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Thread: Fat Thread?

  1. #26
    Super Member vicki reno's Avatar
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    It wasn't maybe two spools going through the same needle? I've done that before to get a more noticeable stitch.

  2. #27
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    no, it was a single thread but i think part of it was that it was a shinny thread. i bought some 40 wt and it was reeeal close.

  3. #28
    Senior Member mary705's Avatar
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    Beautiful either way, hand or machine stitched.

    OOps, didn't realize there was another page. The comment was for the turtle block. :D

  4. #29

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    I am working on my first quilt ever, and I also bought varigated thread. I couldn't woit to use it, but as I am taking a class to learn some quilting skills, my teacher had a hissy fit and said no.

    I wondered if there are some guidlines to using varigated thread so it doesn't compete with all the hard work I've done making my blocks? (sometimes daily arguements with my sewing machine...)

    I plan to use the thread in my next quilt (assuming I ever finish the first one that is :) ) and it would be helpful to know what I am doing.


  5. #30

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    I have an HQ16 long arm. Some of the threads that I purchase from Superior Threads are a lot thicker than others. Especially the verigated. Superior's website is very informative to all the different types of threads and their uses. I seem to remember some heavier threads designed for hand quilting, but I'm more familiar with the ones that I use on my long arm.
    Happy Quilting!
    Candy

  6. #31

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    I've quilted several quilts using verigated. Superior threads has "stitch out" charts that show you what theirs would look like in stitching. Go for it!

  7. #32
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    well i bought a ball of the # crochet cotton that Patrice mentioned. I really thinks that's it. I haven't had enough time to play with it but I tried it in the bobbin and ir worked and looked just fine. Tried it thru the needle and it kinda wadded up on the bottom, had regular thread in bobbin. I figured if I used it on top and bobbin it would be too heavy but I may try it or learn to quilt from the bottom!

  8. #33
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathy
    well i bought a ball of the # crochet cotton that Patrice mentioned. I really thinks that's it. I haven't had enough time to play with it but I tried it in the bobbin and ir worked and looked just fine. Tried it thru the needle and it kinda wadded up on the bottom, had regular thread in bobbin. I figured if I used it on top and bobbin it would be too heavy but I may try it or learn to quilt from the bottom!
    Hey Kathy, when you say it kind of wadded up on the bottom, do you mean the bottom of the needle (like at the eye), or on the back of your quilt?

  9. #34
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    Carla, I'm going thru my posts looking for something and see I never answered your question, it was wadded up on the bottom of the quilt, but looked real good on top, any suggestions?

  10. #35
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Hey Kathy,

    It could be a couple of things. The first thing I would check is, of course, the tension; sounds like the top tension may be a bit too loose to compensate for the varying weights of the top & bobbin threads.. maybe bump the top tension up a bit. If this does not work, try a bigger needle with a bigger eye. The larger needle shaft will create a larger hole for the thread to settle into, & the larger eye will create less friction on the larger thread. Also, as suggested earlier, you could always wind it into your bobbin, flip it over, & quilt from the back... it's interesting to do it that way at the very least. :lol:

    If these suggestions don't work, PM or email me & we'll get it figured out. Then you can post your solution if you want... or keep 'em guessing... :lol: j/k

    Let me know how things work out for you.

  11. #36
    Senior Member anita211's Avatar
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    Sashiko quilting (Japanese) uses something like a #5 perle cotton to make big stitches. It looks lovely especially done in the clamshell design on blue denim. They use almost a crewel needle for that type of quilting.

    As to quilting stitches showing: I handquilt a whole lot of my stuff. I WANT the stitching to show. The Amish use black thread regardless of the color of the quilt so that the exquisite quilting shows. I am trying to get as good as they are... but it isn't working. I can get maybe 8 stitches to an inch, not the 12 in a wall hanging I have made by some Amish sisters which is white and is quilted with white. It is truly beautiful.

    I decided long ago that if I wanted to do something big (bed sized) I would tie it. I handquilt most of my wall hangings. It is relaxing and I get kudos for the quilting, not just the pattern, color arrangement, etc. And as I make a lot of Amish style quilts, my quilting shows nicely.

    I am presently machine quilting a wall hanging that has about a zillion seams and I wanted that quilting to show also to add to the beautiful colors. Besides, handquilting over seams is NOT much fun. I chose a wavy decorative stitch that shows up on the strips. However, machine quilting is not my style. I have a Flynn frame, and several other things that would make machine quilting fairly easy, I would think, but I prefer sitting down in the evening with a quilt in my lap.It helps to unwind me after a long day at work.

    Okay, lunch is over... back to work!

    Anita


  12. #37
    Senior Member k_jupiter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anita211
    Sashiko quilting (Japanese) uses something like a #5 perle cotton to make big stitches. It looks lovely especially done in the clamshell design on blue denim. They use almost a crewel needle for that type of quilting.

    As to quilting stitches showing: I handquilt a whole lot of my stuff. I WANT the stitching to show. The Amish use black thread regardless of the color of the quilt so that the exquisite quilting shows. I am trying to get as good as they are... but it isn't working. I can get maybe 8 stitches to an inch, not the 12 in a wall hanging I have made by some Amish sisters which is white and is quilted with white. It is truly beautiful.

    I decided long ago that if I wanted to do something big (bed sized) I would tie it. I handquilt most of my wall hangings. It is relaxing and I get kudos for the quilting, not just the pattern, color arrangement, etc. And as I make a lot of Amish style quilts, my quilting shows nicely.

    I am presently machine quilting a wall hanging that has about a zillion seams and I wanted that quilting to show also to add to the beautiful colors. Besides, handquilting over seams is NOT much fun. I chose a wavy decorative stitch that shows up on the strips. However, machine quilting is not my style. I have a Flynn frame, and several other things that would make machine quilting fairly easy, I would think, but I prefer sitting down in the evening with a quilt in my lap.It helps to unwind me after a long day at work.

    Okay, lunch is over... back to work!

    Anita
    Ya know what my fingers say?

    Crewel, crewel needles.

    After reading my earlier posts... I use size 75 quilting needles for 50/3 thread. I use size 90 needles for 40/3 thread. The size 12 thread I have run through was also done with the size 90 needle on the mighty Bernina 830 with no problems. Now anything larger than that will probably have to be used in the bobbin. The thought of messin with the tension on the bobbin case gives me the willies.

    tim in san jose

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