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Thread: Economical foundation fabric

  1. #26
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    Sorry some kind of glitch in my computer. It froze up and of course I kept hitting the send button!

  2. #27
    Power Poster ann clare's Avatar
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    Great tip.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pollyv9
    I was just reading the comments, (don't you just love going back to see what everyone is saying) and a question popped into my head. I stopped at a garage sale an hour or so ago on my way to see a friend and picked up a Ralph Lauren large mans shirt. It is 100% cotton and is an absolutely beautiful navy blue plaid (the cost was $1.00). Just down the rack a short distance I found another Ralph Lauren ladies XXL shirt, it is also $100% cotton. They both feel wonderful, almost silky. My question is how is this 100% cotton fabric different from the 100% quilting cotton? I will be watching for replies.
    Might be a tighter weave with finer threads. Sort of like the differences in thread counts of sheets.

    By the way, on the shirts, Good Score!

  4. #29
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Men's shirts are great for quilting. The fabric is called shirting. Check out the queen of men's shirt recycled into quilt fabric:

    http://quiltville.com/

    She has a book all about using them: Scraps and Shirttails

    She recycles every tiny bit of fabric into quilts.

  5. #30
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I wish people would say "less expensive" instead of "cheaper"

    One can still find nice/decent/good fabrics at comparatively "reasonable" prices if one knows what one is looking for and where to look.

    "cheaper", to me, implies inferior quality.
    The Frugal Gourmet used to say FRUGAL...the ability to save money on things you could in order to splurge on things you want. Like making your own stock and spending $15.00 a pound for fancy mushrooms!

    I LOVE FRUGAL!!! Use up those scraps, buy at the resale shop, scrap that mayo and ketsup jar, turn down the heat, etc.!
    Put me near a vintage machine and I'm ALL IN!!!!!

  6. #31
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    Men's shirts are great for quilting. The fabric is called shirting. Check out the queen of men's shirt recycled into quilt fabric:

    http://quiltville.com/

    She has a book all about using them: Scraps and Shirttails

    She recycles every tiny bit of fabric into quilts.
    That shirt buying bug got me - :) :oops:

    I'm now band from buying any more shirts! ;-)

  7. #32
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    I have seen the quilts made form shirts, love them!

  8. #33
    Senior Member Lizzytish's Avatar
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    This is how the pioneers got their fabrics. The very first quilters of America.

  9. #34
    Super Member topper1's Avatar
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    i bought size 2x blouse at thrift yesterday and am using it for my bowtucks purse, has purple backgound , blue flowers reallynice material, have some left over for stash too. do it all time. I always get nice material though, dont go fo r inferior fabric. Impovise lke my mom and gramma did.

  10. #35
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    I, too, have used the center from bedskirts as foundation fabric for crumb or string blocks. I also use used dryer sheets as foundations. The drawback for dryer sheets is that they are not that big. The largest block that I've been able to get from them is 6 inches square. Finished blocks will be only 5 1/2 inches square, due to the seam allowance, but I just finished a string quilt (throw size) using the 6 inch dryer sheet foundations.

  11. #36
    Google Goddess craftybear's Avatar
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    thanks for the tip

    Quote Originally Posted by Pollyv9
    I don't know how many of you use fabric other than "quilting cotton", but I often do. I use good condition thrift store garments, new dressmaker blend fabrics and anything that is a color or pattern that I love. Something that came to me this morning when I started sewing was the fabric I was using for the foundation. I acquired several new bed skirts. They had never been used and were great colors and patterns, I cut the skirts off, washed and ironed them and was getting ready to throw the center part away when it occurred to me that it would be good for the scrappy crazy quilts I like to make. It does great. There are always many of these at the thrift store. Maybe you can use this idea too.

  12. #37
    Senior Member lindagor's Avatar
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    In this economy it's very hard to be a fabric "purist". I take pride in being able to repurpose fabric I've found in thrift stores or from yard sales in whatever original form it may have come in. If you know fabric you can tell by the tightness of the weave and the feel of it if it's cheap or not.

