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Thread: Does anyone here quilt Queens and Kings on their little machines?

  1. #26
    Super Member karenpatrick's Avatar
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    I was considering doing the king size D9P this way and this thread may have given me the courage to give it a try. I have already sewn my blocks together in rows so I could quilt each row as I go. But I plan on putting a small maybe 3 or 4 inches border on. When do you think that should be added? Thanks for the help.

  2. #27
    Junior Member Suzette316's Avatar
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    I have done a few queen quilts on my home machine and it was a bit of a challenge, but very doable. I wouldn't hesitate to do it again. But here are two sites to check out. The first is Diane Gaudynski's site. She is a master quilter who does all her award winning (and stunningly beautiful) work on her domestic machine. She gives lots of tips, hints and suggestions for getting great results. The second site is Leah Day's site. She mostly does smaller quilts, but she also has great ideas for quilting on a domestic machine.

    http://dianegaudynski.blogspot.com/

    http://www.freemotionquilting.blogspot.com/

  3. #28
    QM
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    Power Poster QM's Avatar
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    I have done a great many, (at least 100) but can't anymore due to shoulder and back arthritis. I expect to get friends to LA for me or use QAG in the future. The trick with doing these on a home machine is to pin baste well, then just do one little piece at a time before going to the next.

  4. #29
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gayle8675309 View Post
    Getting my quilts long arm quilted is getting too dang expensive. I'm debating whether to try to quilt my queen sized quilt on my small janome machine. The largest I've done so far is a twin. It turned out pretty good...not error free, but for the most part it turned out acceptable.

    So do any of you quilt your large quilts at home on your small machines? I need to hear that it can be done. I'm really nervous to start a large quilt.

    Gayle
    I quilt on my Singer 500 Name:  DSCN7960.JPG
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Size:  348.6 KB husband made the leaf for my dinning room table.
    Freedom is costly and quilting keeps us busy...

  5. #30
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    Dunster,
    If you don't mind me asking, what brand is your longarm, and what price range can one usually expect to pay for one?
    How much space does your take up? Thank you so much for your answers.

  6. #31
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    Hey Grace MooreLinker -- how clever is that! But wait a minute . . . where do you stand? Where is the foot pedal? Please give some specifics.

  7. #32
    Senior Member sept97's Avatar
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    I have no interest in a longarm (it just looks way too confusing) but I would love the sweet 16. I have done large quilts on my janome machine. I don't pin it either. My best friend is spray basting and I either roll the quilt up to fit or just squish it. I also have a janome 350e embroidery machine that I've used to quilt with and that works out fine also. Good luck

  8. #33
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    suziequilter

    Quote Originally Posted by Gayle8675309 View Post
    Getting my quilts long arm quilted is getting too dang expensive. I'm debating whether to try to quilt my queen sized quilt on my small janome machine. The largest I've done so far is a twin. It turned out pretty good...not error free, but for the most part it turned out acceptable.

    So do any of you quilt your large quilts at home on your small machines? I need to hear that it can be done. I'm really nervous to start a large quilt.

    Gayle
    One thing that I find is very helpfull is to place tables all around my quilting table so the quilt stays up on them all at one level. When the quilt fall over the edge is when it pulls and the tension gets off. I have been quilting my quilts this way on a home machine for many years. I'm getting pretty good at it if I don't say so myself.

  9. #34
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    I've done 2 king size and several queen size on a dsm with 6.5" harp. The hardest part is managing the bulk between me and the needle. It's best to start in the middle and work out. SID works the best for me, and I often use one of the decorative stitches rather than a straight stitch. When doing SID I like to roll both ends toward the middle and hold with rings, then start stitching in the center, unroll as I go. A tight roll will help get the bulk through the harp.
    Shirley in Arizona

  10. #35
    Member reneaunoel's Avatar
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    I've been using an old door for a base! Now I DO want a dining room table. NEVER did I think of creating a "sewing" leaf. Keeper Husband, for sure! I have a 48" Flynn frame, but that means my "giant" quilt making is done in sections. This idea means it could be done in one go, just have to PLAN where I'm going. Thank you all for the ideas.

    Oh, I have a "normal" size computerized Kenmore (Janome in all but name) AND an 11" throat HV Sapphire 835. More throat space is nice, but it took me a year of working with it, before it's all coming together. I used the normal for Twin, Baby and Lap quilts, mainly, because that was my only option besides the floor and tying the quilt!

  11. #36
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    I've done many queen sized quilts and I've also done 6 or more king sized quilts on my Janome 4000. It can be a struggle, but working from the center out helped me. The very, very first quilt that I machine quilted, I did a king size basket quilt where the basket blocks were set on point with sashing in between. I was a very, very new quilter then, and since no one had told me I couldn't do it, I did it. On the first quilt, I did SID on the sashing, then SID on the basket blocks. I might never do another king size basket quilt again, I learned so much, plus it went on our bed, so no one saw it, and I had made it larger 110 x 110 so that I got some of the quilt at night - you know - one good turn deserves all the covers. It can be done, but be patient and take your time, you can do it.The class on Big quilts on small machines from Craftsy might be a good idea for me to sign up for, even an old quilter can learn new tricks.

