Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 50

Thread: As a general guideline - how much do, or would you, charge for your time?

  1. #1
    community benefactor Conniequilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    891
    I am starting to get a few requests for quilts from non-family members.

    I always tell them they have to pay for materials. That hasn't deterred them yet. Probably because I tell them labor is free.

    I have never been able to figure out a fair price to charge for my time. I also crochet and have had the same problem.

    Some general guidelines would be helpful.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    17,462
    Connie- there's a thread going right now that you should read.
    Let me see if I can get it to you.

  3. #3
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Holland, PA
    Posts
    4,321
    Depends of who I'm making a quilt for. If they are giving of their time, etc. I may say nothing. If they are just wanting my skills, I think you are supposed to multiply cost of materials by 3.

    Quote Originally Posted by Conniequilts
    I am starting to get a few requests for quilts from non-family members.

    I always tell them they have to pay for materials. That hasn't deterred them yet. Probably because I tell them labor is free.

    I have never been able to figure out a fair price to charge for my time. I also crochet and have had the same problem.

    Some general guidelines would be helpful.

    Thank you!

  4. #4
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    17,462
    Problem: Expected quilts

    Darn- I can't figure out how to send you the link.
    But that's the title.

    My time is too valuable for anyone who isn't family or very special to me. So I don't have any advice for you, sorry!!

  5. #5
    community benefactor Conniequilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    891
    Quote Originally Posted by sueisallaboutquilts
    Problem: Expected quilts

    Darn- I can't figure out how to send you the link.
    But that's the title.

    My time is too valuable for anyone who isn't family or very special to me. So I don't have any advice for you, sorry!!
    I read that link. It doesn't say anything about how to charge. Just that people expect free quilts and learning to say no. I don't want to say no but do want to be paid for my time.

    Thank you for looking that up for me :)

  6. #6
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7,192
    Blog Entries
    3
    when i started researching this several years ago, the average rate i read was $15 per hour. i wouldn't hesitate to charge $20 per hour - plus supplies. supplies include but are not limited to fabrics, batting, needles, thread and rotary blades. if embroidery is involved add the cost of stabilizers.

    of course, that formula doesn't work for me. i'm pretty methodical and meticulous which slows me down. if i charged by the hour, i couldn't sell a placemat for under $100. somehow, i don't think i'd get many customers. :lol:

    i just look at the quilt in my imagination and pick an arbitrary price that feels right.

  7. #7
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    rural Maryland
    Posts
    1,566
    Connie, You are asking the 64 dollar question. I just e-mailed a lady that called my guild requesting information about having a quilt quilted. We have several good longarmers in our guild but all have waiting lists. I know from experience that their prices are starting to go up. When it comes to making a quilt from start to finish we are talking a different kettle of fish. Keep track of how many hours it takes you to make and finish a quilt then multiply by at least $10. By the time you add in the price of the fabrics etc. we are talking a lot of money. There is an Amish market in my general area. They have some handmade quilts for sale. There was one beautiful, probably king size white on white so it was wholecloth, beautifully handquilted. The price tag was at least $1100. I wouldn't have purchased it because it was marked with #2 pencil that usually doesn't come out. I have seen smaller quilts done by the Amish in the Lancaster area for up to $5000.
    Several years ago I handquilted at least 6 quilts for a local lady who owns a custom framing shop and who was formerly the curator of our local Historical Society. She had no problem paying me at least $.10 a square inch to finish her grandmother's quilts. She routinely gives local people a 10% discount. I did the same for her. Those people who keep asking you to make them a quilt need to realize that your time is just as valueable as theirs.
    These are the same people who will pay $25 an hour to have say a wedding gown altered. Almost 20 years ago I worked in a shop that did custom dressmaking and alterations. People were willing to pay us $14 an hour to sew on buttons and repair zippers etc. If you can't do it yourself you have to pay.

  8. #8
    Power Poster cjomomma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Murray, Ky. Looking for a nice cushy pillow to rest my head on!
    Posts
    14,916
    Blog Entries
    2
    I just told a friend if she buys the material I will charge her $50.00 to make one for her.

  9. #9
    Super Member Rainy Day's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria Australia
    Posts
    1,100
    Offer to pay for them to go to a quilting class - it would probably be cheaper for you! Or, ask them to pay you in kind - what skills do they have? Plumbing? Carpentry? Car repairs? Cleaning? Cooking? Child minding?
    As many hours as you spend on their quilt. Watch them back slowly out the door!

  10. #10
    Super Member donnajean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Holland, PA
    Posts
    4,321
    I had a neighbor who wanted me to make a quilt for a friend of hers who had a baby. I made her go shopping with me to buy the material so that she could see that she was only going to pay me for labor. I did not charge her much as she was always there for me when there was a medical crisis.

