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Thread: Batik pros and cons

  1. #51
    Senior Member sewgray's Avatar
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    Batiks are by far my favorite. No problems here, of course I don't hand quilt.
    klgreene, those quilts are beautiful. You could send that second one to me if no one else wants it. Ha!

  2. #52
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    Thanks Lori S! I will follow your instructions and wash, wash, treat the material before I start my next project. The material I have washed/treated in the past has been nicer to work with than not. Our quilt guild just finished a king sized quilt for the Georgia Quilt Museum and it was constructed mostly with donated batiks. Since we are from Cherokee County it incorporated the Trail of Tears and Cherokee Rose pattern plus an appliqued picture of a historical building in our county. It will be sent around the state for many months and finally be hung with other guilds' quilts at the Georgia State Capitol then later in the museum. This was a good experience for our 60 member guild. JC

  3. #53
    Super Member catmcclure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckcowl
    i love working with Batik's the only issue i've ever had was using fusable on them, i don't know if it was due to the wax or what but i really had trouble trying to use one fusable; it did not adhere and made everything very 'shiny' i may have had the iron too hot for the fabric and fusable combo, i really don't know but i dont' bother trying fusables any more i save the batiks for other projects, but they are wonderful to work with!
    If you use washable Elmer's school glue, you can glue your appliques down and then stitch them. The glue holds them until the first wash, when it dissolves and goes down the drain. I love washable glue. I use it a lot.

  4. #54
    Super Member MISHNJIM's Avatar
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    Did some say "BATIKS"???? LOL I LOVE BATIKS!!!!! My favorite kind of fabric. I've also never had a problem with bleeding and I always aways pre-wash "ALL" of my fabrics before cutting. I use have also learned earlier this year to put a sheet of "Color Catcher made by Shout" in the washing machine. It helps prevent the bleeding of the colors.

    BATIKS :thumbup: :thumbup: BATIKS

  5. #55
    Super Member mamaw's Avatar
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    I am glad I started this topic, and very grateful for all the information shared by everyone. I am definitely looking forward to doing a quilt with batiks now; but not before purchasing some Retayne....I already have the Shout color catcher sheets. Will also make sure to use a sharp needle on my machine. Thanks everyone!
    Nancy

  6. #56
    Power Poster ann clare's Avatar
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    I love working with batiks and have handquilted with no problems.

  7. #57
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    I love batiks for piecing, but do not like them for applique,because the fabric is so finely woven, the applique stitches will not readily bury themselves.

  8. #58

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    I only use batiks for hand applique and quilting and I don't have a problem.

    I've never washed them first and they don't run when I washed the finished quilt. True batiks are made by putting the design on plain muslin fabric with stamps and hot wax. Then they are dyed. To get the wax off, they are boiled. No need to wash first or twice. If your fabric is bleeding and you have to wash it twice, it isn't a real bali batik.

  9. #59
    kajaza's Avatar
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    I love Batiks! No cons here!

  10. #60

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    Thanks for the info. I just started quilting in Feb. 2010 and just bought some batik fabric. What is Retayne and where can I get it?
    [email protected] :-)

  11. #61
    Super Member teacherbailey's Avatar
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    Here's my two cents worth....but I guess with the price of batiks it should be a lot more????

    I don't ever prewash anything. Call me lazy but I've never learned the hard way, so I don't bother to prewash.

    Nobody told me to use a different needle so I don't. My usual all-purpose needle works fine. In fact, I just finished a batik quilt top with a needle that I've used weekly, if not daily, for well over a year and it was just fine. (I am self-taught and never think to change a needle unless it breaks!)

    I don't put batiks on the back (usually hand-dye a matching tie-dye or something else interesting with multiple colors) so I don't have to machine quilt through multiple layers of batiks and it works out fine. I don't applique or hand quilt them so I can't comment on those....

    In short, I just treat them like any other high-quality fabric from my LQS and I've never had a problem. I know that others have given different opinions so you'll just have to experiment! :)

  12. #62
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    They are great you'll either love them or hate them. I only know one gal who hates them she doesn't like the feel of them.

  13. #63

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    Love them. I found that you need to prewash twice to soften and to prevent bleed.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathy
    I've never had a running batik either. They go thru som many harsh processes I just don't see how they can run, maybe it's the brand.
    I have to disagree (Nicely) but I have had many of my batiks bleed. I always wash in the sink and then the washing machine with a special treatment (forgot the name) I also use the clorox color catchers.
    But I LOVE my batiks!!!
    I will have to say I use them for almost all of my hand appliqes and don't have a problem with the stiching.

  15. #65
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    Thank you - all of you - for sharing your experiences with working with batiks. I always learn so much from you and appreciate your willingness to help and share. :)

  16. #66
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    Batiks are magical. They have mystery and depth to them. Find a quilt pattern that has large enough areas to show off the batiks. I've mixed batiks with other fabrics. Love those batiks. Always prewash. Great to iron.

