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FMQ'ing over seams

FMQ'ing over seams

Old 06-25-2012, 09:07 AM
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Default FMQ'ing over seams

I've recently tried to FMQ over paper pieced seams. I'm finding that when it gets thicker, my machine doesn't feed them evenly. I get really tight stitches then normal stitch length. Am I doing something wrong?
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Old 06-25-2012, 09:14 AM
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What machine are you using?
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
What machine are you using?
I'm using a Brother LB-6800.
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by MommaDorian View Post
I've recently tried to FMQ over paper pieced seams. I'm finding that when it gets thicker, my machine doesn't feed them evenly. I get really tight stitches then normal stitch length. Am I doing something wrong?
This is the reason I almost always press seams open. Of course, with paper piecing, that isn't possible. Have you tried reducing the pressure on your presser foot?
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:12 AM
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If you are FM quilting, I'm assuming you're using a FM or hopping foot, and have your feed dogs down or disengaged. In that case, the machine should not be feeding the fabric at all, it is the motion of your hands that moves the fabric. So what might be happening is the FM foot is not hopping high enough to clear the extra-thick seam.

Some machines have the ability to adjust the amount of pressure on the pressure foot. If yours does, you can lessen that pressure so there is more 'give' when pushing that thick seam underneath.

If not, you may have to avoid the seams, or, and this will sound funny, take the quilt sandwich and hammer those seam intersections flat. There was actually a vendor at a quilt show once selling rubber mallets for hammering down seam allowances!
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Old 06-25-2012, 10:29 AM
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I try to get my seam allowances to lay as flat as possible. Sometimes if there are lots that come together in the same spot, I try to adjust my FMQ design so I don't have to stitch over those spots. My machine will go over them but the stitch size does change and I will occasionally get a skipped stitch. I just avoid them whenever possible.
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Old 06-25-2012, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by AndiR View Post

If not, you may have to avoid the seams, or, and this will sound funny, take the quilt sandwich and hammer those seam intersections flat. There was actually a vendor at a quilt show once selling rubber mallets for hammering down seam allowances!

I saw Liz Porter do it on a Fons and Porter episode once! It is really helpful when you have lots of seams meeting together like when you are making a star block or sometimes with a pinwheel block. I have a hammer in my sewing room just for this purpose. Have had to pull it out a time or two.
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:08 PM
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You will be surprised at the difference a little hammering can make on thick seams. Be sure and place the area to be hammered on a hard surface when you hammer it. A soft surface just cushions the blows.
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:34 PM
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I don't understand how your machine can be "feeding" your material if you are FMQing. Your feed dogs should be down and you should be controlling the speed of the flow of material. Also make sure you have a FMQ food on the machine. Hopefully you will get this problem figured out.
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:38 PM
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Uh oh. Would you guys believe I didn't put the feed dogs down? lol Thanks for the gentle reminder!!
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