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Thread: dilemma with sewing room floor

  1. #26
    Senior Member GiGi's Avatar
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    Why not put your pool table to use as a wonderful cutting table/sewing table? Just a thought. GiGi :D :D :D :D :D

  2. #27
    Junior Member sandiphi's Avatar
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    I do have puzzle pieces already on my floor. I used them around the pool table, prior to selling it. I will be using them once my room is complete, around my long arm, feels good on the feet. I did use my pool table as a cutting table, as a table to lay out and pin my quilts. But, that is now gone, on to better things.

    I went to home depot and found that my solution is an easy one. To eliminate a lot of time and hard work, we chose to go with a product called Traffic Master Allure. It is a floating resilient plank flooring. It does not adhere to the existing floor, it adheres to itself. It is flexible and easy to cut and install. Looks just like a wood floor. It is going to be a little pricey but well worth it. I don't have to scrape the old paint off. Vinyl tiles won't work too well on the cement according to the lady at home depot. And carpet wasn't my first choice.

    So thanks for all your suggestions. I am now psyched again to work on this room and get it done. The floor should be done by this weekend, I hope. :mrgreen:

  3. #28
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    i was going to say the rubber puzzle floor pieces.

    i have them in my gym and i love them. its easy to clean and easy on the body/feet.

    i have carpeting in my sewing room and i hate it for all the same reasons listed - pins are hard to find, thread is every where and its so hard to get up, rolling around the work space is a challenge. it was already in the room when we moved here - so i had no choice.

    if i were to start over i'd go for the rubber floor puzzle pieces for sure - you can get them at walmart real cheap.

  4. #29
    Cookn's Avatar
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    When you install your floating floor, do yourself a favor, install it over the foam underlayment. It will add a bit more expense to the floor but it adds a bunch to the package. It cushions, insulates, protects, and extends the life of the floor. I worked in and around Home Depots for almost 15 years and laid many floors in kitchen displays and flooring displays. The Depot has changed many things and one is the knowledge base of it's associates. If they flooring associate didn't recommend the foam underlayment, they should have for all the above reasons. I would also put a barrier of thin vinyl (like a painters drop cloth) between your rubber flooring and the laminate. Just something to stop contact of the neoprene of the top flooring and the laminate, sometimes they get real friendly and can't be separated without leaving little chunks of rubber stuck to the laminate. You can trim it after you put the flooring on it and it won't move but it sure protects your laminate.

  5. #30
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    I have my machine in the "dungon" also. I have wheels on it so I can move it forward and back when I want to work on the back side of the machine. Because of my small space (12' table in a 12' 6" X 10' room) I would not be able to use pantographs if I had carpeting. Just something to keep in mind if you will need to move your machine for any reason.

  6. #31
    Junior Member sandiphi's Avatar
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    The associate did not mention the foam overlayment. Is this kind of like the foam that you put under a carpet? Also, what is the vinyl barrier you mentioned? I am not sure what you mean by that. You also said to put that between my "rubber floor and the laminate". Is that the same thing as the foam and floating floor? Does any of this attach to the floor itself?

    I guess I will have to ask these questions tomorrow when I pick up the flooring. Thanks for the warning and the advice. I hope you can respond to this before I buy the flooring tomorrow.

  7. #32
    Junior Member okie3's Avatar
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    Here's my 2 cents worth, stick on tile doesn't take long to put down, easy to fix if you have another leak. put a large piece of bound carpet where you are going to be working which will make it easy on your feet and back, and you can move it around.
    okie3

  8. #33
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    It's a very thin foam that comes on a roll. It's approximately an 1/8 inch thick and about 36 inches wide. It cushions the floor and separates the flooring from the slab and keeps the concrete from wearing the reverse side of the flooring. Since it is foam it also makes the laminate seem a bit softer to walk on and work on. Carpet pad would not work because it would move way too much and it's too thick. Pergo was the first to use the concept, and that is where the moniker of "a floating floor" came from. Because you glued the tongues of Pergo and never nailed it, you laid the floor on the foam padding and it "floated" above the subfloor or slab.

  9. #34
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cookn
    Have you thought about putting down rubber "jig saw" tiles that interlock ? supposedly they are good under a longarm and frame. They keep down noise and vibration. They are super easy to keep clean, you can damp mop if you want. They're comfortable to walk on, and they also insulate a little. If you do have a water leak, they are easy to take up and dry out. They don't absorb much water. If one gets damaged you can just replace it. They are 2'x2' squares and they cover a large area quickly. The Depot stocks them usually, depending on the size of the store, but if they don't stock them they can special order them. They also stock or can order different colors and designs, you can make a really neat floor. They also have another product designed for garage floors that works on the same principle, that is a harder composition, that is nice. If we didn't already have carpet in the room our longarm and frame is going in, it's the way I would go.
    Several of my friends have these in front of their cutting and ironing stations in their quilt room. They swear it helps with any back strain, especially when doing a LOT of cutting and/or ironing. They've been so thrilled with how much it helps that many of the rest of us are considering getting them as well. Anything to help cut down on back strain is most welcome!


