2") finished size. What should I have done differently? I think I ran across a formula for this type of block at one point, but I can't seem to find it. Can one of you please share that with me?
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  19. #19
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    Another thought would be to do a paper mock up....easier on the mind....and then work backwards....and yes I like the idea of over cutting....my goodness that extra 1/2-3/4" can been a huge life saver, and give you good looking blocks.
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  20. #20
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    I have the same problem also. Making a quilt with triangle and losing my points or the overlap.

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