Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33

Thread: Does anyone quilt with goose down anymore?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    788
    Blog Entries
    2
    I have been asked by someone to make a quilt for them using goose down as the batting. Does anyone know how to do this so the "down" stays in place?

  2. #2
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,011
    I don't know, but my grandmother use to grow cotton and I have some of her quilts with carded cotton, still has some seeds in it. LOL.

  3. #3
    Super Member sawsan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Jordan
    Posts
    1,688
    Blog Entries
    40
    What's the penefit of it????????

  4. #4
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,161
    Blog Entries
    1
    I don't think goose down has ever been used in quilts. It is used in duvets. Maybe she wants you to make a duvet cover for a down comforter?

    As far as I know, there is no such thing as goose down batting. Cotton batting, polyester batting, bamboo batting, silk batting, wool batting, yes! Not goose down (or duck down, for that matter). Comforters made with down are always made commercially because there is such a control problem with handling down.

  5. #5
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    One of my friends made a sort of duvet cover for a down comforter. She did a top and backing and then pinned them both to the comforter, sewed around the edge and flip turned it. She said was like gutting a whale. LOL Anyway, it turned out really cool.

  6. #6
    Super Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    1,627
    Blog Entries
    3
    I would imagine you would do it like they make feather beds. Basically you sew channels and stuff them to hold the down in place. the narrower the channels the better the down will stay in place.

  7. #7
    Super Member watson's mom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Maidstone, Ont. Canada
    Posts
    2,542
    Go to 'Search' and put in 'duvet cover' , there are several pics there and ideas for duvet covers. That might be what you are looking for. Good luck.

  8. #8
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,955
    Quote Originally Posted by tkhooper
    I would imagine you would do it like they make feather beds. Basically you sew channels and stuff them to hold the down in place. the narrower the channels the better the down will stay in place.
    I agree with channels, but I also would sew horizontally and make them into squares. You know stuff & sew. My question is, where is she getting the down from? I hope its been cleaned well for allergy sake.

  9. #9
    Super Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    1,627
    Blog Entries
    3
    Handcock used to have down. I don't know of any other place and even then that was almost 20 years ago. I think I'm getting old.

  10. #10
    Super Member pittsburgpam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,496
    Are you sure that the person is sure of what they are asking for? Does the person think a quilt is a comforter and wants a down comforter? Does the person just think that "down" is THE thing to have in bedding?

    Maybe some educating is in order too.

  11. #11
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    10,327
    We have an old "feather bed" or "eider down", it is absolutely ancient and is currently stored away. If she is talking about the same thing - it is an old kind of duvet (ours dates from the 1920s), the down (usually duck) is stuffed into channels, the fabric containing the feathers is usually very dense and I do believe it was waxed or treated some way to prevent the pin feathers poking through. The whole thing was then encased in a satin/sateen cover which was then stitched on. Personally I don't like them and the same goes for feather pillows, they tend to clump and are not great for people with allergies. They are murder to wash and you have to keep tossing and shaking them about as they dry otherwise the feathers clog together.

    I doubt these days anyone sells the feathers to "do it yourself"...they would be a nightmare to control and absolutely no help to your respiratory system.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    788
    Blog Entries
    2
    Thanks everyone for all the information! Earthwalker, this is exactly what she wants and she has bags of down from a goose farm. It has all been cleaned. I know how they are to wash as I have one myself and the down always falls to one end. Whoever made mine didn't "channel" it. It makes total sense to do that though.

  13. #13
    Super Member tkhooper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gladys, VA
    Posts
    1,627
    Blog Entries
    3
    I do have to say I got rid of my featherbed. It hadn't been channeled either and the down always ended up on the edges of the bed rather than in the center where I wanted it. At that time I didn't even own a sewing machine and certainly wouldn't have tried to correct the problem. Although I did read about it. I'll read about almost anything.

  14. #14
    Gal
    Gal is offline
    Super Member Gal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand in the South Pacific
    Posts
    1,117
    When I was a young girl I used to stay at my Aunty Lil's home in the country, she was an old timer and I used to sleep in her spare room in an iron bed with a straw mattress on it with a feather mattress on top of that, both of which she made her self. On top of the bed was a duvet which she also made, filled with feathers, this had channels sewn into it and she stuffed the feathers into the channels. As far as I can remember she never quilted these duvets. In the morning we had to shake all three of these items as during the course of the night everything settled!
    Just to add to this story Aunty Lil's wedding ring was made from gold found in the local Cardrona river, I always thought that was so romantic! I am so pleased I experienced
    some of the old ways before they died out completely. Hope she is looking down and reading this!!!

