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Thread: Does anyone here quilt Queens and Kings on their little machines?

  1. #1
    Junior Member Gayle8675309's Avatar
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    Does anyone here quilt Queens and Kings on their little machines?

    Getting my quilts long arm quilted is getting too dang expensive. I'm debating whether to try to quilt my queen sized quilt on my small janome machine. The largest I've done so far is a twin. It turned out pretty good...not error free, but for the most part it turned out acceptable.

    So do any of you quilt your large quilts at home on your small machines? I need to hear that it can be done. I'm really nervous to start a large quilt.

    Gayle

  2. #2
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    Yes. Take the Craftsy class on Big quilts on small machines.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gayle8675309 View Post
    Getting my quilts long arm quilted is getting too dang expensive. I'm debating whether to try to quilt my queen sized quilt on my small janome machine. The largest I've done so far is a twin. It turned out pretty good...not error free, but for the most part it turned out acceptable.

    So do any of you quilt your large quilts at home on your small machines? I need to hear that it can be done. I'm really nervous to start a large quilt.

    Gayle
    Gayle, I took the Craftsy class called "Big Quilts on Small Machines" Ann is a great teacher with great ideas on how to handle the batting, top and bottom. It worked for me. My Elna "1973" has 6.5". I did get a new Horizon in2012. Not the first year that they came out. The 11" is even better. Also took Ann's class on Machine Quilting. Getting better all the time.

  3. #3
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    I have done some on my home machine. It works best if you can do some stableizing stitches first. I will stitch in the ditch along the block edges. Then go back and do any quilting within the blocks. It does get a little hard to navigate sometimes but it is doable.

  4. #4
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    I have done several about queen size. I follow Leah Day's instructions for setting up the machine and sewing area. It is a lot of work but in the end, I've been happy with the results. Each time I see some improvement. Just plan on taking your time. I have a Pfaff 2134, by the way.

  5. #5
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I did a king size. I did stitch in the ditch and the blocks were set on point, so I started in the middle and worked out. Some of it was a wrestle, but, only the long rows to begin with. This was on a dinky mechanical Brother, Walmart type, which I still use and love (over 10 years old)

  6. #6
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    I have a longarm now, but before I got it I quilted big quilts in sections. Check out Marti Michell's book, Machine Quilting in Sections for lots of different ways to do it.

  7. #7
    Super Member Shelbie's Avatar
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    I quilt Kings and Queens all the time on my Janome 6500 or my Singer 201 which I think has as much space. The centre is the hardest part but it definitely is doable. Most of my quilts are scrap quilts that will see a lot of use and many washings. I just can't justify having these long arm quilted. I can do a stitch in the ditch, grid or simple meander and it works for me.
    Shelbie from the High County in Southern Ontario

  8. #8
    Junior Member Gayle8675309's Avatar
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    I have already taken the machine quilting class at Craftsey...I watched it last year, I think I'll go back and watch it again.

    I'm encouraged that some of you have done larger quilts on your machines. I might have to give this a go.

    Thanks!

    Gayle

  9. #9
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Look into 'quilt as you go' (QAYG) techniques. There are many. Here's a good tutorial on one method:

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/tutoria...s-t151139.html
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  10. #10
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    My next big quilt I do, I will the 2 halves and then join them. I will quilt both halves leaving 2 inches unquilted down the center on both halves. I will then join the 2 top sections down the middle by machine. I with trim the batting to meet down the center of the quilt and iron on batting join tape. I will then iron one side of the back fabric over the join and overlap the second piece of the back. I will pin it and ladder stitch the back seam. If everything looks perfect, I will quilt the last 4 inch section down the center of the quilt.

  11. #11
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    I too have a long arm (coming home on Sunday - yippeee!!) but I have quilted large quilts on my domestic. It can be a headache and some designs are just easier on a long arm because of the freedom of movement...but truthfully if you mark and sew carefully you can do just about anything on a domestic that you can a long arm. I also quilt in sections and it helps to quilt in a table or somewhere you can lay the section of the quilt that is NOT being quilted. Turning and pivoting for intricate designs can be a real headache...but before I could convince the Husband that I just NEEDED a long arm I had the motivation to do it on my domestic and I did. (But don't tell him that...)
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  12. #12
    Member kookey426's Avatar
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    I have always quilted on my DSM..the largest being 122x122..I just quilted FM in quarter sections..had a ball.it's when I have to SID that I don't like..too constricting....just practice,practice,practice..and relax and enjoy the process!!!

  13. #13
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    I quilted an oversized king quilt on my small Bernina. I cut the batting in 3rds. The middle section, I quilted first, then added one side of batting and quilted that side. Finally, I added the remaining batting and quilted that section. I used SID for the main part of the quilt and FMQ for the borders. The quilt turned out well; but I do usually try to send king and queen size quilts to the LAQ. Anything smaller, I try to quilt myself. I'm really working on my FMQ.

