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Thread: HELP PLEASE!! Alternative to Pounce Chalk

  1. #1
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    HELP PLEASE!! Alternative to Pounce Chalk

    I finally chose a pattern for the borders of a quilt and now need to mark it and start quilting tonight and find myself unprepared. My LQS is closed today and my two other alternatives don't have the Pounce pad in stock.

    Can I use something else in place of the chalk? Baby powder perhaps?

    Thanks in advance,
    Cathy

  2. #2
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    eleanor burns has said that you can slightly dampen your fabric and use baby powder. i think they used a disposable foan brush to apply it. hope this helps
    Nancy in western NY
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  3. #3
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    One of the gals on another board uses cinnamon. I read that you can also use cornstarch.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  4. #4
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    You guys are lifesavers! Thanks so much.

  5. #5
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Cornstarch is a real bug magnet so, if you use that, make very sure you can get it all out...even what's under the stitches (not even thinking about what may be punched into the batting). Baby powder sounds like a much better idea, or talcum powder.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  6. #6
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    The baby powder made with talc is supposedly harmful if you inhale it. And the other type of baby powder is made of corn starch, so you're back to the possibility of bugs. I wonder what's in the pounce?

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    And I have discovered Press 'n Seal Plastic Wrap and colored Sharpie markers. You trace your design on the plastic with a sharpie, press it by hand (keep the iron away from plastic) onto the quilt sandwich, and proceed quilting. I use a well ventilated area when tracing the design to the plastic.

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    I've used the Press n' Seal plastic wrap also. I FMQ my first quilt using this. It peeled off easily after stitching. Please let us know what you used and how it works.

  9. #9
    Senior Member jeank's Avatar
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    At a class recently, the instructor said we could use the cheap chalk, she said the 19 cent box not the 99 cent box. grind it up with a mortar and pestal. I think the 99 cent box is called dustless, and you want the dust. She said to go to the dollar store. Then use a powder puff to apply.
    Jean in MI

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dandish's Avatar
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    Although I've never done it, I've read that if your working on light colored fabrics you can use cinnamon- anyone every try this?

  11. #11
    Super Member chairjogger's Avatar
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    This is interesting. Just saw the pounce for the first time at NQA show. Huh...my pounce, years ago was small eraser crumbs for drafting!! Swear, it all goes back to drafting tools!! Never thinking out of the box. RATS
    Sometimes you just have to sit in a chair and jog in order to get anywhere.
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  12. #12
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dandish View Post
    Although I've never done it, I've read that if your working on light colored fabrics you can use cinnamon- anyone every try this?
    I wonder about this too, as I would think the cinnamon might stain ... I'm going to experiment on some fabric and try it out.

    I love all things cinnamon, so would enjoy the aroma as I continued to work from it .... if it works!




    To those using PressNSeal ... please tell me more! Does it stay in place as you work? or does it slide around? How large an area do you apply the PNS before going to the machine? If you get the PNS onto the quilt crooked, can you reposition it and it still stick? .... and anymore tips and hints about using PNS, please share!!!!!!
    Last edited by QuiltE; 06-19-2012 at 06:04 AM.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliP View Post
    And I have discovered Press 'n Seal Plastic Wrap and colored Sharpie markers. You trace your design on the plastic with a sharpie, press it by hand (keep the iron away from plastic) onto the quilt sandwich, and proceed quilting. I use a well ventilated area when tracing the design to the plastic.
    Quote Originally Posted by katydidkg View Post
    I've used the Press n' Seal plastic wrap also. I FMQ my first quilt using this. It peeled off easily after stitching. Please let us know what you used and how it works.
    I'm really wanting to try FMQ but nervous about it - this sounds like a great tip! I happen to have some of this down in the kitchen....I know what I'm going to try later today!!

  14. #14
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    I recently got a pen style marker. According to the package, the marking medium is talc.

    I had not thought of dampening the fabric before using the chalk. That would probably make it last longer.
    jlm5419-an Okie back in Oklahoma!
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    I've used talcum powder several times quite successfully, and next time will definitely try to dampen the fabric a tiny bit. The only problem I had with the talcum powder was how quickly it disappeared under my hands when I was quilting.

    I use a little box of Avon talc which has been hanging around my house for quite a while, with a small piece of sponge to apply it. I wash the quilt immediately on finishing it, and the talc disappears completely. Quite a good, economical solution, in my opinion.
    Maggie in Jerusalem
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    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    Hi all, I tried the talc last night but found it disappeared quickly but I was able to make some progress.

    So, today - sent DH out to the LQS to get me a Pounce Ultimate, which is supposed to have more staying power but he came home with just the refill. So, I will use it with the hint about the sponge paintbrush and then get an applicator at some point in the future. He also brought me home a roll of Glad Press n Seal.

    I had to laugh about the Pounce though. I gave DH $15 before going to work and told him that it would be somewhere in that range. "I got a real deal," he said. "It was only $5.95!" (Um...I thought...didn't you think something was wrong there?? Just didn't say it out loud.)

    Thanks for all the replies.

