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Thread: Do you stabilize when hand embroidering?

  1. #1
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    I see stabilizer is used when machine embroidering, can you use some kind of stabilizer in hand embroidery? And still get the needle through?

  2. #2
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    there are a lot of soft stabilizers, I've never used one for hand work but I'm sure you could.

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Maybe some of the wash away stabilizers? :D:D:D

  4. #4
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    Never. When you first start you should use a hoop or scroll frame and that stabilizes the fabric. I have embroidered for years and now I can do without the frame. I just hold it in my hand, but embroidery fabric tends to be a little more stiff than regular fabric, so that is already enough stability.

  5. #5
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I embroider a lot and never use anything.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by judylg
    I see stabilizer is used when machine embroidering, can you use some kind of stabilizer in hand embroidery? And still get the needle through?
    I didn't used to then someone suggested I did for heavy sewing as I do not use a hoop, I just use what we here call muslin, it is not the same as yours, Which we call calico, this is a very fine fairly open weave, sorry I do not know what it is called over there.

  7. #7
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    One of the gals at work just tried the wash-away stabilizer and she said it was really hard to get the needle through. I have seen where someone doubled the muslin and it seemed to work. Another girl embroiders through the batting - that definitely keeps the threads from showing through.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by loopywren
    Quote Originally Posted by judylg
    I see stabilizer is used when machine embroidering, can you use some kind of stabilizer in hand embroidery? And still get the needle through?
    I didn't used to then someone suggested I did for heavy sewing as I do not use a hoop, I just use what we here call muslin, it is not the same as yours, Which we call calico, this is a very fine fairly open weave, sorry I do not know what it is called over there.
    forgot to mention that I leave the muslin in, it helps to stabilise for framing or quilting. Any fine cotton or lawn fabric should work.

  9. #9
    Super Member kwiltkrazy's Avatar
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    I don't stabilize my hand embroidery.

  10. #10
    Super Member heather1949's Avatar
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    I do stabilize all my hand embroidery.

  11. #11
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    i use a layer of light weight muslin behind my hand embroidery projects. that keeps any traveling threads from showing through and everything on the front looking sharp and nice.

  12. #12
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    Never thought of using a stabilizer for hand embroidery. Wouldn't the weight of the fabric being embroidered make a difference as to whether you would need to stabilize?

  13. #13

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    Does anyone use batting behind their embroidery so they don't need to use a hoop? If so, what kind.

  14. #14
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    i generally use a square of muslin behind my hand embroideries- it keeps the threads from showing through - and is easy to stitch through. does make the squares a little heavier...but that's never been a problem for me

  15. #15
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    Why would you need to if it's in the hoop?

  16. #16
    Super Member dreamboat's Avatar
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    I don't use stabilizer. I just use a hoop.

  17. #17
    Senior Member YukonViv's Avatar
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    I use a backing of some sort, depending on the fabric...if it's duponi silk I use a stabilizer, if it's cottons I use a lightweight muslin.

    I don't use it to hold the fabric, I use it for keeping the thread from showing through to the front.

  18. #18
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    No...it would make it too thick to lay nicely and it doesn't need any stabilizing if you put it in a hoop.

  19. #19
    Super Member Greenheron's Avatar
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    I usually embroider on linen or cotton without any backing but embroidery experts who use very fine fabrics or are doing stumpwork or other, heavier projects use a muslin or maybe lawn backing. When working with small pieces, basting the fabric to be embroidered to a larger piece that can then be mounted on a frame or in a hoop is advisable. Great Britain and Australia have a wonderful heritage of skillful, artistic embroiderers and great publications.

    Embroidery should be worked so that there isn't loose, floating or carried-over thread, yarn or floss so that the back of the project is as tidy as the front. Knots on the back are no more acceptable than knots on the surface of a quilt.

  20. #20
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    I have just purchased the "sticky fabri-solvy"by Sulky and I find it VERY difficult to embroider through. I'm quite disappointed in it. It's used in a printer. The only thing it's good for is saving your pattern. Because you just put your pattern in the copier.

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