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Thread: Fusible Applique Question

  1. #1
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    Question Fusible Applique Question

    When doing fusible applique, do you fuse the interfacing to the entire piece, or just to the perimeter of the piece you are adhering? Example: You want to fuse a triangle to a background. Do you put fusible on the entire triangle or just around the perimeter of the triangle? I want to make a Sunbonnet Sue using fusible applique, but I am not sure how to fuse the pieces of Sue to each other and then to the background.

    I hope this is clear. Thanks in advance for your help.
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    It depends a lot on what fusible you are using. Some fusibles stiffen up applique pieces quite a bit. I would classify Wonder Under and regular Heat n Bond as stiff. When using these, especially on large pieces, you want to "window" the fusible, leaving it only around the edges. A soft fusible such as MistyFuse does not stiffen the applique pieces, so there is no need to "window".

    MistyFuse is a very lightweight fusible web that does *not* come with a paper backing. However, it's pretty easy to add one. Just iron the MistyFuse between two pieces of parchment paper and then, while the fusible is still warm, peel off one of the pieces. You now have paper-backed fusible! I have not done this recently, so I'm not sure what kind of marker would work on parchment paper. Maybe someone else knows. I would probably cut out the shapes I want in freezer paper and iron those on the right side of the fabric before cutting out. When you are ready to fuse the applique to the background fabric, peel off the paper backing of the fusible.

    If you are not sure how stiff a fusible will be, buy several and compare practice pieces. You can tell quickly whether the fused applique is stiff or not, and how stiff.

    Edit: Are you intending to sew around the applique edges? The fusibles that don't require this are generally quite stiff. If you use something like MistyFuse, you really need to sew around the applique edges.

  3. #3
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    Thanks Prism. I have used mainly Steam-a-Seam2 Lite and it does get somewhat stiff. I have a package of Mistyfuse and will try that, especially with adding a paper backing. Thanks for the idea!
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

  4. #4
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I should add the step where you fuse the MistyFuse to the wrong side of the applique fabric before cutting out your shapes.

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    It is well worth the time to (window) just leave the perimeter and cut away the centre, if the shape is large enough. It leaves the applique feeling much softer. I usually get all motivated picking my fabrics when I start a project and forget to cut them out though. It's not a disaster with the steam a seam 2 light, it is quite soft (haven't tried misty fuse). But wonder under was stiff as a board and very noticeable on the finished quilt.

  6. #6
    Senior Member IceLeopard's Avatar
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    Once Wonder-Under has been washed, it softens considerably. Even so, I window large pieces. (Windowing also lets you make the most economical use of the fusible.) I hated Steam-a-Seam. It gummed up the needle somethin' awful.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member petpainter's Avatar
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    I will chime in that I have used wonder under, and steam a seam lite. But I am doing a BOM with Sue Pelland and she does raw edge using misty fuse only- as mentioned above- you MUST fuse the fabric before fussy cutting the shapes, but it comes out soft as butter. I don't think I will ever go back to using a fusible with a release paper- it's so much easier and softer! There is no gumming on the needle at all either. Now what to do the whole roll of wonder under I have lol!

  8. #8
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    Try soft fuse. It comes with backing on one side. I use it for wool applique and it does not gum up the needle. You do have to use a good bit of steam to adhere it though

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    It depends a lot on what fusible you are using. Some fusibles stiffen up applique pieces quite a bit. I would classify Wonder Under and regular Heat n Bond as stiff. When using these, especially on large pieces, you want to "window" the fusible, leaving it only around the edges. A soft fusible such as MistyFuse does not stiffen the applique pieces, so there is no need to "window".

    MistyFuse is a very lightweight fusible web that does *not* come with a paper backing. However, it's pretty easy to add one. Just iron the MistyFuse between two pieces of parchment paper and then, while the fusible is still warm, peel off one of the pieces. You now have paper-backed fusible! I have not done this recently, so I'm not sure what kind of marker would work on parchment paper. Maybe someone else knows. I would probably cut out the shapes I want in freezer paper and iron those on the right side of the fabric before cutting out. When you are ready to fuse the applique to the background fabric, peel off the paper backing of the fusible.

    If you are not sure how stiff a fusible will be, buy several and compare practice pieces. You can tell quickly whether the fused applique is stiff or not, and how stiff.

    Edit: Are you intending to sew around the applique edges? The fusibles that don't require this are generally quite stiff. If you use something like MistyFuse, you really need to sew around the applique edges.
    Yikes!!!! What an excellent tip. Now I want to run and get some MistyFuse. I have never used it.

  10. #10
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    Iceleopard, I have just finished working on a fused quilt using steam a seam 2 lite. I followed the video on their website instead of reading the instructions. BIG MISTAKE! She does not steam it and only irons it for a few seconds. Broken needles, frayed thread and much hair pulling later, finally I read the proper instructions- If you would like do a finishing stitch, it's recommended to use a steam iron and to iron press for 30+ seconds. - Much better!



  11. #11
    Super Member madamekelly's Avatar
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    I have started using a light weight iron on fusible Pelion set right side of appliqué to rough side of Pelion. I draw my shape on the Pelion, then stitch around complete shape. Slit the Pelion near the center and turn right side out. You will have the iron on side facing the back side of your fabric. Flatten and smooth the edges, then press in place. Stitch down around the edges. Flip to the back side and carefully trim away the backing fabric leaving at least 1/4” to 1/3 inch around the edges and press again. Now you can add any other pieces without adding bulk or stiffness.
    If you always do, what you have always done, The results never change. Change is the wings you give yourself.

  12. #12
    Junior Member Sheep Farmer's Avatar
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    Love all the tips here.
    Being fairly new to applique, I've only used Steam-a-Seam products. I think I will venture out into other products and see which ones work for me on various projects. I would also like to eventually buy a fusible by the yard using my 50% off coupon, but I just have no clue what to buy in that arena. Way over my head.
    Sheep Farmer by day ~ Learning to Quilt by night

  13. #13
    Super Member ILoveToQuilt's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the great tips here! Can't wait to start my project...unfortunately, I have quite a few PhD's* to complete. (I am trying to be disciplined here...don't know if it will work, though! LOL)

    *PhD's...Projects Half Done
    Anita

    The only place that housework comes before quilting is in the dictionary.

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