Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 50 of 50

Thread: Designing Quilt Patterns

  1. #26
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would like to say WELCOME to one of the most over rated, under paid job markets in the country! Being a quilt pattern designer is like being a stand up comedian! You are only going to appeal to about 1% of the industry market and you have to hope what you have will be enough to make it!

    You can join a group at yahoogroups.com that is just for professional pattern designers. They really give you all the dirt, and all the help you need!

    Aside from that, I would ad, that you should NEVER create your pattern in EQ...and do ALL your research before putting it out into the world! Like the name....google it first...nothing worse that finding out after you print 500 copies that there is another pattern out there with the same or close to the same name!
    Search the copyright files to see if anyone already owns the name!
    Learn your copyright laws!
    Go to markets/shows and meet your peers!

    Make sure what your are doing is different! Unique...BUT not the same thing over and over. Case in point, a really nice Engineer lady decided she could design quilt patterns. I did testing for her and teach her techniques, BUT check out her stuff....http://www.quiltswithatwist.com
    look at all those patterns...see a trend....yeah...she is stuck in a box....she keeps reproducing the same LOOK with different fabrics...boring....

    another one I know self-publishes and publishes for others.
    http://www.http://www.ashtonpub.com/books.htm
    again...can you look at her stuff and ask, well, how long can you ride the applique pony??? Once you do simple fusible applique, you have done it, you don't need a new class every year...or a new book! She is in a rut now too!

    Add to that the fact that every person that owns EQ. quilt pro, quilt wizard, etc, etc, can replicate 99.9% of any pattern they can gleen a pix of off the internet, and you have an over crowded, lack luster amount of people trying to hawk patterns to distributors, magazines, trade shows, etc.

    I do know that there are now people who design QUILT patterns and sell those same patterns cheaper to pattern companies! Several designers in the McCalls pattern book also sell in quilt shops..and you pay more for the same pattern in the quilt shop!

    For all the good the internet has given us, it has also created a monster when it comes to youtube videos, blogs with tutes, etc....all a person needs to do is know how to google and they can find a pattern for anything right in their own living room at 3am....legal or not, they will print it off and your sewing machine pattern will never be seen nor sold...because somebody made one on a youtube tutorial FREE for the world!

  2. #27
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthernDeb
    Thank you all for these ideas.
    Do you like amounts to be more exact or do you like a little wiggle room? I would think adding an 1/8 wouldn't be so bad but if you add that to every fabric called for.. and sometimes it's many, many fabrics.. well, that just adds to the final cost. But I suppose if someone made an error in cutting and the fabric was no longer available, then it would be a good thing....

    It is frustrating to end up with leftover fabric, but that is way better than ending up short. Here is what one must remember when they are either buying or designing a pattern.

    #1- not all fabric manufactures use the same amount of selvage edge, so fabric widths vary!
    #2- not all fabric purchasers will WASH that fabric properly BEFORE cutting it, let alone sewing it...those who do wash it know that you can lose up 8% in shrinkage!
    #3- those who DO NOT wash before hand find that when steaming pieces, they do not fit together, so they have to cut more...
    #4- not all people who buy that pattern are going to use non-directional fabric, so if they want to fussy cut, match stripes, etc. they will need MORE fabric..
    #5- not all people can walk into the LQS and but more of that fabric..they used the internet, bought while traveling, etc...so they need MORE right off the bat...

    A pattern designer has to go with the highest amount of fabric possibly needed to please the vast majority of people who will use that pattern! HOWEVER, it would be nice if the designer put in a statement that read
    "DUE TO THE HIGH COST FABRIC, I WOULD LIKE YOU KNOW THAT THIS PATTERN HAS ENOUGH FABRIC TO ALLOW FOR SMALL MISTAKES, SHRINKAGE IN PRE-WASHING, OR TO USE FOR SMALL COORDINATING ITEMS"

    MOST designers use at least 3 pattern testers to make sure things are kosher before publishing, those 3 results will vary greatly and with good reason...different machine=different seams, different tastes in fabric= different amounts required...and so on!

    Designing, creating, and publishing a pattern is not a one size fits all quilters deed!

  3. #28
    Super Member quiltjoey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    2,052
    Sweet!!!! Love your southwestern quilt for you brother!! Good luck with your creative ideas of pattern making. If they are as good as the SW one, you'll do great. Keep on keeping on....

