Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 56

Thread: cutting strips

  1. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    859
    I hate to admit it but, I CAN NOT cut a straight strip to save my life. I THINK I'm folding the fabric evenly....I hold it up in front of myself and "walk"it back and forth with my fingers until it hangs smoothly, BUT, I always have that V. I have given up even trying this method and I just cut the length of my rules and piece strips together if I need them long. It sounds easy, and I may be the only one who cannot do it.....can anyone help me??

  2. #27
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Wintersewer View Post
    I hate to admit it but, I CAN NOT cut a straight strip to save my life. I THINK I'm folding the fabric evenly....I hold it up in front of myself and "walk"it back and forth with my fingers until it hangs smoothly, BUT, I always have that V. I have given up even trying this method and I just cut the length of my rules and piece strips together if I need them long. It sounds easy, and I may be the only one who cannot do it.....can anyone help me??
    I wonder if you are understanding how that V comes about. Getting the fold even with the selvedges has nothing to do with it. The angle of the ruler in relation to the fold is what determines that V. If the ruler is at an exact 90-degree angle to the fold, you will not get a V. If the angle of the ruler is off by 2 degrees or more, you will have a V.

    You can check this out with a piece of paper. Fold the paper in half. Cut a strip with the ruler as perpendicular to the fold as you can get. Cut another strip with the ruler angled a little from the fold. Cut a final strip with the ruler angled even more from the fold. When you smooth out those strips, you will find that the farther the angle gets from the fold, the deeper the V in the strip.

    When working with fabric, it's important to line up the fold with the longest ruler edge you can find. This is why it is often a good idea to use two rulers. Line up the cutting ruler, then butt another ruler against it with its longer edge along the fold. You want the fold to line up with the second ruler as far as it goes. This ensures that your 90-degree angle on your cutting ruler really is 90 degrees and not 87 degrees or 93 degrees from the fold.

  3. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    157
    I LOVE the Shape Cut Ruler also. I found that the Fiskers cutter fits the slots better. I got mine from my sister because she couldn't get her cutter to fit right till I read the Fiskers was better then I had to buy my own and she bought the other cutter.

  4. #29
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    7,752
    Me, too. but it took a lot of practice to be able to do it! I also sprayed the back of my ruler with basting spray so that it 'grips' the fabric and doesn't shift. At first the back of the ruler was too sticky, but after a little gentle buffing with a scrap of fabric, the 'sticky' is now perfect.

    I have the slotted rulers, use them occasionally, too, but not for cutting strips.

  5. #30
    Senior Member emlee51's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Big Sky Country
    Posts
    669
    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    For most strips I use my 24" ruler. I line a square ruler up to the fold onmy right and the long ruler up against the side of the square one and make my first cut to get it straight. Then I cut the strips I want and even up again every two or three cuts, this keeps them straight.
    This is what I do...no problem.

  6. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    859
    You lost me here. I assume that you are right handed..??...so you are cutting with your right hand. How can the square ruler be on your right? Isn't the fold at the top or bottom? SORRY to be so dense about this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jingle View Post
    For most strips I use my 24" ruler. I line a square ruler up to the fold onmy right and the long ruler up against the side of the square one and make my first cut to get it straight. Then I cut the strips I want and even up again every two or three cuts, this keeps them straight.

  7. #32
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,656
    Blog Entries
    2
    I was wasting fabric by having to cut out the V from one out of two cuts. I have tried every method known to quilters how to not have the V in the middle of strips. Each method works sometimes but not every time. I bought the Alto2, then the Shape Cut ruler, then the Go. The Go is the only way that works perfectly every time for me no matter if the fabric is straight or not.
    Got fabric?

  8. #33
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Silicon Valley in CA
    Posts
    1,828
    The fabric needs to be lined up right first before cutting to avoid that 'v'. When the selvages are together, move one piece of fabric back and forth until there is no wave in the fabric. Now cut off the uneven egde and then start cutting your strips. After cutting several strips, check to make sure you are not getting that dreaded 'v'. If you are, you will need to realign the selvages again as mentioned above.