  12. #37
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    Sounds like that Craftsy class would really benefit you AND me, LOL ... I stay away from large quilts like that cuz I also don't want to have to pay to have it quilted and I don't like doing them myself either. The few larger quilts I've quilted on my Janome6500 make me so hot and maneuvering them is no fun
    Warm quilt hugs, Sue in CA
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  13. #38
    Super Member wraez's Avatar
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    side note ... I have a very large sewing table 4ft x 8ft, and yes that helps, no drag etc but I still don't like quilting on my machine, LOL
    Warm quilt hugs, Sue in CA
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PostCardMailArt

    Life is a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death....Rosalind Russell

  14. #39
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    I tried and it was a mess. I worked and worked and is was NO FUN AT ALL. It turned quilting from a fun hobby into real work. I' d quilted for a quite awhile, not hand quilting (I don't do hand work) and then wanted to save money so gave it a try. To me it's not worth it for a large quilt, You might have more patience then I do and best of luck. But to me the LAQ is worth it. And I give all my quilts away.

  15. #40
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    Yes, I have quilted several q quilts on my Singer 401A slant needle. The prep work takes time, but it certainly can be done. I use an ironing board with a piece of plywood in front of my machine cabinet and an ironing board with a piece of plywood to my left to catch the bulk of the quilt moving that way. Make sure the ironing boards are level with the top of your cabinet. Take your time and smooth out the area in front of where you are going to quilt. Start in the middle and work out. Keep trying and you will get it right. I trace coloring book pictures on the quilts for kids and quilt them into the body of the quilt.

  16. #41
    Super Member charsuewilson's Avatar
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    I've done both king and queen, mostly with stitch in the ditch. I'm looking for methods to do smaller portions. I've looked at Cotton Theory quilting, and some others, but haven't quite figured them out yet.

  17. #42
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    Oh yes, I wouldn't think of sending them out !! Have done three king size (120 x 110) and 115 x 110 and 115 x 110, also several queen size. I purchased two 2 x 4 ft adjustable height tables to set up next to my machine for support. They work great and I move them wherever I need them. Am getting into more complicated patterns now (via Leah Day) and again, - wouldn't even think of sending a quilt out.....Good luck, and most importantly: Have Fun!!

  18. #43
    Junior Member sewnut's Avatar
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    I quilt big quilts on my small home machine because I can't afford a laq, I start in the middle and do one quarter at a time. and move around the inner portion of the quilt, then do the borders last. I pin every 3 to 4 inches tho to hold it together better as I haven't figured out in my old head how glue basting could work and keep holding together.

  19. #44
    Super Member Lucy90's Avatar
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    I do it all the time. I have done both queen & king on my little machine. I want to some day get the Pfaff that has a longer throat. It is hard at times and it takes some manuvering but it can be done

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    My next big quilt I do, I will the 2 halves and then join them. I will quilt both halves leaving 2 inches unquilted down the center on both halves. I will then join the 2 top sections down the middle by machine. I with trim the batting to meet down the center of the quilt and iron on batting join tape. I will then iron one side of the back fabric over the join and overlap the second piece of the back. I will pin it and ladder stitch the back seam. If everything looks perfect, I will quilt the last 4 inch section down the center of the quilt.


    what is batting join tape?

  21. #46
    Super Member MartiMorga's Avatar
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    I am not an experienced quilter, but I have taken classes to learn piecing, etc. All the classes have been QAYG! The quilts are much heavier than a normal quilt and there are a lot of "extra" steps. Not as easy as they would like you to believe. I, of course, being nieve, thought I could make queens for my beds. Well, one is almost done and I think I have unsewn more than I've sewn. The weight is very difficult when connecting rows to rows, etc. I suggest QAYG for bed runners, table runners, small lap quilts, but not anything of substance.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyquiltmom View Post
    I've done a queen size on my vintage Bernina 830 Record, all in one piece, too. Didn't have any trouble with it, but it did take several days.
    I did one this fall on my 830. But it wasn't easy--and I was exhausted from folding, rolling and turning. I did SID--maybe if I had done FM it would have been easier.

  23. #48
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    I am FMQ on a 100x100 on my Brothers1500s. I do a section at a time and it is not easy buy I can not afford to send my quilts to a LAQ. Also I s0pray baste my quilts instead of pinning. That makes it lighter and easier to "push" thru the throat. Pinning your quilt really adds to the weight of the quilt and makes it harder to "push" thru the opening.

  24. #49
    Senior Member quiltingnd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigsister63 View Post
    I am FMQ on a 100x100 on my Brothers1500s. I do a section at a time and it is not easy buy I can not afford to send my quilts to a LAQ. Also I s0pray baste my quilts instead of pinning. That makes it lighter and easier to "push" thru the throat. Pinning your quilt really adds to the weight of the quilt and makes it harder to "push" thru the opening.
    I have spray basted my last two quilts. Both ended up with puckers in the backing fabric. How do you keep that from happening when using the basting spray. I assumed they were there because I moved the quilt around too much.

  25. #50
    Senior Member Pepita's Avatar
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    My last quilt that I quilted was a queen/king. I dreaded it, but I put it in my dining room on the table. because I could support the weight of the quilt by arranging it behind and to the left side, it wasn't really a problem. I also did something a bit different this time, I drew out the blocks and came up with quilting motifs for each different block, and border. I think, and my family thought it was my best quilt yet.
    Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you too can become great. Mark Twain

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