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Thread: Favorite Tip or Helpful Hint

  1. #26
    Senior Member PghPat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilliebee
    Hi, seems there are lots of tips and tricks to be found online. Just wondering if anyone has a favorite they'd like to share.
    I just learned one from an Anita Solomon Grossman book which she uses when starching large quantities of fabric. I rarely startch, but I love this tip: partially dry your fabric and throw it in the fridge or better yet the freezer. Iron when you have time. Something about the coldness of the fabric makes it iron even smoother. Don't know why, but it sure works, especially when I don't have time to iron and don't want the fabric to get too dry or go sour.
    I remember when I was growing up (long time ago :roll: ) that my mom sprinkled her clothes and put them in a plastic bag an put it in the fridge - and yes, the clothes did iron much easier than when we just sprinkled them and ironed them right away.

  2. #27

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    I love to iron, too. When I don't have time to sew but want to pick up the great energy in my sewing room, I grab some fabric that I have just bought or fabric that has been stored for awhile and iron it. I feel great afterwards!

    And when I'm ironing and need steam, I use a spray bottle instead. Seems to give me more control, and my wrinkles (well, the FABRIC'S wrinkles) come out so much easier and more quickly.

  3. #28
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    I use to do that with my then husbands shirts some 40 years ago. It works

  4. #29
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    I just spent a week at Quilting By The Lake in class with Anita Grossman Solomon - great class and great time. My question is "Where the heck do I find liquid starch?" I checked my two local grocery chains, Walmart and Target and can't find it anywhere. Checked on line and they want a ridiculous price for it and shipping on top of that?

  5. #30
    Crickett Sweet's Avatar
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    Here's my tip. I use two small squares of the rubbery gridded shelf liner that we all use under the presser foot to keep it from walking away for my machine quilting. I was away at a retreat and a friend wanted to machine quilt but didn't have her quilting gloves. She cut up some of this stuff into approx. 4" squares to put under her fingers and it worked for her. When I got home, I tried this and found it so much more convenient than the gloves, which you seem to take off and put on a lot.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JNCT14
    My favorite tip was the directions for making a large top for my ironing board. WOW. It is SO much easier to iron big pieces of fabric and binding strips......and I had it together in 3 hours. Easy, cheap and highly effective. My kind of tip..............
    Where did you find the pattern for the large top?

  7. #32
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    What a great idea!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thank you so much.

  8. #33
    Senior Member Twilliebee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crickett Sweet
    I just spent a week at Quilting By The Lake in class with Anita Grossman Solomon - great class and great time. My question is "Where the heck do I find liquid starch?" I checked my two local grocery chains, Walmart and Target and can't find it anywhere. Checked on line and they want a ridiculous price for it and shipping on top of that?
    I've been on the hunt for old fashioned powdered startch since I got her Rotary Cutting Revolution book. I know it's out there somewhere....... Good luck!

  9. #34
    Senior Member Twilliebee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorniki
    Quote Originally Posted by JNCT14
    My favorite tip was the directions for making a large top for my ironing board. WOW. It is SO much easier to iron big pieces of fabric and binding strips......and I had it together in 3 hours. Easy, cheap and highly effective. My kind of tip..............
    Where did you find the pattern for the large top?
    There's one here on the board and quite a few online at other sites.

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-57168-1.htm

  10. #35
    Junior Member Debka's Avatar
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    You have all reminded me - I remember my mother had a sprinkling bottle next to the iron, filled with water. It was teal colored, and the water came out in perfect sprinkle-sized drops for ironing. The top screwed on and off for filling. I'm going to look on ebay to see if such a thing is around anymore. I may have to make my own - salad dressing bottle and poke holes in the top? 2 liter soda bottle with holes poked in the top? Hmm, I will get creative.

  11. #36
    Junior Member Debka's Avatar
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    Wow - just googled sprinkling bottles. (I know, I need to get busy with something else...) There are so many of them out there - plastic, glass, metal, vintage mostly. Who knew?

  12. #37
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilliebee
    Quote Originally Posted by Crickett Sweet
    I just spent a week at Quilting By The Lake in class with Anita Grossman Solomon - great class and great time. My question is "Where the heck do I find liquid starch?" I checked my two local grocery chains, Walmart and Target and can't find it anywhere. Checked on line and they want a ridiculous price for it and shipping on top of that?
    I've been on the hunt for old fashioned powdered startch since I got her Rotary Cutting Revolution book. I know it's out there somewhere....... Good luck!
    Here is a link to the starch
    http://www.lehmans.com/store/Home_Go...erid=shopzilla

  13. #38
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    The original hint reminded me of my mother. She hated to iron--and this was back when everything we wore had to be ironed. She'd dampen the clothes, roll each item up, put it in a laundry bag, and throw it in the freezer. When she wanted something to wear from the bag, she'd take it out to thaw enough to unroll it and iron it then. Sometimes she had more laundry in the freezer than food!

  14. #39
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    For liquid starch or powdered starch, try a small-town home-owned grocery store--esp. one in a rural area. Country people still use it, so the stores stock it. I live in a small town and it's always available.

