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Thread: As God is My Witness, I Will Never Use Monofilament Thread Again--Oh My Lanta!!

  1. #1
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    As God is My Witness, I Will Never Use Monofilament Thread Again--Oh My Lanta!!

    I did a quilt class at my LQS and made a "Quilt As You Go" Quilt. It turned out pretty darn good (well, I am almost finished, just need to do the borders). But, it was such a pain in the keester!!

    It consists of 10 inch blocks each joined by sashing and the top front side edge of the sashing is sewn down using monofilament thread in a small zig zag stitch. It involved a lot of switching back and forth between regular thread and the monofilament thread (as you do things in a certain sequence) so a lot of threading the machine. At first it was just hard to work with thread you can't SEE but mid way through I had a lot of tension problems where the bobbin thread broke (both top side and bobbin are monofilament) but towards the last row I did, the top thread kept breaking as the thread would unspool from the spool then wrap around the thread "peg" and then tighten and snap. The top thread broke 5 times sewing my last set of rows together.

    I still have to join the borders to the quilt and will definately be using my decorative thread that I used for the quilting instead of the monofilament to sew down the sashing. The instructor mentioned this as an option in the class and 9 out of 11 people chose to use their regular/decorative thread instead of the monofilament. I felt that if I didn't try it, I wouldn't know if I could do it or not. Now that I have done it, I'm not sure it SHOULD be done. Such a pain!!!

    Anyway, I don't see myself working with monofilament thread and completely tip my hat to anyone that is able to. The instructor of our class acted like it was no big deal--she had over 15 gorgeous quilts at the class that she has made and they all used monofilament thread.

  2. #2
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I am not a fan of the mono filament thread either.


    My newest Grandson, Caleb Austin, was born May 29th. I am now Grandma to 4 precious babies. I am so blessed!!!!

  3. #3
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    It's okay for small pieces.

  4. #4
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    The way the monofilament is wound, it needs to stand upright. Either put it on a stand or - depending on what type of spool you have, put it in a jar behind the machine and run the thread over the uptake lever. That should take the wrapping problem away.
    Martina
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  5. #5
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    Martina, thank you for the tips. The first time I used the thread I had it on my slanted spool holder and it unwound all over the place so the instructor showed me what that little "peg" accessory was for and I have used it since then on the upright peg. It was only today that it started having trouble with the upright peg as well. So you say I should try putting it in a small jar behind the machine--interesting.

  6. #6
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    I'm right there with you. I don't like it and neither does my machine. The other issue is how do you get rid of or secure the ends? In regular thread I knot and bury the ends in the sandwich. When I tried that with the mono I had a hard time getting the knot to stay tied and it didn't want to stay buried. The newer brands are supposed to be better but I'm not ready to fight with it again. There are too many wonderful threads out there without struggling with monofilament.

  7. #7
    Junior Member CruisingStef's Avatar
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    That Settles it! I Have some here at the house to try, but after reading all the excerpts from everyone I think it would be
    better to stay with my colorful threads like I had planned in the first place.
    Quilting is my stress buster!

    ~ Stephanie ~

  8. #8
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
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    I love MonoPoly invisible thread by Superior. I use it a lot! I lower the tension, use a 90 topstitch needle, skip the last thread guide before the needle and slow down. Important to use poly on a spool and not nylon and don't have thread on a skinny spool. I also use a net cover on the thread. It certainly is different thread but very do-able.

  9. #9
    Senior Member 1000projects's Avatar
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    Nylon monofilament is no fun. I FMQed a small quilt with it, it makes for a "pokey" quilt. Maybe the Monopoly is better?

  10. #10
    Super Member sewingsuz's Avatar
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    I am with you 100 percent, I don't like it either, it won't stay put on the spool.
    Suzanne
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  11. #11
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    I found out that monofilamenty thread can be a problem although I use it a lot on charity quilts. I learned never to use my thread cutter with this thread. It popped back and wound around the tension and this just froze my machine. After two trips to the repair shop and it was explained to me, I'm more careful. I use it on the top but not on the bobbin. So far I have had no problems. Just use care!

