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Thread: Frogging

  1. #1
    Super Member Watson's Avatar
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    Frogging

    I have to frog a whole bunch. Unfortunately.

    I know there is a formula for taking so many stitches on top and then taking some on the underneath...


    What's the quickest way to do this?

    Watson...rippit, rippit

  2. #2
    Senior Member ArlaJo's Avatar
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    I hate frogging! Lucky me, hubby does most of it for me.
    So much fabric, so little time.

  3. #3
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    I tend to use my smaller rotary cutter for seams. got that tip from Eleanor Burns.

  4. #4
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    Another way...and unfortunately I can't remember where I saw it on YouTube......that little ball at the end of the short finger goes on the bottom, between the two seam edges, hold firmly and straight, and with that long finger on top, set the blade right up against the seam and you should be able to just move it along....cutting the stitch as you move.....it really works and I guess this is how professional tailors, sewers do it!

  5. #5
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    I cut every third stitch on top, then the bottom thread pulls off easily.
    Lisa

  6. #6
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
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    I rip by every fifth thread loop on top and pull on the bottom thread. It works like the old flour bags. (Lol, I guess that shows my age knowing about the bags.) If you are NOT on a bias edge, you can use a white pencil eraser to help grab the threads that remain in the seam. Just gently draw it over the threads and it usually grabs them out of the fabric.

    I tried using the ball side to rip the way Geri b says, but, alas, I cut the seam fabric anyway. So, I don't do that.
    Last edited by RedGarnet222; 06-07-2018 at 10:24 AM.
    RedGarnet222

    "Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern ... It will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that ...one stitch at a time, taken patiently."
    *Oliver Wendell Holms

  7. #7
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    Fons or Porter said to cut every 5 - 6 stitches on one side and the thread on the other sides should just pull out. It works most of the time. Happy ripping!

    All the suggestions you're getting, proves we quilters surely know how to un-sew seams!!
    Last edited by SillySusan; 06-07-2018 at 10:24 AM.

  8. #8
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    I used one of those scalpel rippers to un-quilt my quilt. Work under a good light for 15-20 minutes at a time. Take a mini break and then right back to it.

    Good luck!

  9. #9
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Are you frogging piecing or quilting? If quilting, Google "how to skin a quilt" to find tips that make it go much faster.

  10. #10
    Super Member petthefabric's Avatar
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    There is an electric tool, looks like a shaver. And there's a manual seam ripper with a rubber bulb on the opposite end for getting out the threads.

    I cut the threads on the side I can see the best, every 4-5 stitches. Then pull the opposite thread.

  11. #11
    Junior Member quiltingshe's Avatar
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    The last quilt show I went to I bought a little battery shaver, a mustache trimmer I think it was called, but it works great. Google it for a demonstration. It is made by Wahl. The address with mine is Sew Wonderful Dreams, Coeur D'Alene, ID

  12. #12
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    I use curved manicure (cuticle?) scissors with the tiny/skinny points for a lot of my frogging.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Ripping is so easy. I have had lots of practice. Should be able to do it in my sleep.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  14. #14
    Super Member jmoore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe'smom View Post
    I cut every third stitch on top, then the bottom thread pulls off easily.
    Same here...
    attitude is everything...the rest will fall into place.

  15. #15
    Senior Member janjanq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingshe View Post
    The last quilt show I went to I bought a little battery shaver, a mustache trimmer I think it was called, but it works great. Google it for a demonstration. It is made by Wahl. The address with mine is Sew Wonderful Dreams, Coeur D'Alene, ID
    I just got one and love it for long seams but have trouble using it for small pieces. I find it I hold down one end of the fabric with my elbow to hold it taut it works great. But haven't figured out how to separate small pieces. I'm assuming from reading other posts that frogging means ripping out seams, but I had not heard that term before.

  16. #16
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    For quilt tops of blocks I cut every 3-5 stitches.
    I use the shaver type item more for if I have to remove work done on my LA as it is faster. Unfortunately, on blocks and tops there would be a lot of cut threads to remove.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  17. #17
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    Some people do the "rriiippp" thing to take apart a seam - but when I've tried it, I've also unintentionally torn the fabric.

    So I do it the tedious way.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by janjanq View Post
    I'm assuming from reading other posts that frogging means ripping out seams, but I had not heard that term before.
    See Watson's post above: rippit, rippit
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  19. #19
    mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingshe View Post
    The last quilt show I went to I bought a little battery shaver, a mustache trimmer I think it was called, but it works great. Google it for a demonstration. It is made by Wahl. The address with mine is Sew Wonderful Dreams, Coeur D'Alene, ID
    Just letting you know that this shaver is most likely a "Wahl" mustache trimmer and it costs less than $10. Several of my friends have bought one at the big quilt shows and when you take off the label on the shaver that the seller put on them, there for everyone to see, is the Wahl trademark. My friends paid $25 for these and then I show them mine that I bought on Amazon, which is the same one, for $8. So, please be advised. You can also get them at Walmart.

  20. #20
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    $25 vs. $8......Ripped off by one of our own! Not good....buyer beware. Give it a fancy name and a basic tool or gizmo becomes a specialty item......

  21. #21
    Senior Member Quiltlady330's Avatar
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    Geri B, I believe there are many identical tools that we can get somewhere other than our quilt shops that are much less expensive. It seems if it's in a quilt show or fabric shop it automatically costs more. Very sad, especially for new quilters who are having to buy all their tools to get set up.

  22. #22
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    To avoid stretching the fabric, I clip with my seam ripper every 5 or 6 stitches (depends on stitch length) and pull the thread off on the opposite side. I use a piece of masking tape wrapped around my fingers to take away the little cut threads.

  23. #23
    Junior Member jackiesmith's Avatar
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    I do every 3 to 4 stitches "on top" being the side I can see the best. I may not be a professional quilter, but I definately am a professional ripper.
    Kindness matters

    Jackie

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    $25 vs. $8......Ripped off by one of our own! Not good....buyer beware. Give it a fancy name and a basic tool or gizmo becomes a specialty item......
    What's the world coming to when we can't even trust quilting "friends".

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by janjanq View Post
    I'm assuming from reading other posts that frogging means ripping out seams, but I had not heard that term before.
    As noted, it's called frogging because you rip it, rip it. I believe this was originally a knitting term. When i frog knitting, it kind of sounds like its saying riiiiiibbit, riiiiibbit as you pull the yarn and the stitches pop apart.

    The length of the seam to be removed, the length of the stitches and the orientation of the seam relative to the straight of grain or bias are all factors in determining which ripping technique to use. When I have a long seam with normal to long stitches, i like to clamp down one side, open up the seam into a V, and pull gently on the other side. The tension on the stitches makes them pop right in half long before the ripper gets close enough to cut the fabric. And its fun, lol. I sometimes use one blade of a scissors when I do it this way. My sewing machine has drawers, and the top one is at exactly the right height for me to slide it shut on one piece of fabric and press on it with my knee to maintain tension while I rip.

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