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Thread: Do you apply Elmers for basting like THIS?

  1. #1
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Do you apply Elmers for basting like THIS?

    There are many of us who still do not have the "picture" of how this glue basting is done.

    Please tell us which, if any, of these ways you apply the glue when you are basting a quilt.
    Also, do you apply the glue to the fabric or the batting? Do you glue the front or the back first?

    Thanks!

    Jan in VA

    That should read SPREAD not pread in C!
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    Jan in VA
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  2. #2
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I've basted with waves (A) but I've also done it in grid form but I think
    I prefer the grid form because I know where I'm going. I prefer to
    put the batting down first, apply the glue on the batting then apply the
    fabric to it. Please start with a small project or even just scraps just
    to get a feel. I wasn't happy the first time but I'm glad I didn't ruin
    anything. On large quilts I use binder clips to anchor everything down
    just like you would with other basting methods. Start in the middle
    and work your way out row by row. I also prefer to thin the glue about
    1:3 and use a paint brush and use the iron to set it. Hope this helps.
    as I go.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Is that 1 part water to 3 parts glue?

  4. #4
    Junior Member sandyquilts's Avatar
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    I think you would do better to use quilt spray like June Taylor brand.
    I use Elmer's glue only for binding and small projects as seen here http://sandyquilts.blogspot.com/2008...nd-quilts.html
    Sandy
    http://sandyquilts.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I spray baste. I never could get the hang of using glue for the binding. used way too much!

  6. #6
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    Thank you, Jan, for starting this thread! I've seen many methods and techniques for sandwiching, all of which are successful. While I've used one particular method with success, as a beginner it's great to know that there are other methods that will get me to my ultimate destination. Different methods work for each individual, and- like cars- any of them will get you from Point A to Point B, but there's a style that fits everyone.
    I've wondered about the specifics of applying the glue when using this method, and will be following this thread; thanks again!

  7. #7
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I think someone posted a tutorial about this if you do a search.

  8. #8
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    I have arthritis and found this item to help me with glue basting. Works terrifically!!!

    Here is a useful item. I am not affiliated with Lee Valley. My DH was ordering from their catalog so when I saw this I knew I could put it to good use in glue basting. This is very inexpensive and one of hte 3 different sizes of tips will work for you... I am sure.
    http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/pag...at=1,110,42967

    I completely agree with EasyPeezy on post #2 about starting out with a small project or scraps. It is easy and you will get the hang of it. Try not to be afraid of it since it is washable and will all come out. Even on your iron.

    PS: sorry Jan, I almost forgot to answer your question. I have used all of the photos you have shown. Not sure which I like the best. They all work and if you get tooo much, you can always swipe it off with your finger.
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    Last edited by SewExtremeSeams; 03-31-2013 at 12:32 PM.

    Linda

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  9. #9
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Is that 1 part water to 3 parts glue?
    Sorry, I should have said 1 part glue to 3 parts water. You have to
    play with it. I go by feel and thinned it until it looks like whole milk.
    My glue might have been a bit thicker because it was a few
    years old. If you use fresh glue you may not have to thin in as
    much.

  10. #10
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    I have 3 of those bottles! left from refilling my printer's ink cartridge!! I KNEW i'd find a use for them someday. I guess I am almost a hoarder.

  11. #11
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
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    I generally put the glue on like you did in picture A.

  12. #12
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    Oh yes, I forgot to mention that I keep a damp towel near me. That way I don't have
    to go to the sink every time. I just wipe my hands when I get glue on them. Saves time.

    And if you ever get a fold under (I had a really bad crease the other day) I sprayed that
    part with water up to the closest edge (til soaking wet), lift gently and reposition.
    You don't even have to add more glue. Use a dry towel to absorb the excess water.
    Press with a pressing cloth until dry. Voila. Of course you can avoid creases if you secure
    your batting with clips or painters tape but I was trying to be a smart... and paid for it. LOL

  13. #13
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    In this topic I really hoped there would be "gluers" who would share their particular methods of applying the glue, rather than alternatives to using glue. We know those. We want details on gluing! Thanks to those who are giving them to us.

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    Bastinga quilt with Elmer’s School Glue

    Two most important things to remember:
    - glue MUST be Elmer’s School Glue (because it is washable)
    - glue must be 100% dry beforeyou start quilting

    Lay your backing on the table and straighten.
    Lay your batting on the backing and straighten.
    Lay your quilt top on the batting.