  11. #11
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    20,158
    I have decided that I will have three rates for any quilts I might make.

    1) Gifts of love and/or charity - I buy everything and donate the time

    2) You buy the fabric and I donate the time

    3) About $15 per square foot for an "easy" quilt and about $30 per square foot for something more complicated - plus the cost of materials. (I think that translates into - I don't really want to do commissioned/hired work)

  12. #12
    bertadel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Redondo Beach, CA
    Posts
    134
    This website shows detailed prices for making quilts.

    The prices are very specific. Look at it and go from there. Look at Custom Services. Good luck! I also know some who pays about $600 for a throw but it depends on how detail the pattern is.

    http://www.amishhandquilting.com/

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    609
    Great thread. I found this discussion helpful, too:

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-42701-1.htm
    "For those of you that sell..."

  14. #14
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Keene, New Hampshire
    Posts
    4,270
    $15/per square foot

  15. #15
    Super Member b.zang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    1,974
    Blog Entries
    1
    Wow, that link to the Amish quilting service is fascinating!
    It's very difficult to be paid what custom work is really worth but it looks like they have it down to a real science.

  16. #16
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    32,956
    Wow, thanks for those links.

  17. #17
    mlaceruby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Somerset PA
    Posts
    901
    I have made and sold my things for years. you never get paid for your time no matter what the craft!
    I charge $15/hr plus materials for my finished items
    for a queen size quilt this means
    $150(fabric and materials) + 10hrs x 15=$300
    so a throw size is $125
    a baby $60
    right now I don't think the market will handle 3x the materials but in some places it may

  18. #18
    community benefactor Conniequilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    891
    Thank you all very much for your help. I truly appreciate your time and advice for how to proceed.

    My goal: to earn enough to someday get my own quilting machine :) Someday!

  19. #19
    MelodyWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Mesa,Az
    Posts
    1,277
    I ran into the same issue-when I showed my work at a local shop-got a lot of orders -I figured out all cost and doubled them-it paid off-I also require 1/2 on ordering and the other 1/2 on delivery-that way the materials are covered-no body had a problem with it - if people want it they will pay!

  20. #20
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    A million dollar view!
    Posts
    8,889
    Nobody can afford me!

    If I were it would have to be no less than $15 an hour. I work slow but I'm good. :-)

  21. #21
    Super Member BonniFeltz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Dekalb, IL
    Posts
    1,874
    We can talk about this tomorrow at lunch also Connie. I was told by a person who went to craft shows that you should charge 3x your costs.

    A lot of it depends on if they furnish the materials. If they do, I'd either go with them or give them specific amounts to get. If they are a non sewer or non quilter, they might not know how much, etc.

  22. #22
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,662
    Check out some of the quilt sellers on Etsy and see what their rates are for finished quilts in the size you are making. Be sure to also check how many they have actually sold using that price matrix. I think you'll find that the current rates are closer to twice the cost of materials, not three times, for utilitarian quilts. Whatever price you and the buyer agree upon will be the best price when all is said and done. ;-)

  23. #23
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,164
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would maybe try to keep it simple. Since they are already used to paying for materials, perhaps charge materials times 2 for an easy quilt, materials times 3 for an intermediate quilt, and materials times 4 for an expert level quilt (feathered star, bear's paw). If the quilt is queen or king-sized, add another multiple (materials times 3 for an easy queen-sized quilt, for example).

  24. #24
    Super Member butterflywing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    currently central new jersey
    Posts
    8,700
    it also depends on your location. in the area of a big city, you can charge a lot more because there's more money going around and less competition.

    determine how much you want to make each hour. how many hours will it take. if you don't know, overestimate. it still won't be enough hours. then double that, AT LEAST. so it you want $10 an hour for a quilt that takes 10 hours, double $100 and charge AT LEAST $200 (plus all materials). the reason is this: you can do what they can't. that's worth a premium price. your plumber charges, what? $50? to walk into the house. and he charges you for any materials he needs to buy. he's no better at what he does than you are.

    if you live in an area where money is tighter, decide on how low you want to go. there is a point at which it doesn't pay any more. below a certain price, people think you should work for free and then get huffy when you want a fair price. they think they can bargain and they don't want to understand that you're already at rock-bottom. if they can't afford to pay you fair price, they have to buy off-the-rack. people can't have everything they want just because they want it.

    whatever you decide, good luck. let us know how it works out.

  25. #25
    Super Member raptureready's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    5,282
    I don't do commissioned work because I don't want to do what others want, only what I want. Does that sound selfish? Yes, well, that's okay. I worked too many years having to do everything according to someone else's wishes. Now that I'm retired it's my turn. If I make something that I've enjoyed and someone wants to buy it then as long as I get my money back plus just a little, I'm okay with it. Afterall, I've had the enjoyment of making it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.