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Thread: Has anyone tried the new technique for cutting half-square triangles?

  1. #51
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    to make HST, I cut 2 squares about an 1/8 inch larger than the pattern calls for, draw diagonally line, sew 1/4 in on each side of line, cut on draw line. You will have 2 HST. BUT before you press open, I use Quilt in a Day HST square up ruler, after trimming to correct size, then press open. This ruler is for HST from 1 1/2 in. to 6 1/2 in.

  2. #52
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I totally agree with what you said about the template being a bit too close to ones fingers; blood on my fabric is
    not what I want.
    I sometimes make HSTs larger than her templates are.
    I use "Triangles on a Roll "

    Quote Originally Posted by pocoellie
    There are various methods for making HST's that you can try without a template. One of the best things to do though, in my opinion, is starch, starch. With this template, I would be afraid of slicing my fingers. LOL

  3. #53
    MNM
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mumzbear
    My daughter bought a new template for making perfect half square triangles at a quilt show last week.
    HALF SQUARE TRIANGLE TEMPLATES: Introducing a new template technique for cutting faster, more accurate half square triangles.
    I watched the tutorial at

    http://templatetechniques.com

    I was very impressed as I always have a problem keeping them from stretching. I would like opinions from other quilters as to what they think of this method.
    I am not able to down this tute BUT I just saw a Tute on another quilt board and all they did was take two squares the size you want to work with. Place them right sides together and sew around all side, thats right all four sides.
    Then put you ruler corner to corner and cut, very careful not to move the pieces , cut from the other side corner to corner , in other words a criss cross cut. Viola !
    you have 4- 1/2 square triangles . I did a quick tute on this today at my line dance class and everyone was very suprised and happy to know how to do it. Our teacher is a beginning quilter . I think it is the easiest way I have ever made them.

    MNM

  4. #54
    joy
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    4 MNM... sounds easy, so that means that where you cut, all the seams after that will be on the bias !!! You will have to be careful....

  5. #55
    MNM
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    Quote Originally Posted by joy
    4 MNM... sounds easy, so that means that where you cut, all the seams after that will be on the bias !!! You will have to be careful....
    You are OH so right and you have to be careful when you iron them open, don't stretch them. Can be done if you are careful. And they are very fast to make and mine seem to be all the same size and fit together just great.

    MNM

  6. #56
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    I use the Wondercut Ruler also. It is just great and the fastest way I've found to make hst's.

  7. #57
    Senior Member calicocat's Avatar
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    I have been using the technique someone posted on the board where you cut say a 4" square and sew 1/4 all the way around it then cut it in quarters corner to corner. Works perfect. Look for the post they have all the math done. I love it.

  8. #58
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
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    [quote=Rachelcb80]Everyone keeps mentioning making HST's without marking on the fabric. What method (other than cutting each triangle individually) allows you to make HST's without marking a seam line?]

    I cut squares, put them face to face, sew 1/4" from the edge all the way around, cut it from corner to corner in an X, and I have 4 perfect HSTs.

  9. #59
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    I cut two long strips - right sides together - stitch 1/4" seam on each long side and cut triangles (turning material with each cut). Press open and trim to size. The corner 1/4" seam at the point of each the triangle is pulled apart.

  10. #60
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebecca VLQ
    What others said, different strokes for different folks, but my eyes glazed over within the first minute on her explanation...
    LOL Yours and mine too!! I use and swear by Rhonda's methods. I'm just a beginner but they work for me every time. And there is nothing to buy, and nothing to try to find when you are ready to make them except your ruler and cutter.
    Also, someone posted a wonderful graph telling what size square to start with to end up with each different size HST.
    Sorry I'm in a fibrofog just now so I can't find any of the links to share but they are on the board if you search.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by nantucketsue
    I saw this technique, I think it was on TQS, where you lay two squares together, sew 1/4" around all four sides and then cut diagonally across twice = four half square triangles. OK so you have to work out how big to cut the squares for the required finished size, but that is all. Sew Simple and fast! I agree with feline fanatic that it is better to add 1" rather than 7/8", then square it up.
    Remember to be aware that this method (and others) have you ending up with all edges bias. this can lead to problems when you start joining. starching might help this, but it is better to just use a method that keeps the edges
    on the straight of grain.

  12. #62
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    Oh my goodness ! I just watched the video. that lady waving an open rotary cutter around gave me the chills ! and not using a ruler to cut those lines ??yike, what a recipe for a really nasty accident. can you imagine your blade angling across & ruining all that fabric--let alone cutting yourself!
    sorry if I rant--but cutter safety becomes more important after you see a nasty "accident".
    these are bias-square HSTs with a technique first shown by
    Marsha McCloskey years ago. early method is very accurate for smaller units,especialy if you have a lot of them to produce, but a little hard to understand until you do it.

  13. #63
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    Oops ! I checked online & see that Marsha has also fallen into the "make a new ruler to sell" group, her original method only required a bias square ruler to make any size.
    If I can find some instructions that are not copyrighted, I will post them.
    by-the-way====copyright laws cover a multitude of situations. everyone should make themselves aware of the
    stipulations of such.
    enough, I will shut my mouth now.