  4. #29
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by luvspaper
    It is also confusing about how much of what colors you need. I think part of it has to do with a language barrier. I am actually thinking of selling it because of those reasons.

    Good luck! I'd love to see more of your work!
    Before you put down someone because of the language barrier or the "lost in translation" theory, how about contacting the designer?
    Have you been to her website to see if any corrections to that pattern have been made?

    I can't tell you how frustrating it is as a shop owner to have a customer come in and start complaining about how bad a pattern was, and when I asked them if they contacted the designer or checked the website, they look at me and say NO, YOU should have done that before you sold it...WHAT...I just order the patterns, I don't test them alll!
    But I have found that over the years it pays to go the website and check for updates/corrections!
    Point in fact. A very popular designer put out a collection of patterns 2 years ago...one of those that when you bought all of the patterns it cost you about $120.00 PLUS there were embellishing kits adding another $85.oo...OY....and as soon as those patterns were released, the website was posting corrections...simple things really like cutting 5 1/8" not 5 7/8"..but still...frustrating for everyone involved!

    Last week I wanted to make a shop sample, I opened the pattern and began reading the direction, I looked over and over and over...and could not figure out how I was to make a 10" frog out of tracing those 2" designs...I finally gave up and said, ok.,,I am 50, blonde and not a college grad, but really, something MUST be missing here...I contacted the designer and found out that only did that pattern not have the 2 pages of pattern pieces, but NONE of the 12 patterns I had ordered had them....talk about upsetting the designer...who now has to track down the last shipments to all of her distributors and find out how many more had missing pages....UGH....

    It pays to stop and ask if there is something missing!

  5. #30
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    ONE more point about going PRO...if you are serious about it, then you must NEVER put a pix of anything you plan to publish on the internet..not even in your FLICKR type photo albums...
    once it can be seen on the internet, it is considered published, and if someone snipes it, and can publish before you...well...it gets ugly...

    also if you plan to do some magazine patterns first to test your waters...do NOT put pix on the internet or show at guild, nothing....any pix of it can lead to the same path as above!

    People don't realize that when they post pix of their quilts that they are in fact "publishing" them. Many of the upper quilt shows now will not allow quilts that have been PUBLISHED...if they google your name or the quilt entry name and that quilt comes up, it is pulled...and not entered!

    Don't you just love the internet???

  6. #31
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,029
    Actually yes, I have checked her website....honestly her patterns are for the very advance quilters who can go on limited directions. No, I have not emailed her.

    If the basic instructions are terrible including fabric yardage, it scares me to even try..... The one I have is "listen with your eyes" -- it is a gorgeous quilt! I bought it at IQF in Houston last year. I have bought a Judy Niemeyer for about the same cost and her directions are 1000 times better.

    It's sad because Be Colourful has some amazing quilt designs.....

  7. #32
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,383
    Quote Originally Posted by NorthernDeb
    Do you like amounts to be more exact or do you like a little wiggle room? I would think adding an 1/8 wouldn't be so bad but if you add that to every fabric called for.. and sometimes it's many, many fabrics.. well, that just adds to the final cost. But I suppose if someone made an error in cutting and the fabric was no longer available, then it would be a good thing....
    I always wonder if the designer had wiggle room . And because I have no way of knowing I end up adding because the life cycle ( amount of time it will be available from manufacture) of fabric is now so short. It aways ends up that I have to make that decision at the cutting counter, and because of past publishing or my mishap, I end up adding , and then have more leftover. One of the reasons I purchase patterns is to eliminate the whole question of "how much do I really need question". If the yardages are acqurate it can actually cover the cost of the pattern, because I add too much of a fudge factor when I design or plan a quilt.

  8. #33
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,383
    Quote Originally Posted by luvspaper
    Actually yes, I have checked her website....honestly her patterns are for the very advance quilters who can go on limited directions. No, I have not emailed her.

    If the basic instructions are terrible including fabric yardage, it scares me to even try..... The one I have is "listen with your eyes" -- it is a gorgeous quilt! I bought it at IQF in Houston last year. I have bought a Judy Niemeyer for about the same cost and her directions are 1000 times better.

