Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 37

Thread: Do you know what OFLA means?

  1. #1
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,663

    Do you know what OFLA means?

    Raise your hand if you learned to quilt by cutting out all the pieces with scissors and templates. Wow. You’ve been quilting a long time. In fact, chances are good you started quilting before 1979, when Mr. Yoshio Okada, founder of the Olfa Company, introduced the fabric rotary cutter to the marketplace. The Japanese company had been making snap-off blades for other uses (the name Olfa comes from two Japanese words that mean “break the blade”) when Mr. Okada had the idea to develop a rolling cutter. It’s not an exaggeration to say his invention revolutionized quiltmaking, and by the early ’80s, rotary cutters were being adopted by quilters everywhere.

    I'm glad I've only "broke the blade" once. It was surprising and scary though!
    :-)
    CAS

  2. #2
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Knot Merrill, Southern Indiana
    Posts
    5,713
    Thanks! Olfa always sounded so Scandinavian to me
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  3. #3
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,663
    I won an Olfa contest by coming up with a little poem. I think I posted how excited I was to actually win something!
    btw Olfa DOES sound Scandinavian!
    :-)
    CAS

  4. #4
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,916
    Blog Entries
    1
    I did a presentation for my Microcomputers class about 1 1/2 yrs ago. Our topic had to be how technology has improved an aspect of our own life. I did it on all of the technology that has been invented to make quilting easier, quicker and more accurate. I learned (as well as my classmates!) a lot about the Olfa company. Mr. Okada had been watching beautiful silks being cut with scissors and he didn't like how the fabric was being butchered. He wanted it to have nice clean cut lines - thus the creation of the rotary cutter!!!
    No one has ever become poor by giving. - Anne Frank
    Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    http://www.etsy.com/shop/TheQuiltedPig

  5. #5
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,663
    Wow, that is great, thank you Mr. Okada! I bet your presentation was great too!
    :-)
    CAS

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Philly
    Posts
    113
    Thanks for sharing. I learned something new today!

  7. #7
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Fox Valley Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,937
    I can raise my hand that I learned how to quilt with templates and scissors back in the 70's...and remember when I got my first olfa cutter...and how it sat in a drawer for a long time because I was PETRIFIED to use it...no one else I knew had one...I finally did get the courage to give it a try...and then wondered why it took me so long. It totally revolutionized the quilting world!

    Didn't know the history of the cutter though before today, so thanks for sharing that with us!!

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,263
    Thanks for sharing!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Dillsburg, PA
    Posts
    315
    I happened into quilting by chance in 1999. I knew nothing about rotary cutters. As a scrapbooker I had fancy cut scissors and a circle punch. But never even heard of a rotary cutter. So...my first time cutting fabric was using large scissors and I thought...OMG...what a pain this is. Of course that quilt top still isn't complete due to my mother living us and she was dying of cancer at the time. So...I stuffed everything in a bag where it still is today. Anyway......

    I went to JoAnn Fabric for something else and happened to see all of the quilting supplies. I bought a cutter but no spare blades...LOL. Also bought a large quilting ruler. Now I own 4 rotary cutters and at least 4 different sized rulers.

    Things sure have changed even in 13 years.

  10. #10
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    I too started before the Rotary Cutter.... It changed everything ... including having special stores just for quilt fabric and supplies.
    It is no wonder half cut quilts are frequently found at estate sales. I have even seen lots and lots of boxes of squares in various sizes that just never made it into a top or block .. the cardboard template still with the squares.

  11. #11
    Senior Member sew_southern's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    871
    I started around 1990 with a friend showing me how to trace around a 4 inch square cardboard piece, we were both about 20. After making about a zillion traced squares, I then got to cut out each one. The only kind of quilt she knew how to piece was the 9 patch (looked like a checker board), we pieced and quilted several of those for her young children and my unborn baby. The elder women in her family apparently did all the piecing, but all the females helped with the quilting. I made clothes for about 10 years after that and started learning to quilt again in 2000. I was really impressed by all the quilt notions at that time, and now there's even more things to play/work with!
    ...the importance of one's life lies not in money or celebrity, but in doing the right thing, even in silence or secrecy, and without reward... Fergus M. Bordewich

  12. #12
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    9,194
    my Japanese husband loves this story ;-)

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    729
    some things i still cut by hand but i own several roratry cutters and lots of acrylic templates for quilting

  14. #14
    Super Member 117becca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    dayton OH
    Posts
    1,878
    Those women back in the day did know how to cut precise pieces!!! I made a star quilt for my mom out of a ton of diamond pieces that my grandmother cut out before she died in 1945. I thought I'd have to square them up - but didn't have to do that to any of the pieces!! They were perfecto!!!
    my name is becca and i'm a quilt-a-holic :-)

  15. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,526
    Wow! I've always thought it was an anacronym for something. Thanks for sharing that interesting fact!

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    836
    wow, Becca, what a priceless quilt you made with those pieces your grandmother cut. I bet it felt good just to handle them.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    nevada
    Posts
    795
    Blog Entries
    1
    learnt something new today.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Normal, IL
    Posts
    561
    I also learned to quilt by making cardboard templates, tracing the on cloth, cutting out with scissors and hand stitching the pieces together. We did about five different blocks. Never again!

  19. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,115
    I too thought scandanavian.......hmm,.....kudos to him!!!!!!I started quilting when the rotary cutter was the way to do it...I really wonder if I would have attempted it with cardboard and scissors..........

  20. #20
    Super Member Mazda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Posts
    1,025
    interesting
    Mazda

  21. #21
    Senior Member star619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Shreveport, LA
    Posts
    855
    Blog Entries
    7
    I have been quilting since 1982, and am well acquainted with the "trace the plastic template method". When I first got my rotary cutter, I was so excited that I didn't read all of the instructions carefully. And IT WORKED! I was so impressed with speed and accuracy that when I saw a red streak on my all white fabric, I couldn't figure out where it came from... Yep, I had sliced of the tip of my left forefinger, and never felt a thing. I was impressed again! LOL!

  22. #22
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    2,663
    Well Star, that is one way to learn just how sharp those darn blades are!

    Quote Originally Posted by star619 View Post
    I have been quilting since 1982, and am well acquainted with the "trace the plastic template method". When I first got my rotary cutter, I was so excited that I didn't read all of the instructions carefully. And IT WORKED! I was so impressed with speed and accuracy that when I saw a red streak on my all white fabric, I couldn't figure out where it came from... Yep, I had sliced of the tip of my left forefinger, and never felt a thing. I was impressed again! LOL!
    :-)
    CAS

  23. #23
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    6,548
    Thanks for the information on Mr. Okada and Olfa. I always like knowing "the rest of the story"!

  24. #24
    Super Member Annie68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,289
    Yes, add me to the "been around a long time" list. I think the OLFA rotary was the first new quilting invention that peaked my interest when it went on the market. What a time saver! Interesting info.

  25. #25
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    So Plymouth, NY
    Posts
    2,327
    I too started before the rotary cutter. Learned to make templates from cereal box card board. Traced around wrong side of fabric with a pencil, cutting out each one and leaving 1/4" allowance by the pencil mark. Odd that I never got carpal tunnel then but I sure have now....

    Just goes to show you, know matter how long you've been quilting or living, you can learn something everyday from QB. I'm 50% Norwegian and was certain that OLFA was a Scandinavian Company too. "Ya"....I too was so wrong!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.