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Thread: help------please

  1. #1
    saf
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    Have just finished the top of my rail fence quilt --- pleased as punch as it is my very first attempt - now to the quilting part. What sort of a pattern would be suitable yet easy for a beginner to attempt.

  2. #2
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Diagonals across the face of it.

    Jan in VA

  3. #3
    Super Member JanTx's Avatar
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    Either Stitch NEAR a Ditch (just sew straight lines near your seams) or diagonals (Start at one corner and sew to the opposite corner. Use the corners of your blocks as a guide.)

  4. #4
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
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    Since it is made up of strips, stitching in the ditch is always the easiest. I am assuming you will be quilting by machine. Another idea is an all-over stipple or meander, but that takes a bit more practice.

  5. #5
    saf
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    I've hear that stitching in the ditch is quite hard to get neat - any tips

  6. #6
    saf
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    I've not done any quilting before so would a bit of practice first presumably would be a good idea

  7. #7
    Aunt Retta's Avatar
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    One thing I do is to stitch right outside of the ditch and use a decorative stitch, which because it isn't perfectly straight will help to cover up less than perfect stitches.

  8. #8
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    If your machine has the capibity to drop the feed dogs, why not try some free motion loops and lines?? Pin or spray baste your 3 layers together, start in the middle and work your way out, sewing with a nice medium speed. RELAX and just go with the flow......I find it fun to practice on a plain sheet of paper to allow the creativity to ''flow''. Think of gentile curves and loops like you are making eeee's or lllll's on the fabric.....have FUN!1

    jodi

  9. #9
    Super Member SuzyQ's Avatar
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    Instead of stitching in the ditch, you could stitch a straight line down the center of each rail. Masking tape makes a great stitching guide.

    Susan

  10. #10
    saf
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    Great tip ---- will certainly try this and will also try the decorative approach - feel nervous but excited - feel I'm almost a quilt maker

  11. #11
    Senior Member kem77's Avatar
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    I have only done stiching by hand in a ditch. I like you don't have to sit at the machine and you are able to move.

  12. #12
    Member LeslieTQD's Avatar
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    If you are nervous about the actual quilting process you might think about tying your quilt. Double Rail Fence was the first quilt I made and I ended up tying it (at the block corners using a color coordinated yarn) just so I could have the satisfaction of finishing a quilt. That might inspire you to challenge yourself and add a different technique on the next quilt you make.

  13. #13
    Super Member JanTx's Avatar
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    That's why I call it "Stitch NEAR a ditch". :) Don't even try to stay in the seam line - use the side of your foot as a guide - keep it on the seam line and you'll be NEAR the ditch. The decorative stitch is good, too, but don't get too fancy - it uses a lot of thread that way and I don't like how slowly I have to go to let the machine to the decorating. May be my simple machine makes that order than most?

  14. #14
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    stitching in the ditch is sometimes done only 1/4 away from the seam,not in it. so try that.

  15. #15
    Senior Member RUSewing's Avatar
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    That was one of my first quilts! I had a pantograph design done by professional, but now do most of mine myself.

    Feet: It may not need to be said, but if you do some straight line quilting, be sure to use a walking foot with the feed dogs up. If deciding to do free motion, use the darning foot with the feed dogs down.

    I enjoy meandering; put on some good music or an audio book start in the middle, and then think gingerbread men - lol! It works for me as do the loops, hearts, O's, OR if you have a pattern backing, quilt with the backside up and follow the pattern. First, I have to do a small sample to make sure my tension is near perfect.

    Just enjoy!

  16. #16
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Do diagonal lines in both directions. This will create an "X" pattern thru your blocks. If you do this, alternate the stitching so you are creating x's. This way the quilt will not get out of shape. Use a walking foot if you have one.

  17. #17
    saf
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    Great advice. What about tension?

  18. #18
    Super Member frarose's Avatar
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    I did the stippling on my string quilt and it was hard on the hands because I put fleect on the back. I don't have good luck with stitch in the ditch.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #19
    saf
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    beautiful quilt.

  20. #20
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I did a big meander on mine. It was easy, went fast, and I thought it looked good.

  21. #21
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    What is the Fabric? I often use the fabric to give me guidance. If there is a floral, I would use a leaf & floral free motion meandering, if swirls try &create a swirling design, etc.

    Generally, with a straight block, like log cabin, split rail,, I try to use a curved design.

    I also use the serpentine stitch built in my machine to stitch in the ditcch. Align the needle up with the seam, & the stitch will go to both sides, creating a curved effect, & if you use a varigated thread it is pretty.

    Good luck, relax & enjoy.
    Be sure to post when done, we all want to see your 1 st.

  22. #22
    Junior Member Toni-in-Texas's Avatar
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    To do "stitch-in-the-ditch" by machine I use a foot called an "edge-joining" foot. It has a little bar in the middle that you can use to guide right down the seam line. On my first rail fence quilt, I hand-quilted the stitch-in-the-ditch.

  23. #23
    Super Member quiltmaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt Retta
    One thing I do is to stitch right outside of the ditch and use a decorative stitch, which because it isn't perfectly straight will help to cover up less than perfect stitches.

    Although I never have had problems SIDing it is really pretty using decorative stitiches as close to the ditch as possible. For future projects does your machine have the SID foot...it really isn't that hard to learn on practice pieces...you just have to watch that you keep that straight line going keeping your fabric alligned correctly :-D

  24. #24
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jodimarie
    If your machine has the capibity to drop the feed dogs, why not try some free motion loops and lines?? Pin or spray baste your 3 layers together, start in the middle and work your way out, sewing with a nice medium speed. RELAX and just go with the flow......I find it fun to practice on a plain sheet of paper to allow the creativity to ''flow''. Think of gentile curves and loops like you are making eeee's or lllll's on the fabric.....have FUN!1

    jodi
    I agree. Have fun with the quilting.

    ali

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