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Thread: Crazy Quilt

  1. #26
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatriceJ

    still need somebody to teach me how to cure my obsession with making sure all the colors "go together", though.

    ironic, ain't it? i'm too crazy to be able to make a crazy quilt.
    :shock:
    I suspect you just need to study my quilt blocks Patrice. You can tell I ain't too friendly with a color wheel.

    Step 1.) Drum into your head... "It's my quilt and I don't care if you don't like the colors."
    Step 2.) Never ask anyone... "Do these go together?" They might actually know.
    Step 3.) I like that Stack and Whack concept. Because you are so LB'ed, put all your dissimilar colors in the stack and rotate through them Mathematically. You get no choice as to what goes with what that way after you have set up the stack. Make more than one stack at a time with different fabrics. Halfway through, pull half the fabric squares off one stack (mathematically) and replace them with the fabric squares from the other stack. Keep cutting.
    Step 5.) If it seems right... "Don't use that combination."

    There is no step 4.

    tim in san jose

  2. #27
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    you had me until you said "math". why you wanna cuss at me like that?

    :shock:

    :mrgreen:

  3. #28
    Super Member sewmuch's Avatar
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    I took a crazy quilt class using 12 inch squares from muslin. Then
    sewed different fabrics onto it. I used the feather stitch and changed
    thread(embroidery) colors. Its fun to do, makes a great quilt.

  4. #29
    Senior Member GramMER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruth Camp
    This is part of my first 12 inch square I want to add a little more to it. I'm not happy with it. Next I will try one color.
    At 12 inches will make a nice crazy purse :roll:
    I am not really a "quilter" as most people describe them, but I have made a few and my mother made many in her lifetime. I remember one crazy quilt she made that seemed to follow the old fashioned method of stitching blocks to a piece of newspaper to be sure they were on the square. :? I watched, but never did one myself, but this seems to be something that would fit that.

    The lady who did it folded a sheet of newspaper into a triangle (once) and measured both sides to be sure they were 12 and 1/2 inches each. The extra 1/2 inch was the seam allowance. and then she cut the piece on the other two sides to make her square. She said that newspaper was alwyas on the square and there was no fear of "warped" pieces that way.

    The next step was to lay a piece of fabric on the corner and add another random piece to it. She called it strip piecing, but it was a far cry from what the books call strip piecing. Her pieces eventually made a few strips, but mostly they were like the ones you show in your photograph.

    The advantage I saw to her method was that the piecing went faster and the seams were very secure. She put each new piece onto the next one by laying it upside down where she wanted them to join. She stitched across to make a seam and then flipped the new piece down over the seam and pressed it. Then she was ready for another new strip or piece. She did not do the hand embroidery, but she did lap quilt each square before she put the whole quilt together. It really did look nice.

    BTW, this is my first time posting, so forgive my mistakes on what/how to do it. I am a grandmother (GramMER) to 15 and need to get the show on the road if I am to make each of them a quilt before my time comes. :roll:

    GramMER

  5. #30
    janiecurry's Avatar
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    I love the paper pieced blue bird and the oragami flower. They are beautiful. Just work on them till your heart says done, you'll know when to quit...

  6. #31
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    hey Patrice and Tim,
    It actually sounds like something I would try but now I don't know. The "M" word did set me back abit. I have been watching the new show on tv, "Are you smarter than a 5th grader....the "number" questions get me everytime, Don't tell anyone cuz quilters are supposed to be good at this stuff....

  7. #32
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    if most quilters were good at math, nobody could make a living selling patterns.
    :wink:

  8. #33
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    Janie- what are your favorite kinds of quilts to make and do you hand quilt or machine quilt. My husband bought me a hobby quilter from Nolting about three years ago and I do use it for plain block quilt designs that I make for gifts but for showing I hand quilt although it seems like my latest one is taking forever. can't seem to stay away from my sewing machine or crazy quilt. Don't think I'm going to make the April 30 deline for the currant quilt on the stretcher. May have to be next years entry at this rate.

  9. #34

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    I love your wall hanging. Great job and great ideas.