  13. #38
    Super Member Crafty1's Avatar
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    Great tip! I have clothing in my closet that I no longer wear so these will come in handy one day!!! :)

  14. #39
    Super Member BonniFeltz's Avatar
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    When I get read to do a crazy quilt, I usually go to the Salvation Army or Goodwill store and look at the clothing. Our Salvation Army and Goodwill Stores have a "color tag" of the day. If you buy clothing and it has a color tag that was designated color of the day, you get the item for 49 cents. That goes a long way on fabric if they carry the larger sizes.

    I might have to start to looking there for other times also. Also their sheets are usually only $2.

  15. #40
    Senior Member Lori L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rural City Girl
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    Quote Originally Posted by Lori L
    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray
    I wish people would say "less expensive" instead of "cheaper"

    One can still find nice/decent/good fabrics at comparatively "reasonable" prices if one knows what one is looking for and where to look.

    "cheaper", to me, implies inferior quality.
    I'm sorry..... I was trying to say "less money" by using the word cheaper. You're right......there are better words to use which don't sound sooo.......cheap?????
    No criticism intended to any of the posts -

    It's just when I was growing up, if anything/anyone was referred to as "cheap" - it was not meant as a compliment - old conditioning/associations are hard for me to outgrow.

    So - if I've offended anyone, please accept my apologies.
    Absolutely no offense taken!!!! I can understand why you feel that way. This is what I like about this board (for the majority of the time) we can voice our differing opinions, and agree to disagree without hard feelings, or feeling offended. :)
    There was not a thing wrong with your request for us to use a different adjective beside "cheap". LOL. There are thousands of words out there which can get the point across. My grandmother, who was raised during the Depression use to say "I'm thrifty." She had the same roll of tinfoil for as long as I remember and just wiped it off, folded it up and put it in the drawer like it was reuseable. Same with baggies. I still have some of her freezer baggies marked "Fiddleheads 1962". I won't let anyone throw them away. They're my heirlooms, haha. Anyway.....don't be concerned with your request/post. There was absolutely no offense taken. Take care, Lori

  16. #41
    Super Member mountain deb's Avatar
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    Also be on the look out for auctions, I lucked out on one that had a lot of fabric that I will post later. Got a good deal on it to.

  17. #42
    Super Member Quilter2B's Avatar
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    I did a similar thing when I used a mattress pad for batting: I was going to throw away the part that covered the sides of the mattress when I realized it was similar weight to my embroidery stabilizer, so after I cut off the elastic I rolled it up and am going to use it next time I embroider quilt blocks. Money is tight so necessity is the mother of invention!!!

  18. #43
    Member Rural City Girl's Avatar
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    Getting back to the point of this thread, instead of what the word cheap means to people, I think the shirt idea is a good one. Never really thought about it. I think it's fun to think of different ways to use fabrics and especially if it saves us money! I like to save money.

  19. #44
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    Go back to the utility quilts made during "hard times" - people used a lot of stuff we wouldn't even think of putting in a quilt - and some of these quilts are still around - maybe worse for wear, but still around.

    Sugar sacks, old suits, the "good" parts of worn sheets and clothing - a little fade was not a big deal then.

    "New - unused" fabric was a big deal for some folks.

  20. #45
    Super Member franie's Avatar
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    Love your idea!

  21. #46
    Super Member grandme26's Avatar
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    Have never thought of a thrift store but that does open up a huge way to collect fabrics for a scrappy quilt. Will have to look at some around here.

  22. #47
    Super Member sewmuchmore's Avatar
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    I have found that you can find fabric at a reasonable price.But I will not pass up a good buy. I like to make a baby rag quilt with nice chenille, I found a 3XX chenille robe for $3.49 it had about 4 yards. Lot's of people here are selling there fabric at a low price. I am loving it!!! And many are giving to others. My sister said I hold on Washington so tight that he cries. LOL

  23. #48
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    thanks... it's a good idea for scrap biscuit patches,

  24. #49
    Senior Member rhueluna's Avatar
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    I knew she meant less expensive and know we all are just chatting and not to be taken so seriously in the wording.

  25. #50
    Power Poster sharon b's Avatar
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    Great Tip :thumbup:

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