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    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Before you try Press 'n' Seal for quilting, do a search to check out what some of the others who have used it have to say. It can be very difficult to remove all the bitty pieces under the stitching with tweezers when you're done. The gripping part is made from chewing gum ingredients.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  18. #18
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    Thanks Ghost, I have read that as well. Chewing gum ingredients? Hmmm....

    I'll play with it on practice squares. At the very least, I have some extra wrap in the house.

  19. #19
    Super Member icon17's Avatar
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    How about cornstarch?
    May Your Life Be Full of Charity and Love.

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    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    Mentioned at the outset, but there are concerns about bugs. Thanks for the reply.

  21. #21
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmw0829 View Post
    Thanks Ghost, I have read that as well. Chewing gum ingredients? Hmmm....

    I'll play with it on practice squares. At the very least, I have some extra wrap in the house.
    teehee I sound like a big ol' naysayer, don't I!? First the bugs and cornstarch, then the gum in Press 'n' Seal. Just trying to relay what others have learned along the way to save you some time and possibly more frustration. (Me, I use a Sewline pencil for all my marking tasks. Swear by it, but it's slower marking than a Pounce I imagine.)
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  22. #22
    Super Member lisalovesquilting's Avatar
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    Ever wonder why it's called Pounce when you swipe it, not pounce it?
    Peace is one of His greatest gifts.

  23. #23
    Senior Member maryb44662's Avatar
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    i haven't heard anything negative about waxed paper. I just trace my design on waxed paper, pin in several places to the the quilt and sew. It works wonderful!
    MaryB

  24. #24
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    Before you try Press 'n' Seal for quilting, do a search to check out what some of the others who have used it have to say. It can be very difficult to remove all the bitty pieces under the stitching with tweezers when you're done. The gripping part is made from chewing gum ingredients.
    Thanks Ghostie!!! ... not a naysayer at all .. in fact I appreciate your passing along info you have. I had been wondering about the plastic staying in the threads, and ewwww about the chewing gum!
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  25. #25
    Senior Member Phyllis nm's Avatar
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    This may or not be helpful always test on scrap


    CHALK
    For 25 years I have done freehand embroidery work and this has worked best for me.
    I ground up different colors of chalk in my mill grinder to see what worked best [what could be seen and removed]. White chalk [baby power, or corn starch] can be vacuumed off on med and dark fabric no problem.
    Other colors can be reduced in color intense with white, the more intense the color the harder it is to remove. I just use white and light blue now, the blue is reduced with white. Blue and white chalk is at hardware stores for snap lines [cheap].
    You can use a vanishing power with a black light on any color [in the dark]. It is very good for names.

    PAPER
    I use canary paper from an art or drafting supply.
    I tear off more than I need and trace a design with 5mm mechanical pencil, place on a piece of ¼” foam rubber on a firm surface. Then I use a small needle syringe [for shots] and poke holes into the lines at key points about 1/8th” apart following the design, then I flip it over and sand off the tips with a sanding block or sand paper. I have also used a clear plastic film a permanent marker and sanded the tips, or a small stencil burner. When sanding place pattern on foam or batting, not on a hard surface, to much pressure you might tear your pattern. Mark top front with an “F” [north] so you know placement direction. This way you can tell which way your pattern is laying, and it is easy to reverse, or flip.
    Then I have a reusable pattern I can use over and over.

    APPLYING CHALK
    I took a short wide mouth ball jar lid and a nail [or drill] punched a lot of holes in it.
    Took a ¼”green scrubber cut it to fit inside rim on top of the lid.
    Took a scrap of velour about 3/8” larger than the lid and placed it on top of the scrubber then screwed the hole thing together onto the jar with my chalk in it. You will have to pounce a while till the chalk starts coming through good. Wipe off your pattern before replacing it so you don’t get shadows.
    I did this, years before any thing else was on the market, and still use the same ones today.

    You can use cinnamon to mark on light fabric then wash it away.
    I add white chalk to dark blue powered, the blue and red does not want to wash out.

    PATTERN MARKING
    Holding your pattern down firm with one hand, slide your chalk jar across your pattern in one direction only, you can repeat as long as you do not let up with your first hand. You can see if you need to slide again as long as the first hand stays in place. If it is wrong, vacuum it off and start over.

    ON A QUILT MACHINE:
    I use a piece of Plexiglas about 48x20 and slide it between my batting and my quilt top. This makes a firmer surface to stencil on. Then I take my pattern stencil and place it where I want it, swipe it with powder. Slide the Plexiglas out and quilt. Then vacuum the power off later.

    If unsure where to place your pattern on the quilt after it is on the machine try this. Draw placement lines on your pattern, north-south-east-west. [Fold in half matching center both directions]. Mark your top with an X placement before you load it on the machine. Then you have your placement mark and don’t have to guess alignment.

    I just read that if you hair spray your pattern after applying it the chalk stays on till washed. I have not tried it yet.

    LETTERING
    I have made charts of script alphabets in different sizes 1”-2”-ect. on large sheets of card stock paper. [ years ago, with a projector.] Then I trace and connect my words to transfer to my garment or quilt. Now copy machines are the answer.

    I am fast at this as I have done it for years. If you think this is to long, I don’t type, I peck.
    I am just saying…..I hope this helps someone.
    Phyllis

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