    I've made 2 crazy quilts and I'm still working on the second one. It's going to be wonderful when it's finished. What I did was use a square of muslin with the same size square of batting then I sewed the pretty fabric directly on the muslin (batting on the bottom). I then sewed and flipped the pretty fabric like someone else spoke of doing. I liked the result then when the block was all together I went back and did my decorative stitching. My first project was a bag. I got hooked on crazy scrap quilting with that bag but it is labor intensive. I'll attach a picture of the bag and block and the back side of the block..the bag is finished, the quilt isn't, yet! :>)

    Good luck, keep sewing.
    Randy
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #35
    Super Member Knot Sew's Avatar
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    I like that , now I want to make one of those. Would love to see your quilt when your finished. Did you use all machine stitches? It's hard to tell the difference. and I like your method

  11. #36
    Senior Member GramMER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randy
    I love your wall hanging. Great job and great ideas.

    I've made 2 crazy quilts and I'm still working on the second one. It's going to be wonderful when it's finished. What I did was use a square of muslin with the same size square of batting then I sewed the pretty fabric directly on the muslin (batting on the bottom). I then sewed and flipped the pretty fabric like someone else spoke of doing. I liked the result then when the block was all together I went back and did my decorative stitching. My first project was a bag. I got hooked on crazy scrap quilting with that bag but it is labor intensive. I'll attach a picture of the bag and block and the back side of the block..the bag is finished, the quilt isn't, yet! :>)

    Good luck, keep sewing.
    Randy

    Randy's finished products have exactly the look I was talking about except that the cloth I saw was either silk, velvet, satin, or some kind of other fancy material. Colors were impressive too. It had a really glitsy look in addition to the embroidery.

    Of course today's machines could easily do the embroidery--at least part of it.

    GramMER

  12. #37
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    Hi, you have to determine how far apart the 'repeat' is on your fabric. The further apart the repeat the more yardage you need. I started a stack n whack in a class 2 years ago but never finished it, I hope to maybe this year. My first recommendation is to get one of the stack n whack books at your library and see what the directions are and what is recommended. I believe I bought 5 yards based on my 'repeat'. some of the gals in class got 7 yds, but that seems too much, maybe they just wanted to be 'safe', or use some for the backing, I don't know.

  13. #38

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    Patrice & Sis, and anyone who'se interested.
    One way to get random is to take 3 sacks and sort your fabrices all the LIGHT into one sack (better label the sacks) the MEDIUMS another, and the DARKs into the third. On second thought don't label the sacks. You can put all the random sized scraps you have into the proper sack.
    Now measure out your base squares (which ever kind you want, even newspaper...but be aware that the ink may rub off. ) Now, have you got your sewing machine ready to roar. Good. Starting at the lovwer left corner of the base square (if you're left handed it's okay to start at the right corner.) Pick a piece of fabric out of one of the sacks. Okay, label the sacks "1", "2" & "3" so you can keep track. Pin that piece at the corner right side up, now take a second piece out of a different sack, place it wrong side up,and sew it on to the 1st piece with a 1/4" seam, with the directions as given by another reply-er, turn the 2nd piece right side up and finger press it flat. Now take a 3rd piece out of a sack, and add it to base following the previous directions. Keep adding pieces until the base is covered.
    You can take pieces from any of the sacks to add, no need to worry about whether the colors go together, or if they are light, medium or dark. Remember the quilts you've seen made with pink and orange, and even fushia (?). If the pieces don't quite fill the space, cover the "absent" spot with the next addition. Don't forget lace or ribbons, or something you have saved to use sometime.
    When, at last piece is added trim the edges of the base and start the second base. Hope that helps the matching Addition. When you have all the blocks finished start the embelishing (?) Have fun! LOL, Cecelia

  14. #39
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    that would work for a normal person. in fact it's an excellent way for a normal person to approach a crazy quilt and many other styles of scrap quilts. i mean that sincerely and wish i could do it that way.

    but i would have a nervous breakdown if i used a system that didn't remove as much choice from the process as possible. i guarantee you ... within 5 minutes i'd be fishing through the sacks looking for something that coordinated better. random really is nearly impossible for me to create. i like it when i see it. i just can't do it myself. if i create something that appears random, you can bet your bottom dollar it took me hours of painstaking effort to carefully place and coordinate each and every element so it ended up appearing to be random.
    the real irony here is that my house usually looks like a bomb just went off. go figure. :shock:

    (go ahead. let it out. it's ok to laugh. i'll be laughing right along with you. not all the nuts in Georgia grow on trees.)

    i'm going for the stack 'em, slash 'em, sew 'em & switch 'em method. (and i'm going to get somebody else to make the stacks and the first cuts so there's no goin' back.) it's my only hope. LOL

  15. #40
    Senior Member GramMER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wraez
    Hi, you have to determine how far apart the 'repeat' is on your fabric. The further apart the repeat the more yardage you need. I started a stack n whack in a class 2 years ago but never finished it, I hope to maybe this year. My first recommendation is to get one of the stack n whack books at your library and see what the directions are and what is recommended. I believe I bought 5 yards based on my 'repeat'. some of the gals in class got 7 yds, but that seems too much, maybe they just wanted to be 'safe', or use some for the backing, I don't know.
    For those who have specific color schemes in mind, purchasing is necessary, but if you sew much at all, there should always be enough scraps around to make a crazy quilt. Your friends and relatives probably have scraps and they usually are happy to share. I asked friends to save old silk ties for me, and intend to use them with other fancy cloth. I have seen some beautiful vests made from silk ties, but then I digress... :shock:

    GramMER

  16. #41
    Senior Member GramMER's Avatar
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    Did anyone see this site about making the Crazy Quilt?

    http://www.caron-net.com/classes/classmayfiles/clasmay1.html

    It probably is something everyone but me has already read, but I thought I would share just in case.

    GramMER

  17. #42

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    Sorry I wasn't more help. May I suggest you take a class, or read a book about crazy quilts. LOL, Cecelia :-)

  18. #43

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    I have some step by step instructions posted on this website.
    I hope it will help.

    http://ribbonsmyth.com/index.asp?PageAction=Custom&ID=27

  19. #44

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    When I sent an earllier I mentioned newspaper ink might rub off if used for a base in crazy quilt squares. Today I learned that if the papers ironed on both sides it sets the ink. (English Butlers would iron their Masters newspapers so they wouldn't get ink on their hands) Of course, we can have our Bulter iron our newspapers). I got the information, along with this one, if newspapers are stacked for 3 weeks the ink is set. Oh well, the Butler is on vacation. The Site for the information was the Quilting Connection an email I receive every month. It's has a extension from Quilters World. When I get her e-mail address I'll send it on,, LOL Cecelia

  20. #45

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    Hi, I'm back, Sandra L. Hatch is the Editor of Quilter's world and the e-mail comes every 3 weeks. The contact is: [email protected] Ok I hope that helps. Cecelia

  21. #46
    Boo
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    Been looking for a job for the butler. Thanks for the tip. :lol:

  22. #47

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    Ruth,

    By now you have probably already staarted and/or finished your Crazy Quilt, but if not, you mighht check our the "equilltpatterns.com" site. They have a patttern for a Stained Glass Crazy Quilt. I am making it Just a little larger as a graduation present for my grandaughter, and so far it's looking good. The way it goes together it does not require a foundation piece. Easy as the dickens.

    Good Luck!

    Donna

  23. #48

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    My first crazy quilt was made out of my Daddy's neckties. It turned out very nice and pleased my Mother greatly. Then my grandson requested one and I made his rather small. Now another grandson has put in his order for a Queen Size which I pray I'll live long enough to complete it. My younger brother met his death a few years ago in a tragic car accident and I have all his beautiful ties which I've been unable to cut up. Now I feel I'm able to do this since I have a mission to fulfill a promise to my grandson who is entering law school soon and hopefully, the quilt will be completed for his graduation! rk

  24. #49
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    get your grandson to cough up one of his own ties for each year of high school , college, and law school. use them in the border to "tie" together the generations.

    yeah ... i know it's a painful pun but i just couldn't resist!

    :wink:

  25. #50
    Super Member Quilt Mom's Avatar
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    I was wandering around the intenet recently, and found the quilter's cache (www.quilterscache.com) There were explicit instructions for a crazy quilt block that appeared simple, so I tried it. It was great! :D The method involves the foundation block, and has instructions on what to do to cover the block.

    Good luck on you crazy quilt!

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