    It's sad because Be Colourful has some amazing quilt designs.....
    I have contacted and comunicated with the designer, but becasue of the launguage barier its her husband ( who does the transalations for her patterns) that replies. The answer was "we are working on it".
    Having been quilting for over 40 years , when I purchase a patten its because I do not want to take the time to draft it myself. and am looking for someone else to to some of the thinking for me , for a change. It is enourmously agravating to spend the big bucks , and have terms that do not even apply to the quilt pattern. For example it called for "insert piping" in the
    directions when there was no piping in the quilt nor would piping in that part make any sense at all. It was clearly a translation issue but was left with a very real lack of confidence in the whole pattern. It could have been avoided on the designers part if someone who has any skills would have reviewed the instructions.
    When I am spending the big bucks for a pattern , I also have the expectation the designer would have included any tips they used/learned for making the quilt.
    Bottom line I will spend the big bucks for a pattern but will not buy another from that designer if the first one was a bad experience.

  9. #34
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    I hear a lot of complaining about Patterns....have you considered buying books instead?
    publishing patterns is more costly and time consuming than books. Most publishing companies won't even do patterns any more, so for the most part, patterns are SELF published.
    What most NEW designers do not realize is that it is cheaper and just as much work to put together a Booklet of 3-4 patterns! When it comes time to copyright them you pay the same for one copy right on a pattern as you do on a book that might have as many of 12 patterns in it! There by they cover the copyright on 12 different patterns in ONE easy shot!

    There are a lot more books coming around at the $15-$20 price range that contain upwards of 10+ patterns in them, making them a greater value all around!

  10. #35
    Super Member jojosnana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Farmington Hills, Michigan
    Posts
    5,648
    Gorgeous quilt and good luck with your pattern creations. Keep us up to date. I see you are in Michigan. Me too.
    Hi neighbor.

  11. #36
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,029
    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    I hear a lot of complaining about Patterns....have you considered buying books instead?
    Definitely moving that way. I would say in my last 10 pattern purchases, 9 were books! But unfortunately some designers (Judy and Jacqueline for example) don't publish in book form. And honestly their patterns are so advanced that I can't imagine being able to put too many into one book. So I think if you want a very advanced quilt, you sometimes have to go with a pattern. And with very advanced quilts, the directions must be written concisely and well. After making a Judy Niemeyer quilt, I made the mistake of expecting the Be Colourful one to be done just as well....my mistake!

  12. #37
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    214
    Wow, this is a fascinating topic! I usually make quilts from books, but have bought a few patterns with fairly good results. I also agree that the directions must be very clear, with as many pictures/diagrams as possible. I love the quilt you made for your brother, you are very talented. Good luck in your pattern making quest!

  13. #38
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    [/quote]
    When I am spending the big bucks for a pattern , I also have the expectation the designer would have included any tips they used/learned for making the quilt .[/quote]


    Depending on the designers experience, she might not consider what she did a TIP, but just step in the process!

    Do not for a moment fool yourselfs into thinking that just because this designer is Dutch and there might be a translation issue that this is only happening with her patterns. EVERY designer if you go to the their websites will have a page of pattern corrections.
    Some are only minor things, but some can be huge differences in the amount of fabric you buy/need, some have directions left out, some are missing pieces....
    Publishing a pattern is a long process....it requires more than one set of eyes to proof read and more than one set of skills to TEST the pattern....
    and much to your surprise I am sure, it is NOT always the pattern designers mistakes, directions are easily misinterpreted as well!

  14. #39
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,383
    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    I hear a lot of complaining about Patterns....have you considered buying books instead?
    publishing patterns is more costly and time consuming than books. Most publishing companies won't even do patterns any more, so for the most part, patterns are SELF published.
    What most NEW designers do not realize is that it is cheaper and just as much work to put together a Booklet of 3-4 patterns! When it comes time to copyright them you pay the same for one copy right on a pattern as you do on a book that might have as many of 12 patterns in it! There by they cover the copyright on 12 different patterns in ONE easy shot!

    There are a lot more books coming around at the $15-$20 price range that contain upwards of 10+ patterns in them, making them a greater value all around!
    I have found some major errors in books as well. Not sure if it is the rush to print or what , but one book I purchased in the last year had 56 pages with errors. I would have had no way of knowing except I over heard someone discussing which edition they had, because the first edition had so many errors. To my shock I thought I could trade in my bad edition for the better one, so I would not have to have a book with all these extra papers I had to stick in with the corrections printed.... But nope , I was told no such exchange was possible. One or two errors Ok .. I could mark up my edition but 56 pages with errors thats just careless on the more than one persons part and I would have thought the publisher would have wanted to restore their reputation.