  14. #14
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    I quilted my last oversized queen in sections. I finished the whole top and the whole back then I cut the batting in 3 different sections. I'd quilt a section then whip stitch the next piece of batting in place, baste, then quilt. It took a little longer but I was really happy how it came out. Even with a 9" throat on my machine, I just didn't see how I could wrestle the quilt through there and not lose my mind!

  15. #15
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchnripper View Post
    I did a king size. I did stitch in the ditch and the blocks were set on point, so I started in the middle and worked out. Some of it was a wrestle, but, only the long rows to begin with. This was on a dinky mechanical Brother, Walmart type, which I still use and love (over 10 years old)
    Me, too. Same deal. It's a wrestling match at times, but can be done. And as mentioned, Marti Michell has some great tips in her book. Well worth looking at.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by franc36 View Post
    I quilted an oversized king quilt on my small Bernina. I cut the batting in 3rds. The middle section, I quilted first, then added one side of batting and quilted that side. Finally, I added the remaining batting and quilted that section. I used SID for the main part of the quilt and FMQ for the borders. The quilt turned out well; but I do usually try to send king and queen size quilts to the LAQ. Anything smaller, I try to quilt myself. I'm really working on my FMQ.
    This is the way I do large quilts. Works great for me.
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"
    Susan

  17. #17
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    It is possible to quilt on a domestic machine, but it takes time. When I am doing a queen DH helps me sometimes. That saves me from having to walk around the table to reposition/refold the sandwich and really speeds up things. My largest was 8'x 7.8' and it had a lot of appliques on it which was individually batted (is that a legal way to use that phrase) up to an inch thick in places and was a real challenge. But, with help from DH I did get it sewn. I do have a 6600 Janome and it has the "larger" space between needle and motor. I have an attitude that if I'm making a quilt, then I will make all my quilt. Having said that, I have seen incredibly beautiful quilting done by long arm professionals. Each person has to make up their own approach, keeping within what is really important to them (and it won't necessally make sense to the rest of us).

  18. #18
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    I've done a queen size on my vintage Bernina 830 Record, all in one piece, too. Didn't have any trouble with it, but it did take several days.
    Cindy

    Curator of an 1889 Singer model 27 Fiddlebase Treadle, a 1951 Singer Centennial Featherweight, a 1956 Singer 401A, and a 1982 Bernina 830 Record.

  19. #19
    Senior Member 4dogs's Avatar
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    I have done about a zillion quilts (I do a lot for LINUS) and I have done 2 KING size ones and lots of full size ones .. and I have never had someone else do the quilting......it has all been done on our "normal" machines....I use either my Bernina 630 or my little IRON LADY the 301 Singer to do them... there are spots that are a little more diffcult to do, but it is very doable.........just pin it really well to start with and then just take your time.. no rushing......it works.....
    Judy, retired RN, alias 4 dogs and in the mountains of western North Carolina.

    Someday you will be a memory - try to make it a good one .

  20. #20
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I think those that do quilt in sections and add the batting as they go so they don't have much bulk under the arm. I am sure there is a book on the subject. I haven't done it, just know it can be done
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

  21. #21
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    If you use the method of joining blocks as in quilt as you go no need to put whole quilt order until the borders.
    Methods is showing quilts done this way on angie quilts ,one lady manages and has very poor shoulders.
    The big quilts are usually done in 4 sections, I did a wedding ring in 9 sections. You can put sashing to join or just join straight edges . Imusuallydo a quilt over seam just to keep in pattern.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  22. #22
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    I do large quilts on my small machine all the time. Right now i am doing Baptist Fans on a quilt. First I make a sandwich on the left hand side of the quilt, leaving just the top and backing on the rest of the quilt which is easier to push through the harp. I quilt the sandwhiched side then sandwich the next third of the quilt(the middle) sewing the batting edges together and then pinning the sandwich smooth and proceed to quilt that. Finally I do the same to the righthand side of the quilt and voila! all done! A lot of work, but worth it. AND I do all this handling of cloth and batting sitting down as i'm unable to stand. Try that sometime!

  23. #23
    Senior Member QuiltingHaven's Avatar
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    Quilting queen size

    I quilt in three sections on queen size quilts. Then I sew the sections together and it works nicely. Also, I have l quilted squares as you go and then sewn the completed blocks together using my 1952 Featherweight - just love her.
    Busy in Ohio

  24. #24
    Super Member Abby'smom's Avatar
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    When I first started quilting, I did what is sometimes called lapquilting, doing the piecing/appliqueing of the block (20 inches or so with sashing) and then sandwiching and backing it and quilting it before sewing the blocks together (by machine on top and by hand on back) -- this method worked well and was easy to do on the machine -- as an alternative, strips of blocks could be done the same way -- I have seen other methods of quilting shown here on QB -- good luck as it seems that nothing is really easy and each method has drawbacks --
    diane

  25. #25
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    I suspend my larger quilts from the ceiling. If you are interested in more information, please private message me, I will send directions.
    JulieM

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