  12. #12
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindasidlow View Post
    I love MonoPoly invisible thread by Superior. I use it a lot! I lower the tension, use a 90 topstitch needle, skip the last thread guide before the needle and slow down. Important to use poly on a spool and not nylon and don't have thread on a skinny spool. I also use a net cover on the thread. It certainly is different thread but very do-able.
    I do the same and I also tape a closed safety pin to the top of my machine to thread it through before threading the machine. I also agree that Superior Thread will make all the difference in FMQ.
    When you sleep under a quilt, you sleep under a blanket of love.

  13. #13
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    I did use the Superior brand MonoPoly as I was told it will not melt like the nylon type. It comes on a medium size spool. I didn't really have trouble with it wanting to unspool until after I had used it several times. I have never heard of a "net cover" for thread. Is that a home style remedy or a product I can purchase at Jo-Ann's?? Also, why do you skip the last thread guide before the needle? What does this do?

  14. #14
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I use to use it quite a lot, only for top thread, never in the bobbin. Top tension must be pretty loose. I gave up because it got too hard to thread the needle and seemed to get knotted up.
    Another Phyllis
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  15. #15
    Super Member jayelee's Avatar
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    I myself agree with you completely if I never see monofilament thread again I will be very happy

  16. #16
    Super Member fayzer's Avatar
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    I read somewhere that if you touch a black Sharpie to the end of the thread, you will be able to see to thread the mono filament through the needle. After reading your post, I don't know if I want to use mine. I bought the kind that disappears when you touch a hot iron to it.

  17. #17
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    It sounds like you got a bad monofilament. I prefer rayon or polyester over nylon, and I place the spool in a coffee mug behind the sewing machine. It feeds better that way and doesn't get wrapped around everything. Other than that, I treat it like regular thread. Look for a monofilament thread that is supple and not very thick.

  18. #18
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I hate monofilament. I can't stand the look of it in a quilt or the feel. Yuck.

  19. #19
    Senior Member EmbQuilt's Avatar
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    I ...knocking on wood...lately have been having good luck with monofilament thread. In the past, I only had horrible experiences using all the techniques but the nets(use that for some of my serger threads). I've been using it on my quilted crafts/wallhangings in the bobbin and the top thread. I set my machine to slow and have it on the horizontal pin. Oh i am having luck with coats and Clark. Who would have thought? Not me!!!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Highmtn's Avatar
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    I'm going to heed this warning...and steer clear of it. I do just fine with my normal quilting thread.Thanks!
    "It's a *fine line* between HOBBY and MENTAL ILLNESS"~ Dave Barry

  21. #21
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    I love the Superior monopoly....it is amazing...BUT you do have to use the right needle, right tension, etc...makes a world of wrong if you don't!

  22. #22
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Invisible thread needs to come off the side of the spool, not the top. Pulling it off the top of the spool causes it to twist and pool around the base of the spool. Cross wound threads need to come off the top of the spool. Stack wound needs to come off the side. If the thread doesn't make xes on the spool it's stack wound.

  23. #23
    Super Member Rose L's Avatar
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    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen View Post
    Invisible thread needs to come off the side of the spool, not the top. Pulling it off the top of the spool causes it to twist and pool around the base of the spool. Cross wound threads need to come off the top of the spool. Stack wound needs to come off the side. If the thread doesn't make xes on the spool it's stack wound.
    I appreciate your very clear explanation. I learn something new everyday here. Thanks!
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  24. #24
    Senior Member quiltbuddy's Avatar
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    I have just started using this thread to do some applique using 60/2 embroidery thread in the bobbin and a size 8 needle and loosening the upper tension. I am so impressed, it looks like hand applique. At first I had trouble with the bobbin thread showing on the zigzag stitch until I switched to the smaller needle. The brand I had in the house was Sew Art International. I'll have to try the Superior brand in the future. This thread was timely because I haven't ironed it yet, do you think I have to use a lower setting in my iron? So far it doesn't feel stiff, rough, or prickly. Since my stitches are so close together I don't secure or tie the ends, just sew over the beginning for a quarter in or so.
    Last edited by quiltbuddy; 11-07-2011 at 04:28 AM.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Kath12's Avatar
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    I occasionally use it but I use Sulky monofiliment. It makes a difference in using a quality thread and not the cheap stuff. Also some machines just plain don't like it! I have one machine that is that way. The machine that I use most is fine with using it. I start out on a sample to get the tension adjusted then I have no problems
    Kathy Stewart from IA
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