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Thread: help is needed

  1. #1

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    I am in the process of making a KING size quilt, measures 104" across and 95" vertical. Have tried pinning, but have problems with getting the top to lay flat and smooth. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I know this is a monster I'm working on, just wish I could figure out if I could cut it, then sew it back together after quilting is finished. I will never try this size again. Making it in Log Cabin. Please help. Mary

  2. #2
    Member AskaGirl's Avatar
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    I'm making a queen size log cabin at the moment, and am doing it in quarters. Quilting to within an inch or two of the edge on each piece, and then stitching the top together, trimming the batting to butt up against the adjoining piece, and then I'll hand sew the backing closed (leaving a bit of overlap). Then, I'll just quilt those final joins at the end. Well, that's the plan at least. ;)

    If your top is already together, maybe try one of those spray-on adhesive-basting products? I don't know. I'm sure you'll get better suggestions from the other folks here!

    Good luck!!

  3. #3
    MTS
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    Here's a link to Sharon Schamber's video on basting:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhwNylePFAA
    There are two parts.

    Are your plans to quilt it yourself? Hand or machine?
    Is sending it out to a local longarmer an option?

    You can always just have it basted by someone with a longarm machine - and then still quilt it yourself with whatever method you want.

    If it's a log cabin, then it's really just blocks - it shouldn't be too hard to take it apart and do it in quarters as was suggested above? Or break it down into 3 strips?

    There are many different methods for QAYG (Quilt As You Go) techniques to deal with this situation/problem.

    I know many have quilted king-size quilt on regular domestic sewing machines. They must be very patient people. ;-)

  4. #4
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    Welcome to the board from Southern California!!!

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the suggestion, I'll have to check around and see if there's anyone in our area to help me out. I've done double size many times on the machine and never had any trouble. For some reason this one has been giving me trouble right from the first, maybe I'm not meant to do it. But, I'll keep trying. Thanks again. Mary

  6. #6

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    I have so much respect for people to quilt their own quilts. I have done a couple of table mats or runners and a baby quilt, but never had the courage to do anything larger. So--- I can not give you any advice only be your cheering section. You go, girl. All the best.

  7. #7
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    i've basted on a folding table. doing the center first, then moving and basting the rest.
    machine quilting a king size can be done, but difficult.

  8. #8
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    When I did a really large quilt a friend helped me. We took it to the church - but a LQS would do - and used their tables. I used the basting spray. I figured I could always thread baste it later if needed, but it wasn't needed.

    Remember to spray the material not the batting.

    ali

  9. #9

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    Since I'm new to this board, I was surprised at all the help I got. Finally finshed that monster, putting binding around it now, just a little(?) more to go. If my daughter doesn't handle this with kid gloves, I may go bonkers. Thanks to all who helped, Mary Lou

  10. #10

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    Hi, I think the note you sent made me more determined to get this monster done, almost there. I know I have 1 or 2 crinkles in the backing, but I'm going to tell my daughter they are free of charge. Again, thanks, Mary Lou

  11. #11
    tooMuchFabric's Avatar
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    I have made several larger size quilts, in fact I used to turn my (uneducated!) nose up at "small quilts, why would anyone do that??"
    Now I LOVE minis and table sized pieces and lap quilts as well as bed quilts.
    We grow.
    Anyway, back to your subject:
    The first king I made was the reason I got my first mid-arm quilter. I just could not face quilting it on my domestic.
    But lots of people do, and do stunning work.
    .

  12. #12

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    Oct 2010
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    I've done about 6 of these monsters.

    This is just how I do it.... no right or wrong intended.

    basting steps:
    1/ I lay out the backing on a hard flat surface (making sure I have extra backing...... due to my table size that surface becomes my hardwood floor for this size quilt.

    2/ I tape (yes that awful word) with blue painter's tape the backing to the floor starting in the middle of each side and working to the corners (added bonus, I can mark the exact center w/ a sharpie on the tape)

    3/ Repeat steps 1 and 2 with the batting

    4/ I center and lay out the top

    5/ I pin the top to the batting and the backing just like I taped the backing and batting down (these will not be permanent, they hold it in place while I pin from the center out) Making sure it is centered and stretched as much as I can

    6/ using the curved safety pins (and this is why it's on a hard surface) I pin from the center out to the mid-line on each side. Then I repeat that for each quadrant created until I've pinned with them about 4" apart- I have a TON of safety pins.

    7/ untape and I hand baste, yes this takes forever, but I don't have a long arm machine and I'm not sure I could keep everything aligned anyway. I usually baste with a curved needle and leave it laying there where it was taped, I only untape the areas i'm working on so everything stays put.

    8/ roll the backing around the batting and pin (using the pins we originally placed on the edges of the top) with raw edges hidden to prevent fraying- with as long as it takes me to quilt these this is important

    9/ I remove the pins in about a 12" block starting in the center and working out. Then I quilt that block and move on to the next work out in the same way I pinned


    I can usually get a king size quilt basted in a couple hours which means it's under painter's tape for probably just under an hour. I make No claims that this is the "right" way to baste this type of quilt, it's just what works for me! Good luck.

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