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Thread: First try at applique

  1. #1
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    First try at applique

    I have decided to give applique a try. I want to do a rooster who's feathers overlap. But now I'm confused about what to use as a fusible. I'll want to stitch the edges down, but after searching Steam-a-Seam info on this Board, it sounds like both can gum up the needle.

    I think I want to use the techinque...I hope this makes sense... where you fuse the bonding glue to a piece of fabric, then cut out the applique, and then assemble the pieces on top of a teflon sheet with the pattern underneath so I can get them in the right place, and iron them. I don't think I want to use the pressure type of adhesives.

    Does anyone have suggestions about what won't gum up needles?
    Penny

  2. #2
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    Just clean your needle with rubbing alcohol every so often.
    Margaret F

  3. #3
    Super Member sewingitalltogether's Avatar
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    I've used a few different of the fusible iron on types and none of them have gummed up my needle. Seems like I usually get Heat n Bond light at JoAnns. Although I got some Misty Fuse from a quilt show. Sounds like you have the process pretty well. Iron the fusible onto the back of the fabric and cut out the shape. Sometimes the shape is backwards, then you use a light box to trace your shape. Yes, I have a Teflon ironing sheet to assemble the shapes. I sew with the invisible thread and a skinny zig zag stitch.

  4. #4
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    Eleanor Burns has a technique where she sews the fusible web to the piece and then turns it inside out and irons the piece to the background - thus giving the appearance of needle turn, then she sews it down. A friend of mine did it - she liked the appearance but felt she was doing everything twice. There was no gummy residue on the needle.
    Your idea of using the double sided makes perfect sense.
    I have not used Steam a Seam but maybe it is not made for appliqué - just a quick fix for hems. The only time I had a problem with a fusible was when I bought velcro that was peel-n-stick, and thought I would catch the edges with my machine and it did nasty things to my needle. (Had to throw it away that stuff was so stuck.) But I have used Pellon's fusible webs without a problem.

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    Mckenna Ryan uses that technique. find a you tube of her demonstrating it and note what fusible she uses.

  6. #6
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    I have used Pellon wonder under with absolutely no issues of gumming up the needle but it can be stiff so I window pane it when doing it as a fusible. But I don't know if you can use the technique you describe. I don't do much fusible applique.

    You may want to consider Misty Fuse.

  7. #7
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I do tons of appliqué and have been using Heat N Bond Lite for years. I love it. Holds well until I get everything stitched down and stays flexible. It washes away when you launder your finished ( quilted and bound) quilt. It's always my recommendation. I stitch my appliqués with a small blanket stitch or small zigzag- not a fan of heavy/ stiff satin stitch.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  8. #8
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    I have used Pellon 805 for several years and have never had a problem with it.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  9. #9
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    I use Soft Fuse. It is so light, it doesn't feel stiff at all and does not gum up the needle. It works well for layering.

  10. #10
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    I just watched Alex Anderson on YouTube today doing different demos on Floriani Applique-web for softer appliques, Appli-web plus with paper backing and Appli-stick for appliques you can reposition.

  11. #11
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    I have been doing applique the way you described for more years than I care to count. Most of the paper backed fusibles like those mentioned above are just fine. They do not gum up the needle. Misty fuse is not paper backed so if you want to use it you need to use parchment paper as the backing for the fusible web. The Eleanor Burns technique is not good for detailed applique like McKenna Ryan or Toni Whitney (two of my favorite designers). You should have a template of the finished motif and the pieces should be reversed for tracing. You trace the pieces,rough cut around each piece (not on the line). Then you pick your fabric for each piece (I use batiks because they are tightly woven and have no front or back). Iron the pieces to the back of the fabric if there is a front and back. Now you cut out the pieces on the line, remove the paper backing and put them in place (the parchment paper is on top of the template so you can see it underneath the parchment paper). This is just how I do it, there are many variations.
    Debbie
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  12. #12
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    I use Steam a Seam Lite 2 for all my applique/mosaic work and I've never had it gum up the needle.

    Watson

  13. #13
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    For the record. I have tried iron on type appliqué, but do not like the results I get, so I found this method that works great for me. It even works with little tiny pieces. I like to hand stitch the appliqués down so this is a great way to do it.

    This is the method I use.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/tutoria...d-t240526.html

    This is my first attempt at applique using a method I found somewhere on the 'net. I do not remember where, sorry.
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...d-t240237.html
    Last edited by madamekelly; 05-18-2017 at 10:50 PM.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  14. #14
    Super Member NZquilter's Avatar
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    I've use both Wonder Under and HeatnBond Lite and I prefer HeatnBond. I like the way how it softens once washed.
    We didn't realize we were making memories, we just knew we were having fun. ~ Winnie the Pooh ~

    1912 World's Rotary Treadle (White Company), 1942 Singer 66-16, 1952 Pfaff 130-6, 1954 Singer 15-91, 1956 Singer 201-2

  15. #15
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    I use either steam-a-seam 2 (or lite) or my favorite (although pricier) soft fuse. If I have any build-up on the needle, I simply wipe it off.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by applique View Post
    I have been doing applique the way you described for more years than I care to count. Most of the paper backed fusibles like those mentioned above are just fine. They do not gum up the needle. Misty fuse is not paper backed so if you want to use it you need to use parchment paper as the backing for the fusible web. The Eleanor Burns technique is not good for detailed applique like McKenna Ryan or Toni Whitney (two of my favorite designers). You should have a template of the finished motif and the pieces should be reversed for tracing. You trace the pieces,rough cut around each piece (not on the line). Then you pick your fabric for each piece (I use batiks because they are tightly woven and have no front or back). Iron the pieces to the back of the fabric if there is a front and back. Now you cut out the pieces on the line, remove the paper backing and put them in place (the parchment paper is on top of the template so you can see it underneath the parchment paper). This is just how I do it, there are many variations.
    Thanks for the detailed info. That will help me get the results I want!
    Penny

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