  17. #67
    Super Member Sheree from Chicago's Avatar
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    Batiks are my favorite! Wonderful to work with.

  18. #68

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    They are wonderful for applique. However check for bleeding with all the over dyed ones as so many of them are going to bleed. I usually take each one I am interesting in doing a project with and put a white or clear bowl in the sink while I check for bleeding. If it is then I get out a plastic glove and my bottle of ReTayne which is a product available at most quilt shops. It stops the bleeding. I usually add maybe a teaspoon full in the bowl with clear water for less then a yard and let it sit in the bowl a minute or so and then rinse it and make sure its set by checking it again in clear water. Its simple and prevents the color from ruining your project. I had one piece of fabric that was kind of a rust and it turned the water hot pink. That was a shock. They remain one of my favorite fabrics.

  19. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S
    I love to work on Batiks but... Just a few notes:
    1. Do pretreat/wash fabrics with Retayne, batiks RUN/Bleed. it so worth the time to get to the problem prior to constuction. Prewashing will reduce some of the running/bleeding but unless pretreated they will continue to keep running ( smaller amounts at each washing) .
    2. It can be tough to buy Batiks over the internet . Not all the colors will show in the small swatch, or the evenness of the color placement. Batiks like the Hoffman watercolor collection are really one color tone/tone so it is not so much of an issue with that collection.
    I once purchased a batik on line , the swatch showed very good colors that I wanted but when arrived there was another color ( purple) that in the yardage.
    3. Do not use Heat and Bond light or heavy , it leaves a residue stain.
    4. Because they are so thightly woven , removing stitches can leave a permanent needle hole.
    5. hand applique is painful .... really its hard to get the needle through.
    6. If you run out of a specific batik it is next to impossible to get more . There is no identifier in the selvage , the fabric is completley dyed. So tracking one down ... is really hard. If purchasing from the internet do keep a note as to the manufacture and site used. There are a few batik lines ( Hoffman has one that is tonal , and produced for years , but there are lots and lots of shades in the collection and tough to see on a computer exactly which blue you have) .
    7. Repeat number 1 .... can not stress the pretreat enough.

    All that said .. I LOVE batiks and can not get enough of them. They can create some of the most dramatic quilts.
    I totally agree with every word.

  20. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deb watkins
    I agree that the look of them is stunning, however I also think that since they do run and bleed alot, it can be a pain to work with them. I had a quilt that was washed before cutting and quilting, and it still ran and pretty much ruined the look of the quilt.
    Deb if you look for ReTayne at the quilt shops you can stop all that bleeding. Most of the batiks are over dyed. However I have found even some cottons bleed, especially the dark reds. Retayne runs in the neighborhood of $10. and goes along ways. I alway check with clear water a corner of the fabric and for less then a yard I put on plastic gloves as it would be absorbed by your skin, I use about a teaspoon and swish it around to make sure its wet all over and after a minute or so I rinse it out and test one more time with clear water. If it is then your good to go.

  21. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by pieces
    Maybe its just a personal thing. (?) I make scrappy quilts mostly, and when I tried to incorporate some batik scraps they just didn't seem to blend in.
    The one thing I noticed about batiks is that they will take over but, I just love them for leaves and flowers in a project.

  22. #72

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    i love all the advice i am starting a quilt for my granddaughter and it is all batiks and will be appliqued elephants...yes..batik elephants!!

  23. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by gramsielu
    Thanks for the info. I just started quilting in Feb. 2010 and just bought some batik fabric. What is Retayne and where can I get it?
    [email protected] :-)
    Its a clear chemical put out by G & K Craft Industries Ltd. Its a colro fixative for Commercialy dyed cotton fabrics. It recommends 1 teaspoon per yd. and if your doing a quilt use hot water 140 degrees and add dry cotton and set for a 20 minute wash. Rinse with cool water and dry right away. Personally I check all fabrics as I wash them. I also cut the corners to tell me that I did just that. You can purchase this product in good quilt shops. I don't recall seeing it in JoAnns. Its in the area of $10. for 4 ounces and its goes a long ways.

  24. #74
    community benefactor
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    This has been a great conversation. I love the colors of batiks. Since I very new at this I was having question that were coming up in my mind. I didn't know if the material was treated different than other cottens. Prewash, mixing and all the thing that you great people have answered here for me.
    Thanks I have just bought some batik material off the internet, but haven't started anything I now know what things I should do to start and what to expect when sewing.

  25. #75
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    I even love to applique with batiks. I am doing one now and all I have left to do are the borders. The center is finished and it has a WOW factor that is off the charts. I will post pics when it is all done. (Only have 14 flowers, stems and leaves with small dots to finish up) Probably another 40 or 50 hours is all. lol

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