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Thread: Best thread for basting a quilt sandwich?

  1. #1
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    Best thread for basting a quilt sandwich?

    I love the results when I hand baste the quilt sandwich the way Sharon Schamber describes. It is also relaxing to me. I have not found the DMC thread some recommend. What is best basting thread to use for this and where can I order it?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Terri D.'s Avatar
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    You should be able to use any 50-weight cotton thread for basting a quilt sandwich. 60-weight or finer may be too weak a thread for the job. The best tip I've heard for thread basting is to use a light colored thread. When you remove a dark colored basting thread from your sandwich, it can leave little dark fuzzies which you have to brush off your quilt top. Otherwise, you should be good to go.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    When I use to thread baste I used serger thread. A cone lasted for many quilts, and not hard to remove. It is easy to find serger thread at yardsales in my area. I think so many bought it because it was cheap and there was a lot on the cone. I won't save used basting thread so the cheaper was best for me.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
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  4. #4
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    I just love the Sharon Schambers basting method, too! I found numerous vendors on eBay selling the DMC tatting thread, prices and shipping very reasonable. The label says DMC 80. The thread is thicker and rougher than sewing thread, so is supposed to hug better and not slip through the layers like smoother thread.

  5. #5
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    our weekly senior bee also uses cone serger thread for basting. it is white, so easy to see on the quilts we make.
    Nancy in western NY
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  6. #6
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    Add me to using the cheapest crap I can lay my hands on for thread basting. So white serger thread usually fills the bill. I also use it for basting applique pieces. Basically any temporary job where I am going to cut it and toss it.

  7. #7
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    I use Sharon's method also. I love her method. That quilt does not move or shift at all. Before when I basted with regular 50wt sewing thread, the quilt still shifted. We have a little stitchery shop that has tatting supplies, but I use crochet thread or pearle cotton. Either of those work great. The crochet thread is the cheapest. I can get a ball for about 25cents at our thrift store.

    I also like her method because I can sit....no bending over a table, killing my back. It's a challenge doing a big quilt though, but it's doable.

    ETA: I use size 8 perle cotton and size 5 or 10 crochet thread
    Last edited by Barb44; 06-06-2014 at 09:08 AM. Reason: add info

  8. #8
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    Rough thread

    I can tell the difference when I use a rough thread ( not mercerized). It doesn't slide around in the quilt sandwich and will hold the quilt more firmly.

  9. #9
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    Rough thread

    I can tell the difference when I use a rough thread ( not mercerized). It doesn't slide around in the quilt sandwich and will hold the quilt more firmly.

  10. #10
    Senior Member AlvaStitcher's Avatar
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    I use up my various and sundry spools of thread that won't work well in my sewing machine. Not particular about color since it is removed easily anyway. Amazing how many spools just have a little bit of thread left on them and can be used up in its entirety. I have emptied several spools on just one quilt. Kinda like recycling. Works for me!

  11. #11
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I use Sharon's method as well and there is only one thread I will use.

    Water soluble.

    I can quilt right over it and when I'm done quilting it washes out.

    And yes it holds the quilt together. Even a heavy flannel quilt.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  12. #12
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I used the smallest size of pearl cotton I could get at JoAnn's. I have also used size 20 crochet thread. Both are grippy enough to work with her method. I also bought large doll making needles at JoAnn's and they work really well with the bigger size of thread.

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