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Thread: Ever wonder just how long

  1. #1
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    Ever wonder just how long

    Tonight I stopped by the fabric store to buy some backing material for two lapquilts. I was shocked at how much I spent, even though the fabric was on sale. I didn't dare look around at anything else, I did wonder driving home, how long can I afford to spend this money then give it away? Can I afford when I retire? I think about those things.

  2. #2
    Super Member Quiltngolfer's Avatar
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    I think when we give, it always comes back to us in some way. I have stocked up a lot of fabric so I should have plenty to make and give away for a long while. The family knows that I always want money or gift cards to spend on fabric, and they reap the benefits with quilts.

  3. #3
    Senior Member LovinMySoldier's Avatar
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    And unfortunately it seems as though lots of non quilters dont understand just HOW MUCH fabric costs. And how much time it takes to make a quilt. So sad.
    "I am a military wife... What's your super power?"

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  4. #4
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    I thought about this exact thing yesterday. Scary.

  5. #5
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    I guess I just think where there's a will, there's a way. Maybe part of my retirement will be spent in a fabric shop working part-time to pay for my habits.

  6. #6
    Super Member DOTTYMO's Avatar
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    But think how much a gym workout, membership and outfits and no stress free work or end product to give with love.
    Finished is better than a UFO

  7. #7
    Senior Member gingerd's Avatar
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    Yes! I too think about this. I have a small stash and try to use it, but never fail I don't have enough to make a pattern. I haven't jumped into making a scrappy. That may be what I need to do to use what I have.

    Giving and not understanding, yes. However, those that I give to it doesn't bother me.
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  8. #8
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    I save 99% of my fabric when I'm cutting for a quilt. I have clear plastic bins about the size of 2 shoe boxes and I keep 1"squares,2"squares, and odd size scraps in those. That way when I need a small piece I can go to my scrap bins and use from there. My daughter doesn't see the sense in this,she says it's fabric ocd and I can't bear to give up any part of my fabric. But it makes it so much easier if you need small pieces and you have some that you have already cut along the way.

  9. #9
    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
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    Once you retire figure out how much of your budget you can afford to spend on fabrics and then get creative - shop coupon stores like Hancock and Joann - shop thrift stores for both fabric and clothing that can be used as quilting fabric - perhaps even find a part time job to fund your quilting!

  10. #10
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I started thinking of retirement from the first day on my first job. LOL. I quit working as soon as DH could support our household with his salary. My plans are to use my SS to be my quilting budget so I can still be generous with my quilts.
    Got fabric?

  11. #11
    Super Member Luv Quilts and Cats's Avatar
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    I think about this too. How high can fabric go? I am using my stash right now as I am still looking for a job. It kills me not to be able to buy any fabric right now, but really, I have enough to last for awhile and my friends and I "shop" each other's stash all the time. When I start working again, I don't think I will buy fabric with abandon like I used to. That's just the new reality I guess.
    Luv Quilts and Cats
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  12. #12
    Super Member MartiMorga's Avatar
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    Ladies, calm down!!! My husband and I have been retired for 16 years and you will always be able to quilt. Between your stash, your savings from not driving to work, buying clothes for work, going out ot lunch everyday or packing your lunch, and of course your management of money, you will be fine. I try to keep my "hobby" spending to $100 or less a month. Of course there are months I don't spend that much and some months I go over. You manage and you will too

  13. #13
    Super Member willferg's Avatar
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    I make lap quilts, so the size can be pretty flexible. I find that fleece, at 60" wof, is very reasonable for backing. I also shop at Ross and other stores like that and look for soft throws on sale to use for backings – they are often under $10 for a 50" x 60".
    People who start projects and never finish them are cooler
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  14. #14
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
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    I've been retired just short of a year. We're comfortable but I think twice before just stash building. For years, my BFF and I have gone fabric shopping, looking for bargains to build our stash, or "saving for our retirement". With the prices going so high, I've never been more thankful for all the yards I have tucked away. I try to only buy what's necessary to complete a quilt but try to rely on my stash. It's an entirely different mind set and think there's more warmth and personal depth in my quilts now. Instead of searching for the absolute perfect fabric, my mindset is now "use what you have or close enough". Thank heavens for CT though. When I can buy 4 yards of sale fabric for around $12 to back my quilts or use as sashings, I'm overjoyed.

    Like any other commodity, the sky is the limit as to how far prices can go.

  15. #15
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    I try not to overthink, but am not always successful! While a friend needs the "Perfect" fabric for backings, I almost always buy backing fabric when I find good sales. If I can buy 4 - 8 yards at $4 or so a yard, I do it. When I have a smaller quilt, I look at the smaller of my large pieces, and for bigger ones, I check what I've got that's at least 8 yards. For some folks, trips to Goodwill or other thrift stores are what makes it doable.