  10. #35
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cookn
    Have you thought about putting down rubber "jig saw" tiles that interlock ? supposedly they are good under a longarm and frame. They keep down noise and vibration. They are super easy to keep clean, you can damp mop if you want. They're comfortable to walk on, and they also insulate a little. If you do have a water leak, they are easy to take up and dry out. They don't absorb much water. If one gets damaged you can just replace it. They are 2'x2' squares and they cover a large area quickly. The Depot stocks them usually, depending on the size of the store, but if they don't stock them they can special order them. They also stock or can order different colors and designs, you can make a really neat floor. They also have another product designed for garage floors that works on the same principle, that is a harder composition, that is nice. If we didn't already have carpet in the room our longarm and frame is going in, it's the way I would go.
    We have these in our exercise room. They were a lot less expensive purchased from an exercise store (I think it was 2nd Wind) than from our local big box home improvement store. They are really easy on the feet/back/legs yet seem able to handle the heavy equipment just fine. They did outgas heavily the first couple of weeks they were in; had to keep the room aired. The only thing that might not work for a sewing area is that the only color (for ours, anyway) was black with speckles in it. This could be dark in a basement. Works for us because we have a lot of South light coming into our exercise room.

    My brother has laminate flooring. It's older, so maybe they have improved on it, but the one thing I don't like about it is that it is so noisy when you walk on it with shoes.

  11. #36
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandiphi
    Thank you everybody that responded to my dilemma. I am going to go to home depot tonight and see what they suggest. I would like to carpet it, but I am not sure how well my cutting table (5 feet long) will move around on the carpet. But then I want tile, because the cutting table would easily move around, and it is pretty easy to lay down. I know I am going to have to do some prep work to the floor because the paint is chipped in some areas. Errr, I wish the guy that we bought the house from prepared this floor the proper way. I wouldn't have this problem right now. But, he wanted a quick way to fix a problem so he could sell the house.

    Anyways, thanks for all the suggestions.
    My sewing room/craft room/ everything room was my girls' bedroom, thus the carpet. I can't wait to rip it out. It's comfortable to walk on, but lint, dropped pins, etc. are a problem. I'm already not a Ms. Clean, so having that carpet out of there would suit me just fine.

  12. #37
    Junior Member sandiphi's Avatar
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    I finished my floor :D What a big difference in there now. I ended up using Traffic Master Allure-Resilient flexible floating floor planks. They were so easy to use and lay down. I also like them because they are waterproof. I did my whole room myself. Took about a total of 24 hours to do myself (my room 480 sq ft, 20x24). It looks just like a real wood floor. Now, I just have to put the rest of the room together. I am still waiting for my cutting table to be built, I have a shelf and book case on order too. Can't wait to get these pieces in so that I can set up my long arm. Woohooo. :mrgreen: Here are a couple of pics, before and after.

    entrance area
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    cement floor with water damage
    Name:  Attachment-30922.jpe
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    sewing machine desks
    Name:  Attachment-30923.jpe
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Size:  44.9 KB

  13. #38
    Cookn's Avatar
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    You did a great job!! I'm just starting on our "Studio" this week. I'll do my least favorite thing over the weekend, painting, shoot me now. Next week I'll start on all the custom cabinets and built ins. We should pick up our longarm next week. It's gonna be great when I get it all tied together.

  14. #39
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    Our basement is also a "dungeon" - but after painting the walls pink, it is less awful.

    We put in commercial grade carpeting about 20 years ago. It was a remnant, and it looks like the stuff that's used in hotel lobbies.

    It has held up awesomely. Cat barf comes out of it easily.

    It has no padding. I'd say the pile is about 1/4 to 3/8 inches high.

    Much nicer to be on than bare concrete. Our floor was poured in sections and is uneven. Carpet is just laid down. It doesn't seem to curl up on the edges.


  15. #40
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    Your new floor looks beautiful!! Great job on getting it installed

  16. #41

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    the problem with carpet in a sewing room is the threads and needles/pins that get stuck in it. You will always be vacuuming. It sounds like the water problem was a fluke occurrence right? I'd personally prefer some type of tile or linoleum and have some nice carpets to throw down or pick up as usage dictates. Or just sand that floor a bit and repaint it or even stain with one of the many concrete products available if it is in good shape already. You can even wax a cement floor, they look pretty cool all shined up don't you think? Yea and some of those newer manufactured laminate floors are nice and easy put in. Some of them cost as much or more than wood but, some people think they are more durable, less likely to scratch. All depends on what you like! I think this would be a warmer option than tile or paint and a lot less up keep than carpet.

    In my little "pool house" home I have decided to go with the Vinyl composition tile like in schools and offices. But they also make it in so many other designer colors; blue, green, orange, purple, etc. and its only about .62 cents per sq. ft. I plan to go with a beige or oatmeal field and create a design with the accent colors blending them from room to room according to the main color in ea. room. You could create a quilt pattern on the sewing room floor. You can cut them with a utility knife no saw needed but the floor needs to be smooth w/o lumps. bumps ar indents because they may crack. They are easier to work with when its warm. Any way you asked for two cents worth of advice and I gave you a nickel :lol:

  17. #42

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    OH ! I just caught your photos. Way to go! The floors look great with the walls :-) VCT Wouldn't have gone very well in that room.

    Now tell us all about that long arm machine you are getting!

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