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Thread: Double-ended needle

  1. #1
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Would like to try "stabbing" method of hand quilting and saw in an old mag, an ad for double-ended needles. Tried to Google for them, but to no avail. Anyone know where to get them? Or has used them?

    Thanks again, friends

  2. #2
    GrandmaAva's Avatar
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    I have one, but have never used it.

  3. #3
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    When I first learned to quilt (100 years ago!) my teacher had them--don't know where to get them now though. She did have a method where you didn't have to bury the knot though, she left a long tail, sewed in one direction then rethreaded the needle with the tail and sewed in the opposite direction!

  4. #4
    Super Member roseOfsharon's Avatar
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    Hi Bernie, I too have learned that at the hand quilting class I took. Start at the middle and leave half the thread behind and once finished the first end, thread the other end and go the oppisite way.

  5. #5
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    google John James Twin Pointed Stab Stitch Needles.

    the thing to remember is that having the eye in the middle makes the needles very fragile. make sure you don't hold the needle by the eye.

    there are instructions on the back of the packages. it really pays to follow those instructions. they're pricey, but i recommend you buy at least one extra pack for practice.

    don't ask how i came to that conclusion. :lol:

  6. #6
    Super Member virtualbernie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roseOfsharon
    Hi Bernie, I too have learned that at the hand quilting class I took. Start at the middle and leave half the thread behind and once finished the first end, thread the other end and go the oppisite way.
    Yup! :lol:

  7. #7
    Super Member roseOfsharon's Avatar
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    Ahh, I looked up needles and didn't see them.. I will look them up again by John James... I am curious.

  8. #8
    Senior Member quiltstodo's Avatar
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    Check www.123stitch.com and in the search I put John James. Several sizes which would you use for this?

  9. #9
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    the higher the number, the thinner the needles will be.

    thinner needles (size 10 if they have them) will be easier to poke through the layers, but will be most fragile.

    i wouldn't recommend anything bigger than a size 8. they should work well if your hand-quilting muscles are well developed.

  10. #10
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Patrice, they (123stitch) are only showing sizes 22 - 28. They are under $3 for a 3 pk. I've never hand quilted before and would like to try the "push-pull" method.

    Thanks for the info on fragility!

    Those old magazines that I couldn't sell are sure leading me to some unusual searches! Like the one for the Universal presser foot lifter. (no longer sold)

  11. #11
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Aha! Found #10's here @ $2.95 / 3 pk.

    http://www.quiltingbookspatternsandn...%20James%20Co.

  12. #12
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    double eyed hand sewing needle

    http://www.theknittingcloset.com/pd_double.cfm


    clover also makes them for hand sewing. item #6 - 9 0n this page

    http://www.createforless.com/search/...ewing%20needle

  13. #13
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
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    there are lots of needles with one eye in the center. what can you do with those that you can't do with a regular needle?

  14. #14
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    there are lots of needles with one eye in the center. what can you do with those that you can't do with a regular needle?
    If a person (me) does not want to do a running stitch for hand quilting, I can do a "stab" stitch (stab straight down through the quilt and then straight up through the quilt) with one hand under the quilt and one on top. rather than having the underneath hand turning the needle around to point up, the needle with points on both ends can just be poked back up. Its not that the eye is in the middle for a reason other than where else would it be if both ends are pointed.

    You found some double EYED needles and I don't know what they would be used for but would not be useful in this application. Others I found were too big for hand quilting, but thanks for looking!

  15. #15
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by butterflywing
    there are lots of needles with one eye in the center. what can you do with those that you can't do with a regular needle?
    instead of tiring your wrists and hands from the rocking and turning of the needle, you use one hand on top of the quilt, and the other under. doing one stitch at a time, you can pull the needle through in each direction. stitch straight up and down without turning the needle.

    it takes practice, good light, and a properly positioned quilting frame. once you get the hang of it you can zip along pretty well. it's easier on the neck, back, wrists and hands.

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