    If the quilt is too large to fit on the table, center it as much as possible. Find which way you have the least amount of hanging over the table. I usually put the width of my quilt to be the lengthof my table (60”).
    Using safety pins, pin your quilt through the middle of the quilt widthwise, separating the quilt into two halves. Roll the top on one half as far as it will go – to the safety pins. At this point you may want to move the roll of the quilt all the way to the edge of the table leaving a large area of batting exposed to give yourself more working area. Use chairs or lowered ironing board to support the weight of the hanging part ofthe quilt.
    Apply Elmer’s School Glue I thin lines, or dots, or drizzles on the bating in the width of 12”-18”. I make a grid with lines about 2”-3” apart. Fold the top over the glue (12”-18”) and straighten with your hands from the middle outwards. Keep doing this until you reach the top edge of the quilt. At this point, the glue has not set yet. Straighten yourtop with your hands, removing any possible imperfections. Dry by pressing with dry iron. Some people do not do this, but rather leave it to dry overnight, but I am the impatient kind and I use my iron.
    Repeat the same procedure with the other half of the quilt. Once it is COMPLETELY dry, turn the quilt sandwich so the backing is facing up. Straighten your backing again. And repeat the same procedure as with the quilt top. Quilt as desired.
    Hint: If you will be applying your binding by hand, go easy on the glue at the quilt edges. Although it does not bother the machine needle one bit, it can be tough to get the hand sewing needle through it. I just use a metal thimble, since I cannot seam to go easy on the glue.
    Basting your quilt this way, will make sure that both your top and your backing are as straight as you can get them to be. I found that batting that has good consistency, such as W&N, works great. I hope this helps. Happy Quilting!
    Last edited by Tashana; 03-31-2013 at 01:03 PM.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    I have just posted my gluing method. I also sent you the same in PM. However, when I cut and pasted in the PM something happened and all many words got mushed together. Odd. Sorry about that.
    I've got a smile on my face, I've got four walls around me
    The sun in the sky, the water surrounds me
    I'll win now but sometimes I'll lose
    I've been battered, but I'll never bruise

  16. #16
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
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    Jan.... To answer your question, my glue basting mostly looks like your picture "D".
    Sue

  17. #17
    Senior Member Earleen's Avatar
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    I use A and B. They both work well for me.
    Earleen The best helping hand is at the end of your arm.

  18. #18
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    I generally do something similar to diagram A, making sure that I get coverage no more than about 3 inches or so apart and that the sides are done to about 1 - 2 inches from the edges. I sort of drag the tip of the glue bottle along the fabric or batting while gently squeezing the bottle. It actually probably looks like a combination of diagrams A and D as sometimes it skips a little here and there.

    I also thin my glue a bit. Can't really tell amount of water to glue as I just put some water in until it looks right. LOL I like to glue to be able to run easily, not make large globs, but still stays on top of the fabric and not be so thin that it soaks through like water.

    Some of what I just wrote sounds a little vague, but it is a trial and error sort of thing to some degree. I hope I have helped you anyway!

  19. #19
    Super Member Lilrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandyquilts View Post
    I think you would do better to use quilt spray like June Taylor brand.
    I use Elmer's glue only for binding and small projects as seen here http://sandyquilts.blogspot.com/2008...nd-quilts.html
    Unfortunately some of us with asthma have trouble with sprays, so the glue may be a better choice.

  20. #20
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    I spread the glue onto the batting in thin lines about 3" apart....nothing exact about this process....I don't spread the glue, just patting down the top fabric spreads it enough....this is way easier than any other method of basting that I have found....I don't iron dry as I am spreading out the quilt on my pool table, just air dry....but ironing is alot faster!....If I have a blob of glue, just spread it out a bit with your finger....it's a very cheap method, no fumes, no overspray and any cleanup is done with a damp rag....I have done several this times and love it....try it on a small practice sandwich if you have doubts.....you will find that since spreading onto the batting, you won't have any wrinkles or puckers....no shifting of fabrics....and the glue will last until you wash the quilt....repositioning after drying can be done by dampening the fabric/glue until softened.....it's just starch and will wash out entirely without staining.....unless someone comes up with a better method, it's glue for me for all basting!

  21. #21
    Super Member DonnaC's Avatar
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    Tashana, are you watering down the glue as some others have suggested, or using it right from the bottle? (I too have been trying to get a good mental picture of this method!)

  22. #22
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    Basting with glue? I've never heard of this method before. Thank you for asking Jan! I'll watch this thread for answers
    Bernina 640, Singer 201-3, Singer Centennial 15-91, Tin Lizzie 26" long arm

  23. #23
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
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    Tashana explains it very well. I have only made place mats so far, but did something that looked rather like "A" Ironed it dry. Not a wrinkle or bubble! I have a full size top that I will try it on next. I expect it to work out just fine! Good luck! BTW Jan, I have wondered how the quilt turned out that you posted a photo of, that I believe was a round robin type? It had a strange round that you needed to work around. If you have posted photos sense, I missed it. Story of my life!!!

  24. #24
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    I mark the center of the top and bottom edge of my quilt top and my backing fabric with a safety pin so I know where the center is when I go to put on the backing. Then I apply the glue right to the back of the quilt top often at every seam or matching point. Just a dot. I do about a foot down all across the quilt then press it down onto the batting. Then fold over a bit more, dot the glue and press into the batting until the whole front is adhered. Then I flip the top and backing over, match up my pins and then apply the glue to the by either drizzling it on, or with dots in a grid, smooth it out and then leave it overnight or iron it dry. I don't clamp anything down or tape any thing. If it a big quilt I will roll the top and bottom on board but opposite to the way is supposed to go so the back of the quilt top faces up instead of down.

  25. #25
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    I use 'A'. I have had excellent results with this method. I always have difficulty with basting spray because it gets everywhere!!!

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