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Thread: Cutting binding strips lengthwise rather than crossgrain

  1. #1
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    Cutting binding strips lengthwise rather than crossgrain

    Does it make a difference? I starched and cut my border strips length wise so that I wouldn't have to piece them. I ended up cutting them narrower than I originally calculated so now I have more fabric than I thought I would. I am planning to use the leftover for the binding. However, I've never made binding from a lengthwise cut before. Will it make a difference in the binding, not having the stretchiness of the crosswise cut?

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    It will not make a difference -- I do it all the time.

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    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    That's how a lot of patterns call for the borders to be cut. I, myself, actually like this way of cutting the borders better. You don't have seams, or less seams. It shouldn't make any difference. It would make a difference if cutting on the diagonal.
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    Super Member tatavw01's Avatar
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    you get less wobbling in you borders, actually you can cut everything that way

  5. #5
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Yes, lengthwise is best for borders, but you're asking about binding. For binding you can use those cuts, and I would since they're already cut, but it is generally easier to have a little more flexibility in the binding, which you get by bias or cross cuts.

  6. #6
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    I frequently use lengthwise grain for binding, especially when I've cut lengthwise for the borders like you did. I haven't found it makes any difference at all on a standard rectangular quilt with 90 corners. The corners miter beautifully without the added stretch. Don't worry about it.
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    Me too! I cut my borders lengthwise and use the leftover fabric for the binding.
    Quote Originally Posted by KSellers View Post
    It will not make a difference -- I do it all the time.

  8. #8
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    I used to use straight of grain cut bindings only. I did a baby quilt with rounded corners so I knew I needed to use binding cut on the bias. I have to tell you, IMHO, that binding cut on the bias is sooo much nicer to work with! I just made a rectangular quilt and I used binding cut on the bias. It has just enough stretch to it and I was able to get it sewed on just like that (hear my fingers snap?). I am a convert now to the bias binding!! I really don't know what I was so scared about?!?!
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    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    i never cut bindings on the bias. I always cut across the WOF and don't have a problem. I haven't done a binding along a curved quilt (like scalloped borders or a round quilt) so I can't comment on that.

  10. #10
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    IMHO, lengthwise grain is fine for binding a square or rectangular quilt, and especially for smaller quilts. No problem. It is my experience that the larger the quilt, the more easily the binding will go on with either a cross grain or a bias cut binding. Of course, with any edge that is not straight, you'll want a bias cut binding.

    And, of course, the above all depends on the experience of the quilter. You do what you're comfortable with, and what works best for you, naturally.
    MacThayer

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    I'm going to see how it goes this time. The quilt is strangely square this time. I think it was the way I measured and cut the borders because there was a lot of wonkyness in the blocks themselves. I did a bunch of easing so I'm surprised.

    Normally, I would just put the leftover fabric back in my stash but I heavily starched the entire length of fabric and I don't want to have starched fabric hanging around in my stash.

  12. #12
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    One thing to be particularly careful of due to the longer strips of fabric between the joining seams in lengthwise grain binding...plan it out so your seams do not wind up in the corners. It can mess up the miters and/or just not look as 'polished'.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    I don't think it matters really. They say bias bindings hold up better - and if you're doing a scalloped border then a straight grain border won't be stretchy enough to go around the curves so you'll have to do bias binding, but for a regular square or rectangular quilt I think you're fine. I have quilts that have been washed a hundred times in the washer and tossed in the dryer afterwards and their straight grain bindings are still holding up strong. (Doesn't matter if it's lengthwise or selvage to selvage, it's still straight of grain.) I can't say that it will live a hundred years after me, but I won't be around to be heartbroken about it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    One thing to be particularly careful of due to the longer strips of fabric between the joining seams in lengthwise grain binding...plan it out so your seams do not wind up in the corners. It can mess up the miters and/or just not look as 'polished'.
    Thanks, Ghostrider. I didn't really even think about that.

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    I have not had any problems using length of grain for binding. If I am dealing with a lot of yardage I subdivide it into 45" - 60" lengths by clipping and ripping. If I subdivide to around 45" I will have no more seams in my binding than if I had cut crosswise and it is an easy amount of fabric to deal with.
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  16. #16
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    You can use the lengthwise cut fabric for binding, but you may find that there is less "give" as you do your binding so it may be a bit harder to use. Most of the time I use bias binding as I like working with that the best.

  17. #17
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    The only difference would be the price of possibly using more yardage by going lengthwise instead of across. There would be more stretch in a crosswise cut as well.

  18. #18
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    It makes no difference. Sometime length is good if you are following a pattern in the fabric that is printed longwize. In these cases or even on the width it looks better to cut with the design and not with the grain.

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    You only need to cut binding on the bias is you are going around a curve. I just took a class at Raleigh sewing/quilt expo and one of the teachers there has a site that has the most watched video on the internet about binding. It's quilttv.com,
    Judy

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    Super Member SunlitenSmiles's Avatar
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    The most important part is that the seams do not end up on the corners and......

    That remaining fabric when the project is finished....be sure to wash the starch out before storing with other fabrics.....if necessary run zig zag or serge the cut edges to prevent fraying, but be sure to wash !

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    Quote Originally Posted by SunlitenSmiles View Post
    That remaining fabric when the project is finished....be sure to wash the starch out before storing with other fabrics.....if necessary run zig zag or serge the cut edges to prevent fraying, but be sure to wash !
    Yes, I am hoping that I can use it up with the binding, maybe I'll put some in the backing as well then I can just use it up and not worry about having to wash and store it. I've never starched a whole length of fabric before. I don't know what I was thinking.

  22. #22
    Super Member debbieoh's Avatar
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    Do it all the time. will work out great

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    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    I do it it both ways and never noticed a difference. I like using long pieces, less sewing pieces together.

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