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Thread: blocks not same size

  1. #51
    Super Member luckylindy333's Avatar
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    Also, sometimes if you end up with triangles on the outside edge of a block, it can stretch, that is why careful dry pressing is a must.

    I think the best advice is to have fun- remember no one is going to notice if the quilt is off a little if they are passing by on a galloping horse!

    :D :D :D

  2. #52
    Junior Member Donna in Mo's Avatar
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    Be sure and use a dry iron. If you steam press, they will shrink. I know this from experience. My motto is I think I can, I think I can, I think I can, and just keep trying. You will get it.

  3. #53
    Member ljwinemiller's Avatar
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    Have you tried to put a frame around your blocks and then square them all up to the same size? I would use a soild color and use the largest block as a guide and put a frame around each block that can be the same size as the largest block. I plan to do this to a paper-pieced quilt that I am working on where the blocks are different sizes.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donna in Mo
    Be sure and use a dry iron. If you steam press, they will shrink. I know this from experience. My motto is I think I can, I think I can, I think I can, and just keep trying. You will get it.
    Are these washed or unwashed fabrics?


    I soak my fabrics in hot water - wash in cool to warm - dry on permanent press.

    I have no noticeable shrinking when I press my blocks - either dry or with steam.

  5. #55
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
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    Hope I can explain clearly what I do by adding the sashing strips to square the block. If your block is to be 12 1/2" square, lay the block in the left hand corner of your cutting mat. If the block is too small lay it in the corner with equal distance all around to come up with the 12 1/2" square. Lay the sashing strips to the two opposing sides . making sure they are 12 1/2", pin and sew. Do the same to the other opposing sides. If you can't get enough of a seam allowance sew what you can and make it up on the next block that has had the sashing added. If the block is too big move the sashing strips in a bit and try easing in some of the excess of the block. I'm a very visual person, so if this doesn't make sense let me know and I'll walk you through the process.

  6. #56
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    Hello 4 cities, IL. I recently bought a Kenmore machine. It has a quarter inch, a scant quarter inch and a three-quarter inch setting. Love it, as I make items that need a smaller seam.

    Quote Originally Posted by PMY in QCA-IL
    Practice sewing "scant" 1/4" seams until you can get a consistent measurement. Find a spot on your sewing machine or mark with tape where you can end up with a "scant" 1/4" seam. ("Scant" means a thread ot two just short of a measured 1/4".)

  7. #57
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    Yes, Jennie Girl there is such a thing as a scant 1/4 inch. I've used in for years by appoximating with my eye, now, I don't need to figure it out anymore.

    I recently purchased a Kenmore Machine that has many settings. One is the width of seams. There is a scant 1/4 inch, a 1/4 inch and a 3/4 inch seam width. I just turn a button and have the stitch I want.

  8. #58
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    I have a suggestion. Just be accurate first in purchasing material. # 1. Don't use stretchy fabric unless you use it all over the quilt.# 2. When cutting your pattern, make sure your cuts are accurate. (try the block first as the templates request, some templates are slightly off). If they are off, even an enth of an inch, it throws the whole block off. # 3. Make sure all your seams are accuratly measured. Any diviation of this width will cause a problem.
    # 4. Slow down! It took God 6 days to creat the world and on the fifth day, He rested.

  9. #59

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    I too am fairly new to quilting and I find measuring one of the hardest parts.

  10. #60
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    You have received lots of good advice. Now for another little bit....Perfection is highly over rated! Just enjoy your efforts and things will get better as you go.

  11. #61
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    I noticed you said you had the small "square" rulers. Do you own a 12 1/2 inch square one? I use that one a lot and it is well worth the investment to square your block accurately.

  12. #62
    Member ljwinemiller's Avatar
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    That's the size I use the most!

  13. #63
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    Cutting the material properly is crutial as well as correct 1/4 inch seams. Also place the iron on the fabric and try not to run the iron over the fabric as this could stretch the material.

  14. #64
    Super Member pittsburgpam's Avatar
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    It really does just take time. When I first started quilting I had lots of problems with things lining up. After 20 years I'm better at it. :)

    Absolutely critical to cut accurate and even more important to sew a CONSISTENT seam allowance. If you don't have a machine that can move the needle to the 1/4" setting then get a 1/4" foot. The best thing I ever did to help with accuracy was getting my Viking 830 that has the needle setting. The 1.8 setting is 1/4" and I move it one tick more to 2.0. I just did a quilt with 48 blocks that have 1 1/2" pieces and I didn't need to square up anything, they all came out great.

  15. #65
    Senior Member CindyBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanne girl
    I don't believe there is such a thing as "a scant 1/4" seam". It either is or it isn't and you need to find out where an exact 1/4" seam is on your sewing machine plate. I use 70 microytex sharpie needles and 60wt 100%cotton thread..it is just as strong and less lint than 50 wt. These 2 items take less space for the seam, thus more perfect piecing. Press each seam line as you go and then press each seam in the direction it should go in the whole piecing. Measure ea.block as you complete it and if it isn't the size it should be, get it right before you continue any further with another block.
    My thoughts exactly. This is what I do. No taping stuff to your machine and agonizing over every seam.

  16. #66
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    thanks for input i found out what i did wrong switched to a differant ruler in measureing blocks to cut. :thumbup: :oops:

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