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Thread: Do you own a serger? Is it necessary to own one?

  1. #26
    Senior Member pam1966's Avatar
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    I got one about ten years ago. I don't even know where it is right now. So that tells you how much I use it.

  2. #27
    Super Member mar32428's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craftybear
    you don't need a serger to quilt
    No, you don't need a serger to quilt. I think it makes the seams too bulky. However, that said, there are certain fabrics that scream for a serger because of raveling.

    I've had one for years (updated a couple of times) and couldn't live without it for sewing my clothes and for others. It's like my embroidery machines. I don't NEED them but would be miserable without them.

  3. #28
    Super Member mountain deb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I have one and never use it, the threads keep breaking and I have finally given up on it. Probably has about 30 minutes of sewing on it.
    I have learned the hard way (about when I was ready to pitch mine) that if the directions say to thread 'a' first then 'b', to do it in that sequence. Otherwise you will continue to break the thread. There could be other reasons, but that is usually mine.
    I have a Husky 936 and love it---now.

  4. #29
    Super Member Quilt Mom's Avatar
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    Yes, I own a serger. No, it is not a necessity. I don't use it for quilting, in general.

  5. #30
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
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    I got one with my Brother when I bought it. I don't use it quilting nor do I finish off my edges before I wash(I just cut with the zigzag rotary cutter) I do however use it a lot for making crate pads and cage covers for the humane society. Makes everything go so much faster.

  6. #31
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    I had a serger but always had trouble threading it so I sold it. You definitely don't need one to be a quilter.

  7. #32
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam
    I have one and never use it, the threads keep breaking and I have finally given up on it. Probably has about 30 minutes of sewing on it.
    I also had the thread breaking problem and I was ready to throw the darn thing out, but my DH said let's take it back to the store where we bought it, and they looked at it and said the pressure was too high and they fixed it and now it works great, but I still hate threading it. I do use it for finishing raw edges--not on quilts, but I'm planning to make the 6 hour serger quilt as soon as the pattern I ordered arrives.

  8. #33
    Senior Member sewjean's Avatar
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    I have a serger and love it. I don't use it for quilt making but I'm sure you could. Clothes making or placemats, tote/purses a lot of things that you want a finished seam. I also like to shorten T-shirts with it. Like a sewing machine you can do many thinngs with it. I'm not sure we need half of the 'things' we have but, we love them anyway!

  9. #34
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    I own a serger and I love what little I have done with it. I am challenged with the threading, but have taken it to quilting classes and am learning the advantages. I used it to sew on the binding of placemats, and it looks so professional. I whipped up a great pillowcase with ease. Of course that it is class with a teacher. I need to learn to thread it without help. I think I will try the tying off the thread so I don't have to keep threading it.

    I have talked to a few women that say they only use their serger to sew quilt tops, and use the sewing machine for things the serger can't do.

    I like the idea of serging the edges when you wash fabric.

  10. #35
    Super Member grammyj's Avatar
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    I have 3 sergers , but I use them a lot in my sewing shop for alterations, keep one w/white one black and use one for colors. Couldn't do without them, but not necessary for quilting.

  11. #36
    Junior Member jemcnutt's Avatar
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    I have a 20 year old, 4-thread White Serger. I don't use it all the time, but find it very useful for bib cloths, receiving blankets, cool wraps for your neck, and especially pillowcases. I serge long strips for sub-cuts - it's great for the rail fence pattern. While not a necessity, mine is a real workhorse and makes a really sturdy quilt for my lovely grandchildren!

  12. #37
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    I have a serger & I do not use it for quilting. I don't have enough control of it to keep a consistant 1/4" seam. There are many times I wonder why I even bought it, however, I am finding that I like it when I do pillowcases. That said, my sister has one & does beautiful work with it, but again does not use it for quilting.

