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Thread: blocks not same size

  1. #26

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    this is why I bought a aqquilt cutting machine it cut it for you

  2. #27
    Junior Member ga447's Avatar
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    Does it cut 10 1/2 squares or just 10 in squares? Your suggestion is something I might have to purchase. Any tips?

  3. #28
    Super Member Dodie's Avatar
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    I am in a sewing group that exchanges blocks and all rulers do not measure the same and also different people just sew different so we settled the problem by sewing a border around our blocke then timming all to a set size works great so even a beginner does not have to worry about joining our group and gives them a chance to learn

  4. #29
    Junior Member ga447's Avatar
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    I love your idea but the best part is you are taking consideration for the new beginner.

  5. #30
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    I have found using the 1/4 inch ruler and marking the seams helps to keep everything the same size. This helps when you work awhile, then put it away for a few days to longer and get it out again. A soft pencil works great for marking the seam line. Don't push the iron, let is sit on the fabric, raise it and go to the next space. If you have bias seams, they like to move or stretch so you have to be careful.
    Measure and cut each square after you have pressed it to the same size. You may have cut some pieces a bit shy or others a bit too big and if all the seams are sewed exactly, you should not have that problem. So simple to draw the seams and sew on them, even for experts, they don't have a magic touch, just take the time and we have all been there, done that.

    Carol J.

  6. #31
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    Thanks ladies for your help it is good info for me. I ironed instead of pressing. so there is alot of good feed back you ladies gaVE ME i CAN TRY. mANY THANKS TO ALL OF YOU FOR YOUR HELP.

  7. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by ga447
    I am new to quilting also, I just realized that the charm squares I was cutting will not equal to 10 1/2 in squares, da so I will probably have to add a sash or just chain all the square together. Luckily I am not following a pattern, I just learned to do the "Ohio Star"and I had to frog at least six of the squares till I got it right. Don't give up we are newbies but I know in the future we will get this.
    What does "frog" mean and how do you frog a square?

  8. #33
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    thanks i will try this. again thanks to all who have given me such good input.

  9. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by ga447
    I am new to quilting also, I just realized that the charm squares I was cutting will not equal to 10 1/2 in squares, da so I will probably have to add a sash or just chain all the square together. Luckily I am not following a pattern, I just learned to do the "Ohio Star"and I had to frog at least six of the squares till I got it right. Don't give up we are newbies but I know in the future we will get this.
    What does "frog" mean and how do you "frog" a square?

  10. #35
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    I agree!
    Quote Originally Posted by Rettie V.Grama
    Since you already have the blocks made and discovered some smaller than others, this is what I would recommend. What ever you do, don't cut the larger ones to fit the smaller ones. Depending on how much smaller the small ones are, you could: Make a tiny border around it to bring up to size, or you could stagger the blocks and just put the border on just two sides of the smaller block.l Remember this: There is no one in this world that is perfect, especially a new quilter. I have quilted for years and still come up with errors. Someone a long time ago said, "There is always a mistake in every quilt." I've found that to be true, but usually the viewer can't find it. So, don't dispare, there are many of us with you. Keep on stitchin' it will get better.

    Quote Originally Posted by barbrose
    hi everyone new to quilting still learning i am making a quilt; but when i go to put my blocks together they end up being smaller or some larger than others i pressed i starched but i need help what am i doing wrong? please help

  11. #36
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    Thanks Carol. That will help good info

  12. #37
    Senior Member Jamiestitcher62's Avatar
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    For me it's not the 1/4" seam in itself, it's when you start stacking pieces with points and everything, then the 1/4" seam starts to get wonky.

    I think I have a problem with my cutting too. You know, do you line up the fabric to the line on the ruler, over the line on the ruler, etc. Sometimes I'm not consistent.

    I am re-working a BOM set of blocks that I previously did and these pieces are coming out much larger than the ones I did before. I must be doing something better this time, because the older ones were much smaller than the 12 1/2" they were supposed to be. These are around 12 1/2", but still a little wonky depending on how much piecing is in that particular piece.

    Squaring up is one of those things that I haven't grasped quite yet. I have the little squaring up rulers, but to square up a 12 1/2" block is for some reason giving me trouble.

    I find myself cutting off tips of things or not allowing for the 1/4" so I don't lose a point, it just seems like all so much to keep in mind while cutting those edges. I'm apparently not aware of yet all the things to take into consideration when squaring up a block.

    Stupid question though, after reading some of the responses, if you were doing a multi-stage block, would you measure each step to be sure it added up and if it didn't would you cut it down before moving onto the next step. Is that something that should be done or not?