    Gal

  15. #15
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    29,682
    I wouldn't try anything like that for myself and certainly not for someone else. Non sew people thing just about anything can be done that they can think of. I would tell her very nicely, she can try anything she wants to, just not you.

  16. #16
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Home town: Rehoboth, MA Now living in OK
    Posts
    7,897
    Quote Originally Posted by Jingleberry
    I wouldn't try anything like that for myself and certainly not for someone else. Non sew people thing just about anything can be done that they can think of. I would tell her very nicely, she can try anything she wants to, just not you.
    I agree, I would never try it either.

  17. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    3,393
    When a down comforter is made, the top and bottom are sewn together most of the way around. A small approximately 6" hole is left open. The feathers are then blown into the opening and the opening sewn shut. Some are made with multiple baffles, which are filled and sewn shut separately. In Germany, as I'm sure in other European countries, you can order your down comforter with the exact covering, feather and weight you want, lighter weight for summer or heavier for winter.

  18. #18
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    ELVERTA, CA
    Posts
    15,481
    Blog Entries
    1
    Those feathers have to be treated to be free of "nature." Probably not something for the do-it-yourselfer. Besides, there would be a lot of naked geese running around to even fill a pillow case - let alone a comforter.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    788
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by mytwopals
    When a down comforter is made, the top and bottom are sewn together most of the way around. A small approximately 6" hole is left open. The feathers are then blown into the opening and the opening sewn shut. Some are made with multiple baffles, which are filled and sewn shut separately. In Germany, as I'm sure in other European countries, you can order your down comforter with the exact covering, feather and weight you want, lighter weight for summer or heavier for winter.
    Thanks! I had some one pm me who has been reading this and has made them. This is exactly what she said to do and has given instruction for the multiple baffles.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    788
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter
    Those feathers have to be treated to be free of "nature." Probably not something for the do-it-yourselfer. Besides, there would be a lot of naked geese running around to even fill a pillow case - let alone a comforter.
    These have been cleaned. She has bags and bags of down so I have no doubt she would end up with a nicely stuffed comforter.

  21. #21
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,955
    So she's not wanting you to make her a quilt, its more of just making the comforter for her? I've got a down comforter and its done in boxes, that way the down doesn't just end up at one end of the comforter as if you just put in baffles. It makes fluffing up the comforter much easier and the warmth is all over then.

    If this is want she wants then this is how I would do it. I would sew 3 sides together, then turn inside out and do a topstitching along the 3 sides to stregthen the seams. I would put some down in and then do a line of stitching across the top and then restuff and sew till you get to the end and then sew the top closed and re-enforce with a topstitching.

  22. #22
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    And I would charge her a WHOLE lot to do this. You'll end up with a house full of down and be vaccuuming down for months afterward. Buy the highest thread count fabric you can find.

  23. #23
    Super Member GladGrams's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    1,516
    Hi
    I sleep under a down "duvet" every night, all year round, if it isn't on me, it is next to me. That being said, IMO down is not a filler for a quilt. As mentioned in another post, there is a specific process for making down duvets or as they are called in Norway - dyna (deena). We purchase or make covers and pillowcases to match and change them weekly. The feather duvet is put out in the sun or into the dryer to make sure any "living things" are killed. Kind of like taking the time to steam your mattress or use an ultraviolet light on it.

    A down duvet is for life, is you have bought a good one because there are places where they can remove and wash the feathers and replace them into a new cover.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Sparky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Salem, OR
    Posts
    333
    I have 3 down duvets which I love. They are light weight and warm. There is a difference $$$ between down and goose feathers!! I do not have mine covered with a duvet cover as I use them as a blanket. One is over 50 years old, and to me it is priceless.

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    49
    Years ago, I made several Frostline kits - down jackets. The packets of down were very compressed into narrow packages (maybe she could do this for you) Then when you were putting it together, you had a packet for each section - channel, and you carefully squeezed the down out of the plastic bag it was in, and into the channel. If she was willing to "package" the down, it would make it much easier for you. I don't know if Frostline is still doing business, but their products were very good - my daughter and I wore the jackets and vests for years.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.