  14. #64
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    Thank you for the information/ God bless.

  15. #65

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    Actually I found another on this site but, I forget where I was. It led to going to U Tube as the gal from Missouri Star quilt co took 2 blocks and put them together face to face and stitched a 1/4 inch seam all around the square, then sew from corner to corner to corner and the same on the remaining corners to form a X and low and behold perfect half square triangles. I made 3 of them this morning which made 12 inch squares for my pinwheels for a table runner. They were so cool when I got them squared up and ready to go. There was a formula on that site too. This was the largest size. I think its fast and accurate with no marking or even a tool. I am going to make a baby quilt that way. Certainly is easy. Now if I can remember where I found it on this site. It is a drag to get old. I could of passed on this. LOL Got to laugh to keep from crying.

  16. #66
    Junior Member nantucketsue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNM
    Quote Originally Posted by joy
    4 MNM... sounds easy, so that means that where you cut, all the seams after that will be on the bias !!! You will have to be careful....
    You are OH so right and you have to be careful when you iron them open, don't stretch them. Can be done if you are careful. And they are very fast to make and mine seem to be all the same size and fit together just great.

    MNM
    I was thinking, if you cut the squares "on point", then you would have the edges on the straight grain.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #67
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    If I have to do a lot of HST's, I do them in a large square and cut it in 4 directions. there is very little streching this way

  18. #68

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    I make my own, I draw a half-square triangle on computer paper and make copies of it.You can several rows of them on one sheet. You can then cut them apart by rows or leave them all together and lay a whole sheet on your fabric. That way I can make it any size I want and its cheaper then buying them all one size.

  19. #69
    MNM
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    Quote Originally Posted by nantucketsue
    Quote Originally Posted by MNM
    Quote Originally Posted by joy
    4 MNM... sounds easy, so that means that where you cut, all the seams after that will be on the bias !!! You will have to be careful....
    You are OH so right and you have to be careful when you iron them open, don't stretch them. Can be done if you are careful. And they are very fast to make and mine seem to be all the same size and fit together just great.

    MNM
    I was thinking, if you cut the squares "on point", then you would have the edges on the straight grain.
    Boy that's thinking out of the box, I would never have thought of that. You must be young to have such a good brain. I will be trying that as soon as I get back from my morning walk. Gotta have some discipline in my life.
    Love all of you on this site/board.

    MNM

  20. #70
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobo2000
    Someone posted a method on the board putting 2 squares face to face and sewing 1/4" all the way around, cut on diagonal twice for 4 perfect hst's. I had so much fun playing with this idea, I ended up with a pinwheel quilt over the weekend.
    I don't know how to find it again but it was two weeks ago. None of these rulers work for long, I lose them or forget them.
    Yep, this is the way I do it too. One can make that first square any size you want. I made so many when I first learned that I have borders and straight-line sashings from those 1/2 sq triangles ready for charity quilts any day. The tut I liked the best is from the Missouri Star Quilting Company. Gosh, it was amazing how much I learn from their other tutorials too! Good luck.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekYpJzHoW6E&feature=fvsr

  21. #71
    Senior Member newjeepgreen's Avatar
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    Sasiemae is your quilt on your forum bargello or is it dont in strips. It is absolutely beautiful. ta

  22. #72
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    I used Rhonda's Tute and they turned out the best ever,and no streching.

  23. #73
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smitty
    Oh my goodness ! I just watched the video. that lady waving an open rotary cutter around gave me the chills ! and not using a ruler to cut those lines ??yike, what a recipe for a really nasty accident. can you imagine your blade angling across & ruining all that fabric--let alone cutting yourself!
    sorry if I rant--but cutter safety becomes more important after you see a nasty "accident".
    these are bias-square HSTs with a technique first shown by
    Marsha McCloskey years ago. early method is very accurate for smaller units,especialy if you have a lot of them to produce, but a little hard to understand until you do it.
    I totally agree with you about her handling of the rotary
    cutter, I cringed at the way she was waving it around and
    not closing it when she put it down. When I was teaching quilting classes I made sure my students practiced rotary
    cutter safety, only had one accident in 5 years and I was
    the casualty.

  24. #74
    Member tammystitches's Avatar
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    I also go to the Thangles when I need to make half square triangles .. Made a Hunters Star Quilt using Thangles
    Attached Images Attached Images

  25. #75
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nantucketsue
    Quote Originally Posted by MNM
    Quote Originally Posted by joy
    4 MNM... sounds easy, so that means that where you cut, all the seams after that will be on the bias !!! You will have to be careful....
    You are OH so right and you have to be careful when you iron them open, don't stretch them. Can be done if you are careful. And they are very fast to make and mine seem to be all the same size and fit together just great.

    MNM
    I was thinking, if you cut the squares "on point", then you would have the edges on the straight grain.
    Fantastic idea! Thanks! And do not forget ladies, if you cut with a large wide ruler to wear a cutting glove! I also use one of those suction cup hand guards for a shower attached to my ruler as a handle. Works great and remains safe.

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