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Thread: combining lengthwise and crosswise grain

  1. #1
    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    combining lengthwise and crosswise grain

    I do a lot of scrap quilting and paper piecing so I am sure I don't normally worry about this But:
    I am planning on a Radiant Suns quilt by Doodle Press and the pattern pieces have arrows on them to match to the grain.

    If I go scrappy, I'm wondering if it's going to cause me a problem to mix lengthwise and crosswise cut pieces? I should probably avoid things on the bias if possible or does that even matter since the pieces are parts of a swirl?
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 12-28-2017 at 11:22 AM. Reason: remove shouting/all caps
    Christy
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    Super Member QuiltingNinaSue's Avatar
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    I do not know the answer, but someone will, I am sure. In the Stack and Whack patterns, it is not something I really pay attention too, just following directions from Bethany Reynolds books on the subject. When its cut on the bias, the bias can stretch or be pressed so its out of alignment with a block. That I have experienced. If the pattern shows the grain lines two different ways, it probably is important to pay attention to it in that pattern and mark it on the piece cut out.

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    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltingNinaSue View Post
    If the pattern shows the grain lines two different ways, it probably is important to pay attention to it in that pattern and mark it on the piece cut out.
    No the pattern has arrows always showing where you line up with the straight of grain, but I've seen this pattern done scrappy so I have to wonder if you are working from scraps, you often don't even have a selvedge edge.
    Christy
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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Is this the pattern? http://www.kayewood.com/Radiant-Suns...s-DPD-RASU.htm

    For a scrappy quilt, what I would do is *heavily* starch all the fabrics before cutting. I consider a heavy starch to be a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid starch and water. Heavy starching will help prevent stretching and distortion of the fabric while you work.

    I would not completely ignore the arrows on the templates, but would rather try to match the arrows with the grain of the fabric piece. You can tell the grain of the fabric by looking at it closely (a magnifying glass helps). You don't need to be exactly on grain, but the closer to on-grain you can get the easier the piecing will be. In other words, I wouldn't worry about mixing lengthwise and crosswise grains; I would just want to align the arrows with one grain or the other.

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    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Is this the pattern? http://www.kayewood.com/Radiant-Suns...s-DPD-RASU.htm

    For a scrappy quilt, what I would do is *heavily* starch all the fabrics before cutting. I consider a heavy starch to be a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid starch and water. Heavy starching will help prevent stretching and distortion of the fabric while you work.

    I would not completely ignore the arrows on the templates, but would rather try to match the arrows with the grain of the fabric piece. You can tell the grain of the fabric by looking at it closely (a magnifying glass helps). You don't need to be exactly on grain, but the closer to on-grain you can get the easier the piecing will be. In other words, I wouldn't worry about mixing lengthwise and crosswise grains; I would just want to align the arrows with one grain or the other.
    Yes. That is the pattern. I am thinking the same as you. It would be better to align the arrows with either straight or crosswise but avoid placing it on the bias. Sewing the curved edges would be more difficult if they stretch. I've never used starch before but this might be a good time to start!
    Christy
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    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I'll bet the arrows indicate to show that pieces on the edge of the block are on the straight of grain. That would be all that I would worry about at any rate.

    With scraps you can determine straight of grain, and even WOF and LOF.

    To determine straight of grain, eyeballing it is really good enough to insure the straight part of the edge of the block will be on straight of grain.

    To determine which way is WOF and LOF ... give the piece of fabric a little tug on the straight of grain in both directions (ie horizontal and vertical). The one that stretches a tiny bit is the WOF, the one that doesn't have any give to it is the LOF.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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    Lengthwise/crosswise probably won't be a problem (meaning as long as it goes with the grain, which one it is does not matter). As to lining up at all, it depends on if they are lined up to give you plenty of stretch around the curve (needed) , or to give you the most stability along the finished straight edge (only needed if this is a problem area for you).

    I also would not starch a curved edge before sewing, as you need it to stretch unless you plan on stay-stitching and clipping the seam allowance before you sew the curve. I find with only 1/4" allowance, I don't have to clip unless I'm doing a very tight curve. There is enough ease in the fabric as it is. However if a lot of the curve line ends up following a straight of grain, you'll have more problems getting it to set correctly.

    I have the quick curve rulers, and they use the same cutting line for the pieces, so when you sew them, you actually are lining up a seam line that has slightly different radius curves. In that case, you really do need the stretch. If this pattern uses a method where you are cutting a block with a curve and swapping the inside/outside curves and sewing them together, you'll need the stretch and the lines will be more important as they as set to give you that ease needed for the curves. If you are getting templates for each piece so eh seam line matches up, it's less of a problem.
    My name is Cathy - and I'm addicted to old sewing machines and their attachments.

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    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Cathy, that makes sense the way you explained it. I think I'll do without the starch. I am still choosing fabrics but will try and make a couple squares first to see how it comes together. I would've already done that today but I pulled a muscle in my back and am taking it easy for a day or two.
    Christy
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    making a sample/ test block is usually worth the time and effort .

    sometimes the pattern pieces and directions are inaccurate.

    sometimes it is me that is "off".

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    I am sorry for your sore back. Hope you are using ice (if you can) and heat to help you over the hurdle of pain.

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    Super Member Mrs. SewNSew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carolynjo View Post
    I am sorry for your sore back. Hope you are using ice (if you can) and heat to help you over the hurdle of pain.
    Thank you. It's just one of those things where you have such a bad cough when you are sick that you actually pull muscles in your back. It hurts a lot but no serious damage.
    Christy
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