    And yes, I've got that stash... That's my investment for retirement - instead of using it sometimes, as it works, I'll need to use it as much as possible. one way or another, I'm hoping to be able to keep doing quilts that are donated.

  16. #16
    Super Member LAQUITA's Avatar
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    I was told one day recently that we are buying (collecting fabric) NOW so that we will have PLENTY to do once we do retire and have no more $. So about right huh?
    LaQuita (aka) - Yai-Yai to the most precious grandbaby around of course I'm partial! LOL

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  17. #17
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I have thought about this alot, scary!!!

  18. #18
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    Stock up while you can. Batting, backings, thread. Fabric is rather easy to come by.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  19. #19
    Super Member deedum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAQUITA View Post
    I was told one day recently that we are buying (collecting fabric) NOW so that we will have PLENTY to do once we do retire and have no more $. So about right huh?
    I like the way you think.

  20. #20
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deedum View Post
    Tonight I stopped by the fabric store to buy some backing material for two lapquilts. I was shocked at how much I spent, even though the fabric was on sale. I didn't dare look around at anything else, I did wonder driving home, how long can I afford to spend this money then give it away? Can I afford when I retire? I think about those things.
    remember to hit thrift stores for good used sheets and light weight blankets as well as faBRIC
    Bad Spellers of the World
    U N T I E

  21. #21
    Senior Member kaelynangelfoot's Avatar
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    I buy a lot of fabric on Ebay. If you hunt around you can find some great deals, such as boxes of misc fabric quarters/yards sold by the pound. I bought a box of 10 lbs of cotton quilting fabric for $50 (including shipping) and estimate that I got about 25 yards of usable fabric out of it.

  22. #22
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    I am retired and have set aside $200 a month for quilting. I even have my own separate checking account for it. I've noticed I spend about $150 average each month. It's like budgeting your checking account. Set aside money for it and stick with that budget.

  23. #23
    Senior Member pyffer3's Avatar
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    Well, I must confess what I have been purchasing. I have bought blankets (feels simular to an electric blanket, only thinner) at $5.00 for twin size at the local dollar store. I have only completed 3 quilts and two more I am currently glueing together to get ready for quilting this weekend/next week. I use these blankets for my batting. Then I purchase twin size sheets from Wal-Mart at $4.97 for the backing. I know these are probably not "real" quilting items, but I didn't want to spend a lot of money because 1. I wasn't sure I would like quilting and 2. I am on a budget too. I have purchased good fabric for the quilt tops....Connecting Threads, Ebay, JoAnne's, Hobby Lobby. So, I figured up what I spent on the quilt I am currently working on for my sister's wedding gift. It's just a lap size. I bought the fabric in the clearance section on Connecting Threads for the top, spent about $16.00 with enough left over to make a couple of throw pillos, $5.00 for the blanket/batting, $4.97 for the sheet backing, $3.00 for the thread, and I did purchase more fabric for the binding - about $6.00. So, I only have about $35.00 total into the quilt. I don't think that's bad and I can afford to keep quilting. Also, those soft, fleecy throws are only $2.50 at the local dollar store and made a perfect backing for a large baby blanket I recently finished for my first grandchild. After using the blanket for batting I went back to the dollar store and bought all they had so I have 4 more left to use. So, I guess I am mindful of the expense associated with quilting. Fabric is really expensive!

  24. #24
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    Good Morning! Everyone. I'm new on the QB and have only done a couple small quilts. I did make a diaper bag. I found one at a garage sale, took it apart and just winged it. That was 8 years ago. it did turn out pretty cute and was disposed of. That just hit me the wrong way and I just stopped. I've decided that if any quilting I did was going to be disposed of the way I wanted it. so enough of the pityparty. I'm back and ready. I never got rid of my stash though. When I started going through it, I was amazed at what I had. I also remembered all the places that I picked up my material. That was a couple of weeks ago. I informed my husband I going sailing (as in garage, estate, moving, etc.). "OK, that's what I thought. Anything you want me to do?) He knew something was up when the machine was sitting back on the card table. I told him to just keep his eyes open and enough cash in his wallet. He picks material up for me also to and from work. So just "GO SAILING".

  25. #25
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    I retired a year ago and still work part-time. Thank goodness for a rather extensive stash of fabric otherwise I would not be able to quilt. I did buy a longarm quilting machine with part of my retirement money and am taking in quilting to help support my habit but it is very slow going trying to build a quilting business.
    I was recently asked to donate a couple of quilts for a fundraiser and had to search my stash and determine if i had the fabric to do it with buying more before I could commit. I also told my guild I would quilt a couple of their donation quilts each month rather than spending money on fabric to make donation quilts.
    I think you just have to make different decisions when your budget is more limited. I can't imagine giving up quilting. I am learning to make scrappier quilts also.

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