  9. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    859
    This is just how I do it, and I get the V every time. Some how I'm missing something.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jannie View Post
    The fabric needs to be lined up right first before cutting to avoid that 'v'. When the selvages are together, move one piece of fabric back and forth until there is no wave in the fabric. Now cut off the uneven egde and then start cutting your strips. After cutting several strips, check to make sure you are not getting that dreaded 'v'. If you are, you will need to realign the selvages again as mentioned above.

  10. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    859
    Thanks Prism, I think I will try your method. I may have been paying attention to the wrong things.


    "I wonder if you are understanding how that V comes about. Getting the fold even with the selvedges has nothing to do with it. The angle of the ruler in relation to the fold is what determines that V. If the ruler is at an exact 90-degree angle to the fold, you will not get a V. If the angle of the ruler is off by 2 degrees or more, you will have a V."

  11. #36
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,656
    Blog Entries
    2
    If the angle of the ruler is off by 2 degrees or more, you will have a V.

    Yep, too much hassle cutting strips with a ruler for me.
    Got fabric?

  12. #37
    Member JReadman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southern Utah
    Posts
    89
    Here is a You Tube video that shows the method I've been using with success and have never gotten a "V" - I do iron the fabric very well & the fold before cutting.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=1ebyZrgkIbk
    Here's another good one http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=E4Xz2CkKTUY
    “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
    The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

    ~ Dr. Seuss

  13. #38
    Senior Member leighway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    N. Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    801
    June Taylor ruler has made an odious chore a pleasure. I just have to be careful and not cut a whole piece of fabric up for strips...it's so easy to get slicing with this. I have a couple of them so I can choose depending on the size of the fabric.

  14. #39
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Southeast Va
    Posts
    245
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yes, I love this too, but make sure your blade is really sharp!!!!!
    Quote Originally Posted by gollytwo View Post
    The June Taylor Shape Cut Ruler that Prism99 recommended is a really useful tool to own

  15. #40
    Senior Member sewhat540's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Cheektowaga, NY
    Posts
    394
    Ripping the fabric is the way to go. As fabric is made it is put on huge rollers and as you must have seen even in the fabric shops coming off the bolt they are not straight. So, yes, ripping is the way to go. That short time it takes make a huge difference in the ending of the project. Thanks Lori for posting this. I like going thru messages to just remind me of things I learned years ago.

  16. #41
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,656
    Blog Entries
    2
    Ripping will tell you if you have good made fabric! If not, the fabric will stretch and be worse off then before ripping and you'll lose six or more inches getting it straight.
    Got fabric?

  17. #42
    Senior Member Michellesews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    El Paso Texas
    Posts
    988
    I also use mat with slits, I have two of them, a large and an extra large. It makes cutting multiple strips a breeze, but when I only need one or two strips, I use the ruler.
    Michelle Guadarrama

  18. #43
    Super Member yetta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Manassas Va.
    Posts
    1,236
    The june taylor has been a big help to me in cutting strips straight....
    Proud Mother of Sarah Grey
    Grey's Fabric and Notions
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/greysfabric?ref=seller_info

  19. #44
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,929
    AND, what IF you don't wash and dry them and they shrink after your quilt is all beautifully done if you haven't heavily quilted it? I shudder to think of what the outcome would be and I don't want my quilts to look puckered up after all that work.[/QUOTE]

    True about fabric not being square enough off the bolt most of the time.....when I work with yardage, I will rip the end to get a straight, if it is way off, I will have someone hold two corners, I hold two and we diagonally pull on that fabric to get it straight, then even off that edge........as far as washing/drying.........first I will say I do not "wash/dry" all my fabric...if there is one I am in doubt of, I will cut off a piece, put in a cup of hot water and see if it bleeds, if so, I will replace it with another. I can't see the sensibility of "washing/drying" in washing machine and dryer....waste all that water, use all that electricity....our quilting sisters of the past just cut and sewed....and the puckers are the quilt's kisses!!!! JMHO

  20. #45
    Super Member Quiltngolfer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    3,419
    I use the June Taylor Shape Cut Plus. It is quick and easy! You can cut pieces for a quilt in no time. It is a little pricey, but well worth it. I use mine all the time.

