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Thread: Cotton quilting thread?

  1. #1
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    Cotton quilting thread?

    Why do so many of you like it? My most recent quilt seems to have several broken threads in the free motion quilting. I used something definitely meant for this. I have used polyester thread to quilt before and not had this much of a problem.

  2. #2
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    It is easier to hand quilt with, doesn't knot as much. I always use polyester thread to machine quilt, it doesn't break as much.

  3. #3
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    I just like the idea of cotton better, and the idea of the fabric and thread both being cotton. I haven't had trouble using cotton for quilting.
    Lisa

  4. #4
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    I use what looks good when machine quilting and it isn't always all cotton thread.

  5. #5
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    Cotton is no problem for me. It's the very thin synthetic embroidery thread that breaks on me. It is so fine that it doesn't always stay where it should in the thread guides. Too bad, because I like the colors and the shine. My next quilt will be quilted with Superior Threads Masterpiece cotton.

  6. #6
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I think it is trial and error with needle/thread combos that your machine likes. I started out with my new to me Brother 1500 Nouvelle and had a lot of problems. I thought it was the machine. then I kept trying different thread and needle sizes, combos, and realized my machine doesn't like to go in a certain direction so I have to remember to go very slowly. Now I can use a lot of different threads with good results. But right now I am fighting a polyester thread that is not Isacord and the first half of the quilt went fine, now it is breaking every few minutes. I'm thinking there is something wrong with the thread but, I started in the middle with an all over design and want it to match. I've cleaned, oiled, changed needle, etc. It isn't a tension issue. The thread shreds at the needle. For no apparent reason. No burrs, good needle, inserted correctly, threaded correctly, etc. So a mystery. I am plodding through.
    Alyce

  7. #7
    Super Member Irishrose2's Avatar
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    Stitchnripper, Is the thread coming off the spool the correct way for your machine? I often have to set those kind of spools in a cup behind the machine.

  8. #8
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irishrose2 View Post
    Stitchnripper, Is the thread coming off the spool the correct way for your machine? I often have to set those kind of spools in a cup behind the machine.
    Yes I have it on a thread stand and it goes from there to the thread stand on the machine. It was fine for a good portion of the quilt. I put some sewers aid on the thread. I have been Reading about mineral oil on thread but I think that is only in cotton. I have a mechanical machine so not too worried about computer issues. Still pondering
    Alyce

  9. #9
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I use connecting threads cotton thread or coats and clark thread. Sometimes I have problems most times I don't. If thread breaks I switch to a size 16 needle and no more problems.
    Another Phyllis
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  10. #10
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    I use a jean needle for machine quilting with thread 50 wt or thicker thread. No matter what the thread size says to match needle to it. The jeans needle always work for me when the others give me problems of shredded thread to breaking thread. Seldom have problems with any type of cotton or poly thread. I have heard thread popping in a finished quilt when my grands were tugging it. I think some quilts will be tugged or snagged if used so no use fretting over it. I've never had one fall apart yet.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member lyric girl's Avatar
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    I piece with Aurifil 50. I quilt on my long arm with Glide 40 which is a polyester thread.

  12. #12
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    I piece and quilt with Aurifil 50, but I use different sizes of needles for each - larger for quilting. I do sometimes use polyester thread for quilting if I want a particular color or a thicker thread (e.g., Mettler or Connecting Threads cotton) if I want a particular look.

  13. #13
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    I piece with 50 weight, generally Aurifil. My favorite machine quilting thread is Coats & Clark machine quilting thread 30 weight which is a cotton thread. I've never had breakage with it and it is economical. Another plus is that one of the places it is sold is Walmart which is a few miles from my home as opposed to a quilt shop or JoAnn's which is 30 miles away so if I run short it's not a problem. My Janome machine does not like Coats & Clark Dual Duty thread in the top. I can use it in the bobbin and so have been using up my odds and ends that way.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    I use connecting threads cotton thread or coats and clark thread. Sometimes I have problems most times I don't. If thread breaks I switch to a size 16 needle and no more problems.
    I am using coats and clark. I should clarify. It isn't breaking in the machine. The quilt is on my bed and I'm noticing little breaks here and there. It doesn't seem to be wearing well. Happening after the quilt is made. It is brand new thread.

  15. #15
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zyngawf View Post
    Why do so many of you like it? My most recent quilt seems to have several broken threads in the free motion quilting. I used something definitely meant for this. I have used polyester thread to quilt before and not had this much of a problem.
    Cotton thread is traditional because when vintage quilts were created, cotton was all that was available. I personally prefer polyester thread for machine quilting because it is stronger and creates less lint for my machine.

    There are multiple reasons why cotton thread might break after FMQing. One is the type and brand of thread. Some brands are better than others. Also, cotton thread can be stronger or weaker depending on the type of cotton in the thread (shorter or longer strands), how it is wound, weight, and ply (number of strands). Distance between quilting lines is another variable. Longer distances mean that more stress is put on individual threads when someone sits on a quilt, for example, or when the quilt is handled while heavy with water after washing. (Water adds a *lot* of weight to a quilt, which is one reason why you really do not want to hang a wet quilt on a clothesline.) Stitch length can also affect how much stress a thread can take, with long stitches breaking sooner than short stitches.

  16. #16
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Not all cotton quilting threads are a like. The higher end long staple egyptian cottons that are manufactured properly will be the ones you hardly have breakage on and there are very few of these imho i got breakage on many name brand cotton threads that are popular. If it is true egyptisn cotton thread it will not be cheap and will cost quite a bit
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

  17. #17
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    My quilting instructor of the first quilting class I ever took in 2006 and that got me hooked on quilting, recommended the book, "Machine Quilting Made Easy" by Maurine Noble, published by That Patchwork Place. The book is an excellent reference for its many charts showing which type of thread, weight of thread, type of needle, size of needle, etc. to be used together for best results. The book can be found on Amazon.com and you can "look inside" to see what the charts look like. I wouldn't be without this reference book.

  18. #18
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    I do not use 100% cotton thread for the quilting as I find that the thread will break when the quilt is used.

  19. #19
    Super Member rusty quilter's Avatar
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    I have used both..cotton seems to break more....Yes, yes...I have heard all cotton thread with cotton fabric...but I do not make Heirloom quilts....I try to make quilts that are used every day.

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