  15. #40
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Enid, OK
    Posts
    8,922
    Blog Entries
    1
    MAn,,,I check all the books I order in, and occasionally one will have a small slip of paper saying there is a correction...but 56....I would pulled that book off the market and demanded a reprint!

  16. #41
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,029
    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    EVERY designer if you go to the their websites will have a page of pattern corrections.
    Well, if you can find it on Be Colourful's website at: http://www.becolourful.nl/en/index.htm that would be wonderful. They do have a tab called "be helpful" but that is just a form to fill out to email a question.

    Honestly she is very creative and makes very beautiful quilts, she just does not do a good job translating her skills well into designing. Not everyone who has a skill is a good person to teach that skill to someone else.

  17. #42

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    601
    You don't pay for a copyright.

    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok
    I hear a lot of complaining about Patterns....have you considered buying books instead?
    publishing patterns is more costly and time consuming than books. Most publishing companies won't even do patterns any more, so for the most part, patterns are SELF published.
    What most NEW designers do not realize is that it is cheaper and just as much work to put together a Booklet of 3-4 patterns! When it comes time to copyright them you pay the same for one copy right on a pattern as you do on a book that might have as many of 12 patterns in it! There by they cover the copyright on 12 different patterns in ONE easy shot!

    There are a lot more books coming around at the $15-$20 price range that contain upwards of 10+ patterns in them, making them a greater value all around!

  18. #43
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Posts
    13,872
    I published a pattern last year, a quilt similar to my avatar, and I don't really expect to publish another. I only did that one because I had so many requests from board members. I have had far more pattern sales than I expected, almost all through this board. I am selling a few on ebay as well.

    Jaciqltznok has brought up a lot of valid points. When I decided to make my pattern, I bought Publish Your Patterns by Nancy Restuccia. I highly recommend that book. When it came time to calculate yardage (I had an advanced Excel spreadsheet set up) I came up with an algorithm and listed it in the pattern:

    "The fabric requirements on the back of the cover page are computed to allow for some squaring up and shrinkage. In general they are calculated by computing the length of fabric needed across the WOF (assuming 40 usable inches in WOF), adding 3", and rounding up to the nearest quarter yard. They do not allow for making experimental blocks, excessive shrinkage, or misadventure while cutting or sewing. It is always a good idea to buy a little extra if you can."

    When it came to testing, I asked 6 members of the board to test, thinking that maybe 3 would agree, and was astonished when all 6 agreed to test. Not all finished the quilt, but all of them did give me good input. In fact, most of the testers had trouble with one aspect of the quilt. This led me to completely re-think the techniques, re-write the pattern, and invent the paper template to be included with the pattern.

    My main advice would be to consider the numbers and your purpose. If you sell your pattern to quilt stores, they will give you only 50% of the retail price, and you still have to pay for the printing and packaging of the pattern. Wholesalers take a bigger percentage, so you may be paying all the expenses of pattern production from as little as 25% of the sales price. If you're doing this for the income, you may be disappointed. (I would say that you probably will be disappointed, except that the quilt you showed us is so spectacular.) If you're doing it to share your patterns with others, you will be blessed by the positive comments and friendships that develop. Good luck!

    As far as Judy Niemeyer's patterns go, they are beautiful. I own 7, have made 1, am in the process of making another, but I have found a number of significant errors already in the pattern I'm making, and they are not addressed in the online corrections. I have sent an email to her, but haven't heard back yet. One of the errors was that she said to cut 40 strips, where only 20 were needed. I would have been pretty upset if I had not caught that one before cutting. I always check over the math in the patterns before cutting.

  19. #44
    Junior Member Judi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Michigan & Arizona
    Posts
    109

    SW bed quilt

    Quote Originally Posted by NorthernDeb View Post
    This is a quilt I designed for my brother-in-law who has a home in Arizona. He lets us stay in his home down there for a couple of months each winter. This was a thank you quilt for him and his wife. It's not a pattern that I plan to sell... I just designed it for him.

    I'm really hoping to hear what you all are looking for. I see that some of the ladies want sewing machine cover patterns. I'm going to get right to work on one of those. What else does everyone want?