  13. #38
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    Not a fun solution but usually works is to rip some of the seams to make the smallest blocks a bit larger after resewing them. I have done this many times. To make accurate seams next time..be to measure seams often. It helps to put a piece of tape along on the needleplate at 1/4 inch from the needle. White tape is easy to see. Sew a seam and then measure it to make sure it is the correct width. If not ..Rip and do it over.

  14. #39
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    Accurate cutting is a must. Also if your seam allowance is varying, try to get a seam guide or a 1/4" foot that has a fabric stop on it.

  15. #40
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    IF you cut all the pieces the same size, and IF you sewed all the pieces together with the same seam allowance -

    then the blocks should have ended up approximately the same size.

    Not necessarily the expected size, but approximately the same size. :|

    I am not a fan of trying to "stretch" a block when it is skimpy.

    (I've read that even "experts" do it - I still won't do it)

    What happens to it the next time it is washed and dried? I would think it would revert back to whatever was "natural" for it.

    Like snug jeans - after wearing them for awhile, they stretch out - but they revert "back" after washing them again.

  16. #41
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Connie Merritt
    Quote Originally Posted by ga447
    I am new to quilting also, I just realized that the charm squares I was cutting will not equal to 10 1/2 in squares, da so I will probably have to add a sash or just chain all the square together. Luckily I am not following a pattern, I just learned to do the "Ohio Star"and I had to frog at least six of the squares till I got it right. Don't give up we are newbies but I know in the future we will get this.
    What does "frog" mean and how do you "frog" a square?
    Frog goes rip, rip, rip. That's what it's all about...ripping seams. :D

  17. #42
    Junior Member krisgray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingaz
    If possible you can square up the blocks. Find the smallest one and square all others to that size. Of course this will not work if you are cutting off points.

    As said above, accurate cutting, seaming, and pressing are the only real solution. Watch that 1/4 inch seam, that is usually the culprit.
    Second this. I've also had 1 or 2 that for some reason stayed small, after reconstructing a couple times. So, I put some background strips on 2 sides of the small blocks and then squared them up the same size as the others. Ain't perfect but who's gonna know?!

  18. #43
    mmlctnp's Avatar
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    Would framing each block with a small border help disguise the fact that they are just a little off?

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deb watkins
    Accurate cutting is a must, as well as accurate seams. Press not iron as this can stretch your block even a little which will make a huge difference.
    Ditto !! and a dry iron is much friendlier to fabrics than steam.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by barbrose
    hi everyone new to quilting still learning i am making a quilt; but when i go to put my blocks together they end up being smaller or some larger than others i pressed i starched but i need help what am i doing wrong? please help
    Sharyan Craid has a couple of wonderful books out on using swap blocks, etc. save this quilt by doing the outside strips in some manner. your eye really does not see the little difference. cutting down so often ruins points, etc. then--practice all the great tips you are being given here. keep it up, you will love it ! most of us probably did not save some of our early, wonky blocks, but it would be interesting to have a show of "buggers".

  21. #46
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Accurate cutting and sewing is the only answer. Don't throw your blocks away - sew a frame of material around them to make them all the same size and then put the blocks together.

  22. #47
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    If you are starching as you are putting the block together, it can thro your blocks off. That is from personal experience. I was even very careful not to "rio" only "press" but I skewed them up royally.

  23. #48
    Senior Member connie_1936's Avatar
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    did you change presser feet in the middle of piecing your blocks? this really messed me up a while back. there was a slight difference and my seams were about 3 threads narrower. overall this changed the size of some of the blocks.

  24. #49
    Senior Member sew wishful's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMY in QCA-IL
    Practice sewing "scant" 1/4" seams until you can get a consistent measurement. Find a spot on your sewing machine or mark with tape where you can end up with a "scant" 1/4" seam. ("Scant" means a thread ot two just short of a measured 1/4".)
    I've gotten pretty good at 1/4" seams, but I gotta say...I make my quilts to be used by my grandkids...I worry about 1/4" seams...I think I want to use 1/2" seams to keep them from fraying while washing, or wrestling around with them in bed..so if I do that I need to increase the size of each block by what? half inch? inch?

  25. #50
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    If they're really wonky, just sew them so that the seams are meant to not meet. Make the first row straight, then the next row a half a block over. That way they look like you meant it that way, and go with it!
    Practise makes almost perfect. Be fussy with your cutting and your 1/4" seam. Then things will come together better. Oh, and always use the same ruler!

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