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Thread: Help! Sage Advice Needed...

  1. #1
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
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    Help! Sage Advice Needed...

    So I'm making up a pattern found on the internet at http://englandstreet.blogspot.ca/p/more-quilts.html?m=1 called Summer at the Beach. I got all of blocks made pressing to the dark as instructed throughout. Only now do I realize that my seams are not going to nest and I'm trying to line up "V's". So at this point with 4 joined and 60 more to go, I'm thinking there has to be a better way. Also, the instructions say to press the seams alternating directions so when I join the rows they'll nest. Well with everything currently pressed to the dark side, that will make for an extremely thick bumpy seam all over the quilt. So I figured I'd press them open... I'm wondering if I should just repress the seams within the blocks so they'll nest when I go to join them within the rows? What do you think?
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    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 01-08-2017 at 06:25 PM. Reason: language

  2. #2
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    You will be lining up a "v" no matter how it's pressed. I would leave it pressed to the dark.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    You will be lining up a "v" no matter how it's pressed. I would leave it pressed to the dark.
    Ya but if the seams are pressed alternately won't it be easier to do?

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    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
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    Try it both ways and see which works best.

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    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I always prefer that my seams nest, and if that is not possible/feasible .... I open the seams.
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

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    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I also like my seams to nest. Seems ( ) I get a better match that way, so unless my light fabric so light weight that the darker fabric will show thru, I press so the seams nest. Having said that, to repress half your blocks will take a bit of time. The only way I've found to make a seam go the other way after it's been pressed is to first press flat, like when you set the seam, then press the way I want it to go. You will have to be extra careful because all your blocks have bias edges and all the handling & ironing may distort them.
    As suggested by a previous poster, try re ironing a couple blocks then decide if it's worth the effort.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
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    Looking at it again, I think I'll just do my best to match them the way they are and press my seam open as I think I will prefer the look of the darker fabrics all laying at the same level on the face of the quilt rather than some up and down. Plus it's less work at this point. Once I quilt it, the open seams will be well secured ;-). Thanks for your input.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would press seams open and "glue pin" the seams at the ironing board before sewing. It would give me the most accurate matching for the V's.

  9. #9
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    i'm with Prism99 on this--I've found with those diagonal seams all coming together I've started pressing them open o they both match and lay flat so that when I quilt them I don't get "bumps"

  10. #10
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    I would press seams open and "glue pin" the seams at the ironing board before sewing. It would give me the most accurate matching for the V's.
    So do you mean to press the seams open within the bloc, then join the blocks? I tried the glue basting with the way the seams are pressed now, with limited success, since they are so thick.
    thanks.

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    Call me a cheater or lazy or whatever, but when I've got the not-nesting-already-sewed-these-bad-boys-down problem, I just snip the seam without cutting through it. Then I splay them apart so one goes east, the other west, then starch again, press the dickens out of them, and call it good. I've just never gotten the whole nesting thing down so I compensate. By the time I add batting, quilting, and backing, it all works together.

  12. #12
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwiltr View Post
    So do you mean to press the seams open within the bloc, then join the blocks? I tried the glue basting with the way the seams are pressed now, with limited success, since they are so thick.
    thanks.
    Yes. Press the seams open within the block, then join the blocks with glue basting. To do this, I would use a straight pin at each intersection 1/4" from the edge, pushing it down into the ironing board straight up and down. Once the seams are pinned, place a tiny drop of Elmer's washable school glue in the seam allowance at each pin and iron to secure. Remove pins and take to sewing machine. I get much better accuracy this way on difficult joins.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Kwiltr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    Yes. Press the seams open within the block, then join the blocks with glue basting. To do this, I would use a straight pin at each intersection 1/4" from the edge, pushing it down into the ironing board straight up and down. Once the seams are pinned, place a tiny drop of Elmer's washable school glue in the seam allowance at each pin and iron to secure. Remove pins and take to sewing machine. I get much better accuracy this way on difficult joins.
    Thanks Prism99 for your instructions and for responding so quickly. To be perfectly honest, in this particular case that sounds like way more work than I'm willing to go to on this project, so I think I'll just do my best to construct it as is. However, your method is certainly something I will take note of for reference on a future project where precision is going to be more important to me than in this case. Thanks again!

  14. #14
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I understand. I save this technique for jobs that require a high degree of accuracy because of the extra work. Even without glue basting, though, I think it is easier to match up V seams when the seams are pressed open. Good luck!

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    I press every seam open that I possibly can - within blocks and rows. I like the flatter block/quilt.

    I use a variation of Prism's method when joining blocks. I place the pin straight up/down through the intersection but not into the ironing board. I hold that pin steady then place pins normally through the 2 pieces of fabric on either side of that up/down pin. I do not glue but find that the 2 pins on either side of the seam hold everything in place quite well. I also sew over pins (yes, bad girl that I am) and find I don't have shifting issues.

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    What about when you quilt it? Won't the open be a problem when you try to stitch in the ditch? It's just a thought or do you have someone else longarm quilt it?

  17. #17
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keyswater View Post
    What about when you quilt it? Won't the open be a problem when you try to stitch in the ditch? It's just a thought or do you have someone else longarm quilt it?
    i never stitch in the ditch, so it's not an issue for me.

  18. #18
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    what you have done so far is wonderful. great piecing and matching. open seams help a lot, so i would continue with that.

  19. #19
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    BTW I love your colors and I agree that the open seams will give you great accuracy. You are headed for a great quilt.

  20. #20
    KLO
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    I am glad you made a decision and can get on with piecing. Sometimes it's tough to pick the best way to go and you just have to "pick one" and carry on. But I must also say that your fabrics and fabric colors are wonderful! Also your piecing looks very precise to me so whatever you are currently doing is working. This will be a beautiful quilt and I do hope you will show it here when you are finished with it.

  21. #21
    Super Member Shorebird's Avatar
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    Contrary to the opinion of most, I like seams to be pressed open. I long arm, and I can tell you it makes my job much easier when the seams are open........top lays flatter, bulk is greatly reduced.

  22. #22
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    I think I would press all the seams south on odd numbered blocks and north on even numbered blocks. Lay them all out separately in two stacks and it wouldn't take long to do that.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  23. #23
    Senior Member johnette's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zozee View Post
    Call me a cheater or lazy or whatever, but when I've got the not-nesting-already-sewed-these-bad-boys-down problem, I just snip the seam without cutting through it. Then I splay them apart so one goes east, the other west, then starch again, press the dickens out of them, and call it good. I've just never gotten the whole nesting thing down so I compensate. By the time I add batting, quilting, and backing, it all works together.
    I'm with zozee. I do the same way she does and it works for me. I like my seams to nest on their own but if they don't I whip them into shape.

  24. #24
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    When you sew your blocks together, be sure to lower your stitch length. That way where you are pressing your seams open, they are definitely secure. I press most of my seams open all the time, just use a lower stitch length. Harder to un-sew, but, oh well.

  25. #25
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    The way the blocks join, I'd press all seams on one block going UP, and the next going DOWN, so the seams can nest.

    eta: Oops, just saw that Mavis already told you basically the same thing.
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