  13. #38
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    I have three sergers and I love to sew with them. I keep different color thread on each one. I took a class at the local Sew & Vac Center and learned how to thread the sergers easier. I bought a Singer first, then bought a Janome when my mother bought one and it was more user friendly(I thought) than my Singer. Turns out it was just the operator. Now, I have three to use because after my Father passed away, I moved in with my Mother. I have made the quilts I made for Christmas with the sergers. I was worried about the stitching coming out on the regular machies. But, I think I might go back to my regular Singers to do some more quilts. Sergers are not necessary, but very handy to have around, in my opinion.

  14. #39
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    My comment on Threading a serger pretty much answers this question. I found after purchasing my serger that I could easily live without my "have to have." It's handy if you sew kids' clothes, edging fabrics that easily ravel, quick napkins, etc.

  15. #40
    starlight's Avatar
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    I have a serger and use it all the time for clothing. I did make a serger quilt once. It was all done on the serger except for the binding. I might even get around to making another one someday. A serger is not necessary for quilting.

  16. #41
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    A serger is not a necessity for a quilter. I have had one for about 20 plus years and love it. It can be a bi--- to thread, I have learned to cut the threads for the upper and lower loopers and tie my new thread on and sew till it comes thru. Saves alot of time and aggravation. I have made quilts with it, if the tension is set correctly, the seam will be as stong as a sewing machine stitch. They do have one that threads itself, rather expensive. I think the people that did not like their sergers may have given up to soon, it does take a while to get to know the machine.

  17. #42
    Senior Member QuiltNama's Avatar
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    I have a serger and no, it is not a must have for quilting. I use mine to serge the edges of my fabric before I wash them, otherwise I use it for clothing construction.

  18. #43
    Super Member Quilter2B's Avatar
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    I have one that is about 12 years old; never used it for quilting but it is indispensable IMHO for making clothes, home decor, accessories, wouldn't be without it for finishing seams but tight curves are a b**ch. It is not a must have for quilting; in fact I don't think I would trust myself to use it for quilting, not enough accuracy for 1/4" seams.

  19. #44
    Super Member Jackie R's Avatar
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    I have a Baby Lock serger and use it off and on to finish edges on clothing I make on my regular sewing machine (limited to my adorable 2 1/2 yr old grandson right now) and for making quilt-as-you-go quilts. Mostly the size of a throw. They're fun and convenient for some things but not necessary for regular quilting. I mostly use the regular sewing machine for quilting.

  20. #45
    Merrilin's Avatar
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    I have a serger and my 29 yr. old uses it to do the crazy quilt top we make. He really loves it for that. He just lets his mind wander when putting the blocks together.
    But I like useing it to do the finished top to keep it from fraying.

  21. #46
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    I have a serger and very rarely us it. Not a necessity for quilting

  22. #47
    Super Member Sheila Elaine's Avatar
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    I have a Small Home Based Sewing Business & my Serger comes in handy for finishing raw edges or anything I want to sew to make it look better. If you want to sell your quilted or sewn clothes they will be worth more to customers if they see the Serged seams. Also, besides looking better overall the sewn item(s) will last much longer if they are sewed on the sewing machine, then Serged.

    Last week, I wanted to make a beach bag for my DGDs Graduation quickly, so I Serged the 1 & 1/2 inch strips together in rows instead of sewing them on the sewing machine & pressed them in one direction. I then FMQ'd the fabric to Insul-Brite (makes items insulated, i.e. Suntan oil or food) & the lining, Serged the inside seams (then went back over them on the sewing machine) & I had finished, except for turning it inside out, & adding the handles.

  23. #48
    Sewaddicted's Avatar
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    I noticed some of you making reference to serging fabric prior to washing.
    Whenever I was fabric, I put a small slit with the scissors in each corner and have no problem with raveling.
    Try it and let me know how it works for you.

  24. #49
    Sewaddicted's Avatar
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    Sorry, but it is not was fabric, but WASH LOL on me.

  25. #50
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    The only quilting I've ever done on the serger is with Kaye Wood's 6-hour quilt. And I love it for that.

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