    Laundries use it too, so you might check to see if a laundry in your area will sell you some. You'll probably have to take your own jar along when you go to ask.

  15. #40
    Super Member Nanjun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobo2000
    When I was a kid back in the 40's, my grandmother would sprinkle the clothes and roll them tightly. If she couldn't
    get to the ironing the next morning she would store them in an old refrigerator in the basement until she could get around to ironing.
    I did this too. Working 40 to 60 hrs a week I had to iron a few pieces at a time. They seemed to iron so much better after they were frozen.

  16. #41
    Senior Member sylviak's Avatar
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    When I was a teenager, my Mom would pay me $1.00 per bushel to iron my Dad's white shirts. He was a minister, and that was the only kind of shirt he wore. She would wash them, make up the starch and add to the rinse, then hang them on the line. They were so stiff! Then we sprinkled them with water and put them in plastic bags. I don't remember them being in the fridge, but I sure remember the hours spent ironing them! I was SO-O-O happy when permanent press came into existance. I don't know why it has gone out of style...I hate ironing and don't like to look wrinkled!

  17. #42
    Junior Member jemcnutt's Avatar
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    During the hard times, years ago, my precious mother took in ironing to help out. She was forced to be a stay at home mom, taking care of my mentally retarded sister and me. She was paid $1.25 per dozen items - usually work uniforms. You never opened the fridge without finding it stuffed with a big plastic bag of damp, starched clothes waiting for her magic touch. Thanks for bringing back the memory!

  18. #43
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    I use a pop-up style kleenex box for my clipped threads. I tore the plastic out of the top, leaving a nice size oval for putting those threads. I can either toss the whole box, or empty it out and use it again. Works for me. Also, I use paper towel and toilet paper tubes for wrapping bindings around before I sew them to the quilt. This works especially well for transporting them to the long arm quilter. Finally, I save those plastic boxes that lettuce comes in. They work great for storing just about anything. The lids snap tight.

  19. #44
    Junior Member iamjanet's Avatar
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    My mother used to put the clothes in the refrigerator until she got ready to iron -- but I always thought it was to prevent them from getting moldy , in the event she couldn't get to them right away.

  20. #45
    Super Member Minnisewta's Avatar
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    My husband irons his own shirts. He's much better at it then me and he can't complain if it's not too his standards. He came well trained by his Mother and can do just about anything he sets his mind to. I'm very lucky.

  21. #46
    Junior Member woody1229's Avatar
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    One of my favorite things is a flat wooden tv tray (purchased at Goodwill for $5). I covered it with several layers of felt and then made a muslin fitted "sheet" for it. I take it to classes, retreats and set it up at home right by my sewing machine. My own private little ironing board! No waiting in line to press at class, no taking up tons of space at home.[/quote]

    Oh I love this one! I needed a mini ironing board next to my machine because the big one doesn't fit in the room -- I'm doing a big log cabin and the running back and forth with every little seam was driving me crazy! This idea is perfect, thanks!!

  22. #47
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRenea
    When you're at the sewing machine, pin a scrap of cotton batting (I use a safety pin so I don't get poked) to the shoulder of your shirt. As you snip threads, just stick them on the batting scrap. When a lot of thread accumulates, just throw it away. Just don't forget to take it off when you're done...I once met someone at the door wearing mine! :D
    I save all scraps and thread cuttings...so after using this tip, toss in a bag and keep for stuffing pillows etc.

    LOL, renea, I bet they thought your 'pin' was creative! :lol:
    About a month ago, I had an allergy appt. and while talking to him, I happened to notice a baby diaper pin on the sleeve of my long sleeved shirt.
    I was shocked, so blurted out, "I have a safety pin on my shirt!"
    I had forgotten that I put it there to mark for cutting. Was preparing to shorten sleeves. Doc said, "Leave it there!"
    Smart man :XD:

  23. #48
    Super Member alaskasunshine's Avatar
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    I remember my Mom used a beer bottle with an aluminium top that had a sprinkler tip on it. She would shake it and water would sprinkle on the clothing. She used to iron my Dad's uniforms for the Army. I have always loved to iron!. Oh how I wish I could find the tip she used. Does anyone know what I am thinking of? :?

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilliebee
    Hi, seems there are lots of tips and tricks to be found online. Just wondering if anyone has a favorite they'd like to share.
    I just learned one from an Anita Solomon Grossman book which she uses when starching large quantities of fabric. I rarely startch, but I love this tip: partially dry your fabric and throw it in the fridge or better yet the freezer. Iron when you have time. Something about the coldness of the fabric makes it iron even smoother. Don't know why, but it sure works, especially when I don't have time to iron and don't want the fabric to get too dry or go sour.
    Oh gosh I did that when I had five little ones running around and a ton of white shirts with french cuffs to iron, my DH wore white shirts sometimes two each day if he had meetings and back then they had to be starched, how I loved it when the permanent press fabric came out.

  25. #50
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    It's your quilt and nobody's perfect

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