  21. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    737
    June Taylor's ruler is the best for strip cutting.

  22. #47
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Littlefield, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,094
    Do you have a rotary cutter and mat? The trick, using the rotary cutter and mat is in the folding of the fabric. When you fold the fabric for cutting, pinch each fold...all along the edge of the fold, smoothing away from the fold as you go...you want to keep the folds inside right against the outter fold...if you don't, you get waves/jogs in the strip. I first press out the fold that is from the material being on the bolt (it's not always straight), then I fold from selvage to selvage, matching the selvages as close as I can, smoothing away from the fold as I go, this gives me a 20" width to cut width of fabric strips. If I need to, I fold a 2nd time fold to selvages...pinching along the new fold to make sure the inside fold stays right at the outter fabric..that's the key...keep the inside fabric right at the outside fabric at the fold. This gives me about 10-11" width of fabric to cut. I try to do about a yard at a time because I have limited cutting space. Even if I am doing binding...I cut width of fabric (there is a bit of give). I rarely do bias binding.

    If I need to cut borders, say 100" long... I fold the fabric cut edge to cut edge..smooth and press the fold. I then fold again...and that gives me 25" length...I use my 24" ruler to cut the strips...I first line the edge of the ruler with the folded edge of the fabric...and cut off the selvage on the side I'm going to get the borders from...then I again check by pinching that all the inside folds are against the outer fold (again, that is the key to no waves in the cut)..and cut my borders...making sure to stop, move my hand up, cut, stop, move my hand and the ruler up, cut..only cutting where the reach of my hand is..that's all the control of the cut that you have. Since I started doing this...I get nice straight cuts. Once you learn the process..you get better as you go...it will be 2nd nature.

    Quote Originally Posted by sunny42539 View Post
    Does anybody know how to cut strips quickly? The only way I know how to cut them straight is to pull threads. I could make a top in the time it takes to cut the strips.
    Thanks
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot V3 automated quilter
    https://www.facebook.com/campbellsquiltingbymarge

  23. #48
    Super Member margecam52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Littlefield, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,094
    Remember, when cutting jelly rolls, it's width of fabric (44" or so). If you are using a scissors to cut strips...mark with chalk and cut on the outside of the line...that's where the ruler line is.

    If I know I have a good cotton fabric (don't throw stuff at me)...I tear the fabric. Some top printed fabrics (especially dark prints) do not do well with tearing them...the white base will show through. Once I have the fabrics torn, I spray with water, let them rest and press the strips...pressing them damp, pressing from the center out to the torn edges will, if it's good cotton fabric, reset any distortion from the tearing. If the fabric has any polyester in it..this does not work well at all.
    Marge Campbell
    TL18LS/Qbot V3 automated quilter
    https://www.facebook.com/campbellsquiltingbymarge

  24. #49
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,952
    Blog Entries
    1
    Ripping fabric is not always a good idea. For one thing, ripping damages fabric up to 2 inches away from the rip. Some of this damage is microscopic, meaning you cannot see it unless you examine the fabric under a microscope. After ripping, it's a good idea to slice off at least 1 inch of fabric so you are not sewing seams on damaged fabric.

    Ripping along the lengthwise grain is not as bad as ripping along the crosswise grain. There is not as much distortion and damage along the lengthwise grain. That is why I will rip fabric when I need long pieces for borders (although I make the strip wider and still trim the ripped edges to get rid of any damage before using the pieces).

    Straight-of-grain is really important in dressmaking because grain affects how the fabric drapes on the body. It has a different role in quilting, in that grain primarily affects edges -- and how much handling an edge can take before it becomes distorted. A bias edge, for example, will stretch out of shape much more easily than an on-grain edge when piecing. A bias edge is preferable for turned-under applique because it will turn under more easily on a curve than a straight-grain will.

    Just sayin'.........

  25. #50
    Super Member glenda5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    NE Kansas
    Posts
    1,086
    Another vote for the June Taylor Shape Cut rulers...the reliable way to cut straight strips.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.