    Looking for a southwest pattern for a king sized bed in our new AZ home. Any ideas?

  20. #45
    Super Member hobo2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Boonsboro, MD
    Posts
    2,721
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by amandasgramma View Post
    I would LOVE to see patterns that have cutting instructions added for just ONE block. I like to test the blocks before I begin and cut out all the fabric. just in case..........
    Also -- because I have a longarm...I LOVE seeing how the designer would quilt the pattern.
    I agree completely. I make one block, then decide if I change something or go on, or even ditch the whole idea. Please put me on the list for anything southwestern or Indian. Good patterns, with original SW design elements are impossible to find on the east coast. The other problem I have with patterns, I usually design my own quilts, they take two old standby quilt blocks, give them a new layout, and call it a "new design". Let's have "new quilt blocks".

  21. #46
    Super Member sewmom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Midland, Michigan
    Posts
    1,950
    Northerndeb, very stunning quilt. It sounds like you have been given a lot to consider with your patterns/publishing. Good luck with that endeavor. I see you said northern lower Michigan- are you anywhere near Cheboygan? We are up there most of the summer, maybe we could get together and chat.
    A time to tear, And a time to sew;
    A time to keep silence, And a time to speak;

  22. #47
    Junior Member NorthernDeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by sewmom View Post
    Northerndeb, very stunning quilt. It sounds like you have been given a lot to consider with your patterns/publishing. Good luck with that endeavor. I see you said northern lower Michigan- are you anywhere near Cheboygan? We are up there most of the summer, maybe we could get together and chat.
    I live about an hour north of TC... so not too far from Cheboygan. My fav quilt shops up there are Hearts To Holly in Charlevoix and Cousin's in Belaire. When do you arrive up here? I stay all year, except for a month or so when I head to AZ ... to warm up!
    www.northerndeb.blogspot.com

  23. #48
    Junior Member NorthernDeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by Judi View Post
    Looking for a southwest pattern for a king sized bed in our new AZ home. Any ideas?
    Judi, I am in the process of creating a pattern of this southwest quilt. We've had some major family illness and now a wedding this summer that has slowed my progress. When the pattern is complete I will post something about it on this forum. I think it would be a good idea for me to make it in 3 sizes... lap, queen and king. From what I hear from customers at the quilt shop I work at is that they like when there are options in sizing.
    www.northerndeb.blogspot.com

  24. #49
    Junior Member NorthernDeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by hobo2000 View Post
    I agree completely. I make one block, then decide if I change something or go on, or even ditch the whole idea. Please put me on the list for anything southwestern or Indian. Good patterns, with original SW design elements are impossible to find on the east coast. The other problem I have with patterns, I usually design my own quilts, they take two old standby quilt blocks, give them a new layout, and call it a "new design". Let's have "new quilt blocks".
    I agree that quilt patterns should be a WHOLE new idea. I like something that grabs me... not the same old thing over and over. And the other thing I hate is to see a quilt made up and designed to use a line of fabric and only that line. Most seem to get too busy... there isn't any resting area for the eye. I like to see a plain area for some of the quilting to show. I DO like some of the really old vintage quilts... like from the 40s... that are made up in a modern fabric. It's fun to see what some of the new, younger quilters are coming up with. My daughters alway surpise me by taking a standard block and doing something completely different than I'm used to. But then they don't know the expected way to set these blocks... they just get creative.
    One thing I know is that quilting seems to be going through another large change...the beginning of another era. I've been checking out appliqued quilts that are created from vintage patterns but use Kaffe or Amy Butler types of fabrics instead of solids... AND they're setting these on a background of soft gray instead of cream or white. Amazing and wonderful quilts in the future!
    www.northerndeb.blogspot.com

  25. #50
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    696
    I would copyright every one. I think it costs about $15 for a copyright. I know you can go have it done at a university, or at least they can help you. I would also get a business license, local to you. Then you can write off your expense, the room you are working in, etc. Do it the right way from the beginning. There are people out there that can help you but be smart and upfront with your questions. Find out from the BBB who you can trust. You don't want other people copying your patterns. By the way, I just love the one you made. You better have that one copyrighted or someone else will after seeing it. Get someone who can sew good to make up a quilt from your pattern. Good luck

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.